Genetic Heart Rhythm Diseases

Welcome to the Genetic Heart Rhythm Diseases page. The Mayo Clinic Windland Smith Rice Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic, with the Windland Smith Rice Sudden Death Genomics Laboratory in Rochester, MN, is dedicated to diagnosing, treating, and researching all types of genetic heart rhythm diseases that can cause sudden death.

Follow the Genetic Heart Rhythm Diseases page and stay up-to-date as we post stories, clinical trials, and useful information regarding your genetic heart rhythm condition.

PUBLIC PAGE
Jul 15 10:00am

Long QT Syndrome: Mayo Clinic Radio

By Katrina Sorensen, Research Coordinator, @katrinasorensen

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Have you ever wondered what exactly long QT syndrome (LQTS) is?

"Long QT syndrome (LQTS) is a heart rhythm condition that can potentially cause fast, chaotic heartbeats. These rapid heartbeats might trigger you to suddenly faint. Some people with the condition have seizures. In some severe cases, LQTS can cause sudden death. "

Check out this video from 2017 when Dr. Michael Ackerman was featured on Mayo Clinic Radio where he discusses long QT syndrome and treatments.

Meet other people talking about genetic heart disorders and COVID-19 on Mayo Clinic Connect. Join the Heart Rhythm Conditions group to join the conversation, share experiences, ask questions, and discover your support network.

For up-to-date information, please follow Dr. Ackerman and the Windland Smith Rice Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic on Twitter by clicking the links below.

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My husband was diagnosed with WPW many years ago. Although it doesn't affect him often, it is frightening when it occurs. No treatment has ever been proposed. Should our children or grandchildren be concerned about this condition? Is it a genetic heart disorder? Thank you.

COMMENT
@odette

My husband was diagnosed with WPW many years ago. Although it doesn't affect him often, it is frightening when it occurs. No treatment has ever been proposed. Should our children or grandchildren be concerned about this condition? Is it a genetic heart disorder? Thank you.

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Hi @odette, welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! The etiology/cause of WPW is still unknown in most situations. However, in a few cases, there is a genetic etiology. It may be beneficial for your husband to discuss his diagnosis with his cardiologist or care team and determine if a referral to a genetic provider would be appropriate. You can learn more about Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome here: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/wolff-parkinson-white-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20354626

You may also be interested in connecting with other people who live with WPW in the Heart Rhythm Conditions group: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/heart-rhythm-conditions/

I hope this helps!

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