About

First Name
Ginger

State/Province
CA

Country of Residence
United States of America

Health Interests
Autoimmune diseases, Blood disorders, Chronic pain, Healthy Living, Immune disorders, Kidney and urinary tract disorders, Mental health disorders, Bone, joint, and muscle disorders, Healthy Aging, Other

Posts (869)

3 days ago · When the stuff hits the fan in Caregivers

@debrat1 You know the old saying "we can only do what we can do." You can explain to your family the situation and the symptoms that you see now and the possibility of additional things in the future. You can encourage them to accept it and to help you as you go through this journey, as they will certainly go along with you. But you can't force them; we can't force anybody. We can only offer them the information and the tools. What they choose to do with it becomes their decision.

I find this discussion so interesting. My husband's health after his kidney transplant three years ago is much better than mine is at this time. My issues are all autoimmune related. I know the distinct possibilities for the future and each day I I'm grateful to be here and have the health that I have for that day. My husband looks through rose-colored glasses and figures "we'll deal with it as it comes up". I want to consider the possibilities beforehand, and be prepared.
Ginger

4 days ago · Recipes, Food Tips, Healthy Eating & More in Just Want to Talk

@parus By golly, that sounds great, and healthy!
Ginger

4 days ago · Switching anti-depressants in Depression & Anxiety

@sped1 Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. After that long on one medication your body has probably gotten pretty used to it and how it works with your system. Now as you start to titrate off of it and add another one in your body is coming to attention and asking you "hey, what's up!" My opinion is to check with your doctor and find out from him what side effects you might expect to see and let him know what you are truly experiencing. Keep a journal, a written record of your withdrawal symptoms and how you are feeling each day. This will be very valuable for your doctor to be able to review and also for you to document and see for yourself when you actually do start to feel better. There may be a very slow decrease of the one medication needed in order to adjust your body to accepting a new one. This is just my humble opinion. I was only ever on one antidepressant and then I titrated myself off of it over the course of two and a half months.
Ginger

4 days ago · Alzheimers: When should someone not be left alone? in Caregivers

@sallysue As @IndianaScott said, there is a whole host of manifestations! For my mother, there was no hostility, basically she just shut down. She had a combination of Alzheimer's and Dementia and became pretty much mute for the last several years of her life. She stopped driving about 8 yrs before her death. She would sometimes eat if you put food in front of her otherwise you had to feed her. She slept a lot. She would sit in a chair and just look out at things; it was one of those "lights are on but nobody's home" type of expressions on her face. [A sad story here. My mother was a lifelong smoker, even though she supposedly tried to quit several times. My father continued to light cigarettes and give them to her. Some little remote corner of her mind knew to smoke those cigarettes. A year after she had passed, as he was moving out of their house, he found several cigarettes that had been lit but slipped out of her hand and apparently rolled under the couch. In his grief and sorrow his comment was, "I never knew about these. I wonder if God told me it wasn't time yet and he let them burn out rather them starting a fire." My heart just had to break for him at that comment.
Ginger

4 days ago · Alzheimers: When should someone not be left alone? in Caregivers

@debrat1 Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! We're glad you're here. I guess it can be both intimidating and enlightening to know that you have that gene. And that it might or might not cause you problems in the future to a greater degree than what you already recognized can be scary, am I right? Like @IndianaScott said, it's so important that family recognizes the issues. For my mother, she and my dad lived quite a distance away and I rarely saw them. On the times that I did I could really see what was going on. Please come back here and let us know more about yourself and let us know how we can help you.
Ginger

4 days ago · Recipes, Food Tips, Healthy Eating & More in Just Want to Talk

You all are making me hungry all this talk about fresh veggies and roasting and all. I have never been much of one for roasting vegetables usually just seem them and then season with a no salt multi herb seasoning. Think I might have to try this!
Ginger

4 days ago · Sleep without trazadone in Sleep Health

@mommabird74 This was 20 years ago. At that time they had a concern about my family history of breast cancer on maternal side. Beyond that since I have experienced hot flashes since I was a teenager, there would be no guarantee that HRT would end those hot flashes. Along with some other health concerns it was low on my priority list to have HRT. Hope this helps you! BTW I still have hot flashes but not quite so severe.
Ginger

4 days ago · Diagnosed with stage 5 kidney disease, but feel fine in Kidney & Bladder

@carrikerge Let me add my welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect! We're glad that you found us. Kidney disease is pretty dang sneaky. It often is a slow progression. We learn to accommodate to it and live with it without realizing how it may be affecting us overall. That might be what has happened with your brother-in-law. He has gotten used to how he feels and the slow decline in the quality of life hasn't made a big impression on him. At Stage 5 kidney disease kidney issues can suddenly raise their heads and crash the body. Just like the old saying, "you can lead a horse…" you can offer your brother-in-law sources of information, but until he's ready to understand the severity of his condition there may not be much that he'll do to address it. Please come back and let us know what we can do to help you, support you and offer resources for your brother-in-law
Ginger