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Mon, Jun 22 3:46pm · 7% Saline Solution in MAC & Bronchiectasis

@macinfo2020 @windwalker Hi! I think Terri put the wrong article up just now for the saline. (The article she posted was meant for a different discussion.) Here are two articles that Terri has posted here about 7 % saline: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4850692/pdf/13104_2016_Article_2054.pdf and https://www.resmedjournal.com/action/showPdf?pii=S0954-6111%2811%2900254-X . I think the charts she was refering to are Tables 2 and 3 in the first (ncbi) article.

Mon, Jun 15 1:56pm · COVID-19 and MAC: What are you doing differently to protect yourself? in MAC & Bronchiectasis

The link to the speech study referenced in the Forbe article above is https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/06/10/2009637117#F2
A more recent Forbes article (https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2020/06/13/face-masks-may-be-the-key-determinant-of-the-covid-19-curve-study-suggests/#100d20006497) lists an epidemiological study that also suggests masks are an important part of mitigation. Here’s the link to that study, published on June 11: https://www.pnas.org/content/early/2020/06/10/2009637117#F2

Mon, Jun 15 12:30pm · COVID-19 and MAC: What are you doing differently to protect yourself? in MAC & Bronchiectasis

Hi again All, masks can help if people talk to each other. I just read this article in Forbes that states, in part: "A new study, however, shows how long speech-generated droplets can linger in the air: not cough- or sneeze-generated droplets, but plain old conversation level emissions. …they can stay airborne for anywhere between eight and 14 minutes." Droplets are much larger than aerosols, and can be stopped by masks. https://www.forbes.com/sites/alicegwalton/2020/05/17/need-proof-that-masks-protect-against-covid-19-study-finds-speech-droplets-can-stay-airborne-for-minutes/#272eb7ab708c

Mon, Jun 15 9:14am · COVID-19 and MAC: What are you doing differently to protect yourself? in MAC & Bronchiectasis

@alleycatkate Hi Kate, I'll read the (I hope) shorter article you just posted. Thanks and Stay safe yourself! Lori

Mon, Jun 15 9:12am · COVID-19 and MAC: What are you doing differently to protect yourself? in MAC & Bronchiectasis

Hi all, thanks for your replies on a VERY long article! 🙂 I agree with you all that every little bit helps. I'll also continue to wear a mask, but be much more cautious about distancing.

Sun, Jun 14 8:12pm · COVID-19 and MAC: What are you doing differently to protect yourself? in MAC & Bronchiectasis

Hi all, a friend just sent me a link to an article by the epidemiologist Michael Osterholm on the effectiveness, or more importantly, ineffectiveness of wearing cloth masks. Distancing remains the best protection: https://www.cidrap.umn.edu/sites/default/files/public/downloads/special_episode_masks_6.2.20_0.pdf

Wed, Jun 3 6:45pm · Two bits of good news!! (and nebulizing with saline) in MAC & Bronchiectasis

@hayn3705 I was diagnosed with mild focal bronchiectasis, nodules, and MAC in 2018 after I coughed up a handful of blood while lap swimming. Other than that, and a morning cough, I have no other symptoms and don't take any antibiotics. My coughing was very non-productive, and I didn't want to have either the bronchiectasis or the MAC to get worse. So, based on what I read here, I decided to try NAC ( 1 or 2 600-mg capsules/day) and nebulizing 7% saline (once a day for two days, then off a day because my prescription was for 60 4ml vials every 3 months). Since I started both, my morning coughing has been much more productive.

Mon, Jun 1 2:28pm · (MAC/MAI) MYCOBACTERIUM AVIUM COMPLEX PULMONARY DISEASE/BRONCHIECTASIS in MAC & Bronchiectasis

@lindam272 Thanks! I did some searching. Microbion suggests it will help those with MAC, as well: "In addition to CF-related lung infection, there are multiple lower respiratory tract infections and conditions where the presence of microbial pathogens and their associated biofilm contribute to lung function decline. Infectious pathogens such as Pseudomonas spp., Staphylococcus spp., Streptococcus spp., Mycobacterium spp., or Haemophilus spp. may contribute to lung diseases such as non-CF bronchiectasis, bronchitis, community- or ventilator-associated pneumonia, non-tuberculous mycobacterium infection, etc., that are expected to benefit from an inhaled application of pravibismane or other Microbion compounds." https://microbioncorp.com/pipeline/respiratory