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Tue, Jan 21 9:02pm · Shingrix and peripheral neuropathy in Neuropathy

I am glad to help. I must urge caution however. There is a lot of misinformation out there on YouTube. If the video you watched is the one presented by an Asian couple, you may end up doing more harm than good as they have you bending forward – which is what probably caused your problem in the first place. Find the YouTube video titled 'Absolute Best Exercise for Sciatica & Herniated Disc- McKenzie Approach' by two therapists called Bob and Brad. These two are providing legitimate trade knowledge in all of their many videos – the kind that most therapists charge $250 per visit for. (This was grudgingly verified by my brother-in-law who has 30 years experience as a PT.) You want to do the exercises where you bend your back backwards instead of forwards. It's similar to doing a push-up but you leave your entire pelvis down and touching the mat (or bed) while you use your arms to raise your upper body only. Do not use any back muscles for this- the arms do it all. Before you try this though, it is a good idea to first try the following which often helps quickly and is a good way to verify if sciatica is causing your problems. In the above push-up procedure, picture your position when you are raised up fully at the top of the push-up. Now place couch cushions and pillows on your mat or bed and lie down in that position while you watch TV or even read. Do this several times a day for maybe 10 minutes at a time. Adjust the cushion height up or down for comfort but eventually the more height the better. (It feels great to sometimes bend one of my legs off to the side while elevated like this.) If you notice this helps your feet then you are on the right track and you should then include the push-ups in your daily routine. If possible, try directing a flow of very warm water onto your lower back while showering just before you do the above exercises – or even use a heating pad while propped up. Above all you must accept that you may need to do these exercises al least once a day for the rest of your life to keep the devil at bay – but especially after doing things that make your back "go out" (like shoveling snow, or bending forward too much, or lifting things using your back. The idea behind these exercises is to shift the position of the thing (disc??) that is touching the sciatic nerve and keep it off of that nerve. Explore the rest of Bob and Brads videos that deal with sciatica. There is good stuff there. I am throwing a lot at you but I only wish that someone had told me these things when this all started with me. As for the piriformis trigger points – they caused much of my foot burning and numbness until I learned to treat them effectively. They cause the piriformis muscle to "touch" the very same nerve from your lower back (as described above) but they do it in your ass cheek(s). These trigger points are actually small, painful "knots" in any muscle and they cause the muscle to shrink in length but increase in thickness which can then touch the nerve. Finding these painful points is half the battle won. You then rub the painful area directly several times a day using various methods, (which are too involved to get into here.) In my case – after about 10 to 14 days it no longer hurts to rub the trigger point and that's how you know you got the little bugger. Amazingly, you can have trigger points in any muscle or muscles for years and not even know they are there. It's only when you find them by pushing right on them and feeling pain that you know they are there. Various shoulder muscles are a favorite place for them to hide. Best of luck to anybody out there who finds any value in this.-Jim

Mon, Jan 20 12:03pm · Shingrix and peripheral neuropathy in Neuropathy

Yes, I have had improvement. Shingrix did not cause it. In my case – it was from a combination of sciatica due to longstanding lower back dysfunction (probably disc herniation) and the existence of a trigger point in both of my piriformis muscles.(They are in your butt cheeks) I am successfully resolving the symptoms by treating the lower back with what are known as Mckenzie exercises which are a type of physical therapy. But the most relief is occurring from rubbing the piriformis trigger points with a Thera-Cane as described in the excellent book 'THE TRIGGER POINT THERAPY WORKBOOK' 3rd Edition by Clair Davies. Piriformis trigger points can cause all of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy because the piriformis muscle will be pressing on the nerve that goes right to the feet. If you are not diabetic and have developed peripheral neuropathy, I can only urge you to educate yourself on what I have described. Most doctors (especially older ones) have no knowledge or training about trigger points, but some recently graduated do. In my case – it was unfortunate that the symptoms occurred at the same time as when I got the Shingrix vaccine which was obviously purely coincidental. I hope this information will help somebody out there.

Sun, Jan 19 10:57am · Shingrix and peripheral neuropathy in Neuropathy

I originally replied to this post on May 21st 2019 (please read it) where I blamed Shingrix for my newly developed symptoms of peripheral neuropathy. I must now disavow that post and can say that the vaccine did not cause it. In my case – it was from a combination of sciatica due to longstanding lower back dysfunction and the existence of a trigger point in both of my piriformis muscles. I am successfully resolving the symptoms by treating the lower back with what are known as Mckenzie exercises which are a type of physical therapy. But the most relief is occurring from rubbing the piriformis trigger points with a Thera-Cane as described in the excellent book 'THE TRIGGER POINT THERAPY WORKBOOK' 3rd Edition by Clair Davies. Piriformis trigger points can cause all of the symptoms of peripheral neuropathy because the piriformis muscle will be pressing on the nerve that goes right to the feet. If you are not diabetic and have developed peripheral neuropathy, I can only urge you to educate yourself on what I have described. Most doctors (especially older ones) have no knowledge or training about trigger points, but some recently graduated do. In my case – it was unfortunate that the symptoms occurred at the same time as when I got the Shingrix vaccine which was obviously purely coincidental. I hope this information will help somebody out there.

May 24, 2019 · Shingrix and peripheral neuropathy in Neuropathy

Thanks for the kind words Lori. My PCP explained that Shingrix is an extremely 'active' (potential for lots of side-effects) vaccine and that an autoimmune response is always possible. He also said that he thinks that these sensations might eventually go away if they are from the vaccine. My wife got the vaccine at the same time with no problems beyond a very sore arm.

May 21, 2019 · Shingrix and peripheral neuropathy in Neuropathy

I received the 2nd Shingrex dose on February 12, 2019. I am a 62 year old male and do not have diabetes. Two nights later in bed, I experienced intense itching on my legs, feet, arms and hands. A few nights later, I experienced intense "electrical tingling" throughout my body along with nausea and lower abdominal pain. I don't know how else to describe this awful sensation. By morning, it was gone. This quickly evolved into regular daily sensations of burning feet, itching, tingling, or pin pricks of pain in these same locations. I became so alarmed that I made an appt. at the Neurological Dept at the University of Michigan. They listened to my story, did some blood tests, and gave me an MRI of my neck. Their vague diagnosis was either cervical arthritis or inflammation brought on by exercising. They offered no explanation for the leg and foot symptoms. Their recommendation is to start taking Gabapentin and get something called cervical traction from a physical therapist. I did mention to them that I had recently gotten the 2nd Shingrix dose but at that time I had not yet realized that the symptoms started only two days later and they had no reaction in any case. (We only realized this fact last night when we looked at the date of the vaccination). The only side-effect I had from the first dose was an extremely sore arm. It has been just over three months now and my feet are burning as I write this. There are symptoms every day with some days better than others but this has taken the joy out of my life.I will be seeing my PCP in two days. My greatest fear is that this may never go away and i am really just p****d off about this. I realize that it is probably impossible to prove that my symptoms are due to Shingrix but the timing is certainly suspect. I wish I had never heard of Shingrix. – Jim in Michigan