Urgent need for blood donation

Jan 3 8:00am | Jennifer O'Hara | @jenohara

Blood donations typically drop off around the holidays, making National Blood Donor Month in January and important time to share the message about saving lives by giving blood. The COVID-19 pandemic also has affected blood donations.

"The COVID-19 pandemic has really had an adverse effect on us recruiting and collecting blood donors in general," says Dr. Justin Juskewitch, associate medical director of Mayo Clinic Blood Donor Services.

Millions of people need blood transfusions each year. Some may need blood during surgery. Others depend on it after an accident or because they have a disease that requires blood components. Blood donation makes this possible.

"The inventory of today was the donations of yesterday," explains Dr. Juskewitch. "So paying it forward is also a really great way of helping take care of others. And then those others will be there for you when you meet your time of need. It's a great way to start the new year."

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Juskewitch discusses how to become a blood donor.

Learn more about Mayo Clinic's Blood Donor Program.

To practice safe social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, this interview was conducted using video conferencing. The sound and video quality are representative of the technology used. For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

Read the full transcript.

For more information and all your COVID-19 coverage, go to the Mayo Clinic News Network and mayoclinic.org.

Interested in more newsfeed posts like this? Go to the Podcasts blog.

Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment