Seeds: What's inside counts big for your nutrition

Sep 7, 2021 | Marie Suszynski, Writer | @mariemayohecs | Comments (12)

 

 

Mayo Clinic doctors recommend eating a variety of seeds. Adding a tablespoon or two a day to your diet can bring big nutritional benefits without breaking the bank or sacrificing taste. Here, you’ll find a fab-four list of seeds and how to use them.

  • Flaxseed — Ground flaxseed is best because whole flaxseed may pass through the body undigested. Add a tablespoon of ground flaxseed to your hot or cold breakfast cereal or mix into a serving of yogurt. Add a teaspoon to mayonnaise or mustard when making a sandwich. Bake it into cookies, muffins, breads and other baked goods.
  • Chia— Sprinkle a tablespoon or two into a bowl of hot or cold cereal or a container of yogurt. Or try chia seeds on top of a salad or mixed into a smoothie. Due to their high soluble fiber content, chia seeds readily absorb liquid and turn into a gel-like substance with a slight crunch. Combining 1/4 cup of chia with 1 cup of liquid such as almond milk or fruit juice — and letting it sit for 15 minutes — creates chia pudding. This can be topped with fruit, nuts or other items to add flavor and texture.
  • Pumpkin — Pumpkin seeds can be toasted and eaten alone, or with a dash of salt and a sprinkle of grated cheese. Or they can be ground up and added to breads, spreads and other healthy snacks. Be aware that the salted kind should be enjoyed in moderation.
  • Sunflower — You can buy sunflower seeds shelled or unshelled. Once unshelled, they can be eaten whole or added to salads, yogurt, trail mix or stir-fry. They also taste good in granola bars. Choose unsalted if possible. Enjoy the salted kind in moderation.

 

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All the nut suggestions above I’ve been doing for the last 20yrs at least. Healthy alternative to chips or snacking fills one up with all the good fats and lots of minerals

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What benefit is derived from eating these seeds? Just curious.

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@quimbie

What benefit is derived from eating these seeds? Just curious.

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high fiber content, high nutrition content

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I add two tablespoons of chia seeds to my morning pea protein shake each morning to give it added thickness. I do this BEFORE taking my shower and shaving so it has time to absorb the almond milk liquid fully. I was told it is not good to eat chia seeds dry.

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I eat a slice of Nordic Nutbread every morning. Recipe:
I cup each slivered almonds, chopped pecans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and flaxseed. Add 1/3 cup olive oil, 1.5 teaspoons sea salt and 5 eggs. Mix and place in parchment lined loaf pan, level the top with a spatula and bake at 325 degrees F. one hour. I divide in five sections, freeze four and refrigerate the other for one weeks portion.
I also drink a Tablespoon of Chia seeds in a cup of water with my breakfast.

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How is bacteria count determined outside the supplier checks?

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@ab10

I eat a slice of Nordic Nutbread every morning. Recipe:
I cup each slivered almonds, chopped pecans, pumpkin seeds, sunflower seeds, sesame seeds and flaxseed. Add 1/3 cup olive oil, 1.5 teaspoons sea salt and 5 eggs. Mix and place in parchment lined loaf pan, level the top with a spatula and bake at 325 degrees F. one hour. I divide in five sections, freeze four and refrigerate the other for one weeks portion.
I also drink a Tablespoon of Chia seeds in a cup of water with my breakfast.

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@ab10
This recipe sounds wonderful. Just to be sure I'm understanding it correctly, there is no flour?

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@mariemayohecs
I know oxalayes bind to calcium but how do they affect other minerals/nutrients.
Jake

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@hopeful33250

@ab10
This recipe sounds wonderful. Just to be sure I'm understanding it correctly, there is no flour?

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Correct. There is no flour.

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can you eat chia seeds mixed in foods if you have achalasia. everyone touts seeds but doesn't say what diseases they're harmful for.

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@petuniamom567

can you eat chia seeds mixed in foods if you have achalasia. everyone touts seeds but doesn't say what diseases they're harmful for.

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Hello @petuniamom567

While I do not have achalasia and cannot answer your question, on Mayo Clinic Connect we do have a discussion group made up of members who do have achalasia. Here is a link to that discussion,
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/achalasia/ Perhaps you can ask that question in the group and find an answer.

If you don't mind sharing more, how long ago were you diagnosed with achalasia?

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Who should avoid eating seeds?

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