7 years after total knee replacement

Posted by theresahubble @theresahubble, Sep 11 12:46pm

I have had both my knees replaced. But for the last 3 weeks my left knee is burning and has a hard lump on the out side. It also has been making a popping sound when I walk.

Hi there…….this is your first post on Connect. Welcome–Welcome. We are all patients, former patients, caregivers, and folks with experience to share that may be helpful to others. Just so you know, I now qualify for having both knees replaced as of 4 weeks ago. My first total knee replacement was also my left knee and happened 10 years ago. I have had the same experience as you appear to be having. One time it was some old scar tissue. That took several weeks of working with an MFR therapist to remove it. The next time it was just the "burn" with a cyst along the side. It kept me from my daily walks so I went back to the MFR therapist and she was able to make it go away in just a "few" weeks.

Because I have small fiber neuropathy, I now see the MFR therapist twice a week for sessions to relieve the symptoms of that condition. Whenever my knee is squawking a bit, I let her know and she works on it.

So….I do think these prior surgeries can come back for a visit. Maybe you had that knee tucked up the wrong way when you slept last night. Maybe you helped string blow the lower level of your yard and stepped in a squirrel hole that stretched the tissue. Because these are minor incidents, we tend to forget about them. Think about how your original knee used to complain when you took a stumble. There is still tissue and muscle around the replacement.

The bottom line for me would be to go back to the post-surgery "ice and elevate" routine for a couple of days and see what happens. If nothing helps and the symptoms do not retreat, then it would be advisable to ask an orthopedist to take a look at your knee.

Were both of your knee replacements done at the same time? Is the one giving you trouble the first one or the second one?

May you be safe, protected, and free of inner and outer harm.
Chris

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@artscaping

Hi there…….this is your first post on Connect. Welcome–Welcome. We are all patients, former patients, caregivers, and folks with experience to share that may be helpful to others. Just so you know, I now qualify for having both knees replaced as of 4 weeks ago. My first total knee replacement was also my left knee and happened 10 years ago. I have had the same experience as you appear to be having. One time it was some old scar tissue. That took several weeks of working with an MFR therapist to remove it. The next time it was just the "burn" with a cyst along the side. It kept me from my daily walks so I went back to the MFR therapist and she was able to make it go away in just a "few" weeks.

Because I have small fiber neuropathy, I now see the MFR therapist twice a week for sessions to relieve the symptoms of that condition. Whenever my knee is squawking a bit, I let her know and she works on it.

So….I do think these prior surgeries can come back for a visit. Maybe you had that knee tucked up the wrong way when you slept last night. Maybe you helped string blow the lower level of your yard and stepped in a squirrel hole that stretched the tissue. Because these are minor incidents, we tend to forget about them. Think about how your original knee used to complain when you took a stumble. There is still tissue and muscle around the replacement.

The bottom line for me would be to go back to the post-surgery "ice and elevate" routine for a couple of days and see what happens. If nothing helps and the symptoms do not retreat, then it would be advisable to ask an orthopedist to take a look at your knee.

Were both of your knee replacements done at the same time? Is the one giving you trouble the first one or the second one?

May you be safe, protected, and free of inner and outer harm.
Chris

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MFR?

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In reply to @futureglory "MFR?" + (show)
@futureglory

Myofascial Release – a type of massage/manipulation that breaks up the painful bond between the fascia (tissue under the skin) and underlying muscles Here is a description of how it works: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/back-pain/expert-answers/myofascial-release/faq-20058136

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