Badges (2)

About

Member has chosen to not make this information public.

Pages

Member not yet following any Pages.

Posts (248)

Mon, May 25 8:20pm · HER2 positive & HER2 negative: I have both at the same time in Breast Cancer

@rraw
Thankfully, you have access to Duke University Medical Center which has excellent providers to recommend appropriate treatments. I remember being told that, although I was HER2+ when first diagnosed, any recurrence could be positive or negative. I didn't envision your situation, however. Although I'm absolutely no help, you have taught me something new… which is one of the purposes of this forum, I guess, and for that I thank you.

Mon, May 25 5:44pm · HER2 positive & HER2 negative: I have both at the same time in Breast Cancer

@rraw
Wow! Do tell us about the circumstances… two different tumors? What treatment/s did your oncologist recommend under the circumstances?

Sun, May 17 5:00pm · Aromatase Inhihibitors: Did you decide to go on them or not? in Breast Cancer

@saucy Have you considered genetic testing?

Sun, May 17 12:36pm · Aromatase Inhihibitors: Did you decide to go on them or not? in Breast Cancer

I found the following article of interest, published in the medical journal Lancet last December:

"The benefits of the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole for breast cancer prevention in high-risk postmenopausal women extend well beyond the five-year treatment period, according to long-term data from the International Breast Cancer Intervention Study II (IBIS-II) Prevention trial.

"The new data were featured at a press briefing today at the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium and simultaneously published in The Lancet.

"Five years of treatment carries on producing continuing benefits right out to 12 years," study cochair Dr. Jack Cuzick of the Centre for Cancer Prevention, Wolfson Institute of Preventive Medicine, Queen Mary University London, said during the briefing.

"From 2003 to 2012, the study enrolled 3,864 postmenopausal women at high risk for breast cancer; 1,920 were randomly assigned to anastrozole (1 mg/day) and 1,944 to placebo for five years, with similar adherence rates (75% for anastrozole and 77% for placebo).

"Results reported in 2013, after a median follow-up of five years, showed a 61% reduction in new breast cancers (from 4.6% with placebo to 1.8% with anastrozole), and a number needed to treat to prevent one breast cancer in the first five years of 36, Dr. Cuzick reported.

"The new long-term data show there continues to be a "significant" 36% reduction in new cancers in years five to 12 (4.4% in women who took placebo five years vs 3.5% in those who took anastrozole), he said. "This is statistically significant in its own right, and although numerically less than in the active treatment period, not significantly so," he added.

"Over the entire 12-year period, there is a 49% risk reduction with five years of anastrozole (from 8.8% with placebo to 5.3% with anastrozole), with a number needed to treat over that 12-year period of 29, "which is substantially bigger than seen with tamoxifen at this stage, where the number needed to treat was 49 to prevent one breast cancer," Dr. Cuzick noted.

"No excess of fractures, other cancers, cardiovascular disease or major adverse events was seen in the extended follow-up."

Thu, May 14 6:15pm · Radioactive blue dye injected to the breast for lymph node dissection in Breast Cancer

@trixie1313 I have no memory of the needle's entry point (I likely had my eyes closed….) but it was all over in a flash.

Thu, May 14 2:54pm · Radioactive blue dye injected to the breast for lymph node dissection in Breast Cancer

@trixie1313 @kathyomaha55
Hi, Kathy and Trixie. I had a wonderful surgeon for my lumpectomy, and when I was preparing for the surgery, I had read about how painful the sulfur colloid tracer injection was… so I furthered my research. What I discovered was that an adjacent regional hospital used a different tracer (Lymphoseek) since 2015-16. That hospital contended that it was far superior in patient comfort. I presented my surgeon with pages of research information on Lymphoseek, and she demanded that our hospital use it for me. Yes, it's a bit more expensive, and radiologists have to wait a bit longer for the subsequent pictures of it taking hold, but it was not at all painful to me. Thought you might be interested.

Mon, May 11 10:33am · Telemedicine: How to make the most of a virtual doctor visit in COVID-19

@artscaping No, Chris… just alerting that patients shouldn't be tempted to record on their end (which is an option on the Zoom screen).