Webinar: Infertility - not just a female condition

Thu, May 7, 2015
12:00pm to 1:00pm ET

Description

This one-hour webinar will give an overview of several important aspects of male factor fertility. Mayo Clinic urologist and male fertility specialist Landon Trost, M.D., discusses how often a male factor is present, what it means for overall male health, health of a future child, and the impact of aging. Dr. Trost also reviewed initial steps performed to evaluate for male fertility and treatment options. After his presentation, Dr. Trost answered questions.

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When should our family consider coming to Mayo vs. seeing another physician/location?

Should I have a semen analysis even though the doctor identified a problem in my wife?

If my partner gets pregnant after a vasectomy reversal, are there added risks involved? Is the sperm just as healthy as it was before my original vasectomy surgery?

If a male patient has a high DFI (DNA Fragmentation Index) does that increase the risk of miscarriage or genetic problems in the offspring?

Are some sexual positions more conducive to getting pregnant than others?

We were recently told that my husband has Klinefelter’s Syndrome and has zero sperm count in the analyses he’s had done. We’ve been told that there is a 50% chance sperm can be found through a testicular biopsy. Is that accurate? If sperm is found for IVF, would we be able to have a viable pregnancy and healthy baby?

Is male infertility hereditary? My son was conceived through IVF several years ago. We were not able to determine the cause of my husband’s infertility then. I’m worried that whatever caused the infertility may have been passed to my son. Are there genetic tests that can determine if this is the case?

My husband and I really want biological children, but he has sertoli-cell only syndrome. Are there any treatments?

@LaurenSpiceland

Are some sexual positions more conducive to getting pregnant than others?

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From Dr. Trost: I’m not sure if there is a definitive answer to this question. I did a quick literature search to see if anything had ever been published on this, and I was not able to find anything specific. It would seem to make empiric sense to me that the optimal position for the female would be laying on her back as this would increase the amount of time that sperm are present in the correct location near the cervix. It is interesting, however, that sperm are able to travel to the location of the egg within a few minutes of ejaculation. This would argue that the actual position maybe less important than one would think.

@LaurenSpiceland

We were recently told that my husband has Klinefelter’s Syndrome and has zero sperm count in the analyses he’s had done. We’ve been told that there is a 50% chance sperm can be found through a testicular biopsy. Is that accurate? If sperm is found for IVF, would we be able to have a viable pregnancy and healthy baby?

Jump to this post

From Dr. Trost: That is correct. There are some estimates that in up to 66% of patients with Klinefelter Syndrome we are able to retrieve sperm. In these cases I usually recommend that the patient be started on a medicine, such as clomiphene citrate, for several months and then consider undergoing a microscopic testicular sperm extraction. This gives you the optimal chance to find sperm. As long as you can find sperm you should be able to achieve a viable pregnancy. This assumes of course that the female partner is able to achieve a pregnancy (younger and BMI < 30 = better success). Typically in cases like this IVF is not possible and ICSI (intracytoplasmic sperm injection) is preferred. That is because typically we only find a small number of sperm and IVF requires a much larger number.

@LaurenSpiceland

Is male infertility hereditary? My son was conceived through IVF several years ago. We were not able to determine the cause of my husband’s infertility then. I’m worried that whatever caused the infertility may have been passed to my son. Are there genetic tests that can determine if this is the case?

Jump to this post

From Dr. Trost: Some forms of male infertility have clearly been linked to genetic causes. One test that can identify some known causes is looking for Y-chromosome micro deletions. This test is often not covered by insurance and can range from a few hundred dollars to several thousand dollars. I would say, however, that the far majority of causes of male infertility have not been associated with specific genes. Genetics in general is very challenging because there are so many potential genes which may contribute to infertility, and very few of these have actually been fully identified.

Does smoking marijuana cause low sperm count? Is it something that I’d have to quit completely or could I just give it up for a while?

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