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charliewp (@charliewp)

Sprouted Grain Bread: Anything To It?

Healthy Living | Last Active: Oct 5 11:30am | Replies (28)

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@sueinmn

Hello Charlie – John gave you some great information, I thought I would add one bit of data – there is a nutritional difference between bread made from "sprouted wheat" – in its wet, sprouted state, and bread made from "sprouted wheat flour" – sprouted wheat dehydrated and ground into whole wheat flour. Sprouted wheat flour is nutritionally nearly identical to whole wheat flour. Sprouted wheat berries contain fewer calories and carbohydrates, may contain more protein, and can be easier to digest.
You can make your own comparisons here: https://www.nutritionix.com/i/

As for your farmer friend, he isn't wrong – wet wheat spoils easily, and is worth nothing commercially. But intentionally sprouted grains do provide nutrition in a unique way – the nutrients that feed the sprout can also feed you, and they are released by sprouting to make them nutritionally available. The trick is to catch them just sprouting and consume sprout and seed.

John's caution to read the label is a great one – some sprouted breads, like Ezekiel, are nearly all sprouted grains. Others, especially some of the mass market brands, may be wheat flour or sprouted wheat flour, with a few sprouts thrown in.

My takeaway – I have used sprouts in cooking and salad making and as pet treats for 50 years, but I haven't tried them in bread because I don't eat wheat and for my husband a single loaf of bread lasts for weeks.

Please use our comments as a starting place in your personal research and let us know what else you learn.
Sue

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Replies to "Hello Charlie - John gave you some great information, I thought I would add one bit..."

@ sueinmn

Hi,

I don't eat much bread but when I do, it is usually gluten free. Food for Life has sprouted gluten free bread. These
breads are in the freezer section. You have to play around with the different brands to get one that you like.
I just like the texture and taste of these whole grain or sprouted breads and keep it in the freezer and just a few pieces in the refrigerator for toasting. Sprouted bread decreased phytic acid which blocks the absorption of calcium, iron and I think zinc.

I don't eat it for the nutritional value but it is nice to know it is a healthful option. It is expensive but it lasts me a ery long time. And I love sourdough. Who doesnt love bread. Avacado toast with a fried egg,,,omg. I will have to find the recipe for an english muffin made in the microwave using almond flour…it was surprisingly good.,,,,and made in a large mug with the bottom about the size of a muffin.

FL Mary

Thanks for the reply. It's very much along the lines of a hypothesis that's emerging in my mind, and which I stated in the third paragraph of my original post. I think the answer probably lies in a close comparison of the sprouted wheat that my farmer friend — who has a shockingly high I.Q. but whose head is not in the clouds — disdains, and the sprouted wheat used to make sprouted wheat bread.

To some degree, these appear to be somewhat different animals. I'm after the comparison between the sprouted grain that my farmer friend laughs at and the sprouted grain used in sprouted wheat bread, AND how any differences make it through the process of turning grain into flour, AND the quantification (when possible) of any differences. The bottom line: Are there MATERIAL differences that are independently verified?

Lots of claims are made about food, both positive and negative. I regard most of the claims as specious, and think they proliferate because the mechanization of agriculture that's been underway since Cyrus McCormick's reaper has, over the generations, driven a wedge between eaters and growers. My personal answer has been to get to know the people who work so hard to feed me so well, and to dive into the details from time to time.

Thanks again for the reply. I appreciate it very much.

In reply to @sueinmn… I sent you a private message in mid September and am wondering if you did not receive it? Thx.

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