← Return to Was this an Afib attack or PVCs? Anxiety triggered?

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@slynnb

@braziljjay There's no point in guessing what your heart palpitations were. In fact, even if you go to a cardiologist and have an EKG, unless there is something abnormal in that EKG, he or she can't make a diagnosis on the spot. The doctor can do an exam, check the EKG for clues, and look at your family and personal medical history. Then the doctor can likely make an informed decision about whether the palpitations appear worrisome. If the doctor feels more info is needed the physician might have you wear a monitor or smartwatch with EKG program so you can catch the palpitations for analysis. You should contact your doctor due to your concern. The fact you did not faint and this episode seems unusual and not something happening frequently – and has several factors that could explain it – is reassuring. But call your family doctor or internist. A televisit and going over the episode that way or on the phone may be what's needed to reassure you and/or arrange for an in-person visit. Does what you experienced seem unusual or indicative of something serious? Many, many people are frightened by heart palpitations which can come out of the blue yet are often benign… but nobody can diagnose what they are by a description. Again, talk to your doctor and also cut back on stress, drink a lot of water, avoid stimulants and eat nutritious foods – and breathe…

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Replies to "@braziljjay There's no point in guessing what your heart palpitations were. In fact, even if you..."

A 48 hour holter monitor (4 years ago) in my case revealed non-sustained ventricular tachycardia in addition to pvcs and atrial tachycardia. My symptoms were frequent palpitations. I
never fainted. Now under control with low doas metoprolol.

Have had similar heart arrhythmia. Since I gave up caffeine coffee for decaf and no alcohol plus being careful not to overexercise. pacemaker girl tells me that I very seldom have them- less than .07 percent of the time