Bladder cancer patients require ongoing surveillance

May 17, 2021 | Jennifer O'Hara | @jenohara | Comments (3)

Bladder cancer is a common type of cancer that begins in the cells of the bladder, a hollow muscular organ in the lower abdomen that stores urine. Bladder cancer signs and symptoms can include blood in the urine, frequent or painful urination, and back pain.

"The vast majority of bladder cancer patients are diagnosed with cancer that's not imminently life-threatening, but they tend to be aggressive," says Dr. Mark Tyson II, a Mayo Clinic urologic surgeon. "So bladder cancers, even if they're not life-threatening when they're first diagnosed, tend to recur."

For this reason, people with bladder cancer typically need follow-up tests for years after treatment to look for recurrence of their cancer.

May is Bladder Cancer Awareness Month. On this Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Tyson discusses bladder cancer diagnosis, staging and treatment.

To practice safe social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, this interview was conducted using video conferencing. The sound and video quality are representative of the technology used. For the safety of its patients, staff and visitors, Mayo Clinic has strict masking policies in place. Anyone shown without a mask was recorded prior to COVID-19 or recorded in an area not designated for patient care, where social distancing and other safety protocols were followed.

Read the full transcript.

For more information and all your COVID-19 coverage, go to the Mayo Clinic News Network and mayoclinic.org.

Connect with others talking about cancer, and supporting one another in the Cancer support group.

 

Interested in more newsfeed posts like this? Go to the Podcasts blog.

HPV was never mentioned. The elephant in the room?

REPLY
@volpinab

HPV was never mentioned. The elephant in the room?

Jump to this post

Hi Volpinab, interesting question. The conclusions of the 2020 review found that "clear etiological association between HPV and BC development cannot be established at this point."

– Human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer revisited https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/apm.13016

Do you have bladder cancer?

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi Volpinab, interesting question. The conclusions of the 2020 review found that "clear etiological association between HPV and BC development cannot be established at this point."

– Human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer revisited https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/apm.13016

Do you have bladder cancer?

Jump to this post

I don’t. But male friend did. He had an. hPV infection.

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.
  Request Appointment