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Thu, Oct 11 1:33pm · Forefront: The Latest Edition of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Magazine in Cancer Education Center

@mlmcg

Thank you for sharing your story with us. As you read the information in Forefront, I hope you are comforted by the ongoing research and state-of-the art treatment in cancer and medicine. As a cancer survivor, I hope you continue to share your story and the impact it had on you and your family.

Tue, Oct 9 6:00am · Forefront: The Latest Edition of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Magazine in Cancer Education Center

Forefront

The Fall 2018 issue of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center magazine, Forefront, has arrived. Features include brief news articles about Mayo Clinic Cancer Center research, video commentary from researchers, and investigator profiles. Click here to subscribe, read this newsletter edition or view any archives.

Volume 7, Issue 3, September 2018

Director’s message: Speeding up the pace of cancer research
Sobering statistics about ovarian cancer underscore the need to quickly develop novel therapies.

Mayo researchers a step closer to DNA test for liver cancer
The confirmation of abnormal markers may pave the way for a blood test for primary liver cancer.

Breast cancer survivors aren’t getting recommended mammograms
Post-surgery screening mammography rates miss the mark, especially for African-American women.

Finding may lead to personalized ovarian, brain cancer therapy
Researchers discovered a molecular communication pathway has a key role in oncolytic virus therapy.

Potential new treatment for triple negative breast cancer ID’d
Results from the BEAUTY study show that the drug decitabine had an effect at a low therapeutic dose.

New technology overcomes false-positives in CT for lung cancer
Researchers used radiomics to test variables to distinguish a benign nodule from a cancerous nodule.

Mayo Clinic joins network to improve access to clinical trials
A partnership for the Cancer Center and Mayo Clinic Health System reduces travel burdens for patients.

Meet the investigator: Roxana S. Dronca, M.D.
In this video, Dr. Dronca, a hematologist-oncologist, discusses her research on tumor immunology.

Thu, Jun 28 2:35pm · Forefront: The Latest Edition of Mayo Clinic Cancer Center Magazine in Cancer Education Center

Forefront

The Summer 2018 issue of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center magazine, Forefront, has arrived. Features include brief news articles about Mayo Clinic Cancer Center research, video commentary from researchers, and investigator profiles. Click here to subscribe, read this newsletter edition or view any archives.

Volume 7, Issue 2, June 2018

Director’s message: Our rich tradition of cancer research
Advances in clinical research and basic research translate to improvements in patient care.

Predicting which colon polyps might transform to cancer
This discovery would be a major clinical step forward in individualizing patient care.

New test links BRCA2 gene mutations to breast, ovarian cancer
The findings may help patients make better decisions about results obtained from genetic testing.

MGUS poses lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma
Patients should be checked for progression and receive all routine preventive services as they age.

Late biostatistician’s plan for clinical trial bears fruit
Results from the IDEA colon cancer study show that patients may be able to reduce chemotherapy.

Immunity-boosting vaccine targets aggressive breast cancer
Future studies will help determine the duration of immunity in HER2 and identify tumor subtypes.

Meet the Investigator: Stephen M. Ansell, M.D., Ph.D.
In this video, Dr. Ansell, a hematologist, discusses his research on lymphoma biology and treatment.

Fri, Jun 1 11:55am · Early Cancer Therapeutics Group and Clinical Trials at Mayo Clinic in Cancer Education Center

shutterstock_174168614

The Early Cancer Therapeutics Group within the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center provides access to the most current phase I clinical trials available from Mayo Clinic researchers, pharmaceutical companies and the National Cancer Institute. These trials are offered at all three Mayo Clinic campuses in Arizona, Florida, and Minnesota.

Phase I trials are designed to study the safety of the new treatment. In contrast, later phases of clinical trials – phase II and III – seek to determine the effectiveness of the new treatment while also still continuing to study its safety.

At the time of this publishing, Mayo Clinic is currently offering 46 phase I studies among our three Mayo Clinic sites. You can search the list of phase I clinical trials offered at Mayo Clinic.

You can also search our listing of all cancer clinical trials offered through our Cancer Center at Mayo Clinic by typing in your search terms and/or using the filters on the left side of the page. In addition, you can contact the Mayo Clinic Cancer Clinical Trials Referral Office toll-free at 855- 776-0015 for assistance in searching for Mayo Clinic Cancer Clinical Trials or completing the clinical trials request form.

Adult patients who have not responded to standard treatment options and are interested in phase I trials at Mayo Clinic should plan to be evaluated in our Early Therapeutics Group for an initial consultation at any of our three Mayo Clinic sites in Arizona, Florida, or Minnesota. At the appointment, a specialist will discuss potential trial opportunities, may conduct initial test to screen for eligibility, and discuss more details of a study in which you may be eligible. If, at the time of the consultation, we do not offer a study in which the cancer patient is eligible, the patients name will be placed on a wait-list.

All cancer patients should feel free to talk to your cancer medical specialist about all treatment options including clinical trials. A referral to Mayo Clinic is helpful but not always necessary. Also, be sure to check with your insurance plan to make sure you understand you coverage as it relates to the Mayo Clinic site in which you are interested in pursuing an appointment.

Have you received care as part of a clinical trial? What has been your experience? We would appreciate hearing from you.

Sun, May 6 12:31am · "Brunch on the Farm" National Cancer Survivors Day - Rochester, Minnesota in Cancer Education Center

NCSD

“Brunch on the Farm” – Celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day – Sunday, June 3, 2018!

Cancer survivors, their families and friends are invited to a celebration of life during the annual National Cancer Survivors Day Event on Sunday, June 3, 2018 – NCSD2018.pdf.

Every year, this event is a wonderful day filled with hope, inspiration and friendship as we honor people whose lives have been touched by cancer. Join us this year for our themed celebration “Brunch on the Farm”. The event will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 3 at the Rochester International Event Center (located near the airport) at 7333 Airport View Dr. SW, Rochester, Minnesota.

Registration, family activities, petting zoo and live music starts at 10:30 a.m., brunch provided at 11:00 a.m., followed by a program to honor cancer survivors and their families.

Activities for kids throughout the event!

The event is sponsored by the André Gauthier Foundation and hosted by Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and the American Cancer Society. Admission is free for cancer survivors and two guests. Additional guests are welcome to attend for a nominal fee of $5 per person.

Reservations are required by May 25, 2018.

Register after May 1, by calling the Mayo Clinic Cancer Education Program at (507) 538-6001 or Email: canceredprog@mayo.edu

Fri, Apr 27 12:47pm · "Brunch on the Farm" National Cancer Survivors Day - Rochester, Minnesota in Cancer Education Center

“Brunch on the Farm” – Celebrate National Cancer Survivors Day – Sunday, June 3, 2018!

Cancer survivors, their families and friends are invited to a celebration of life during the annual National Cancer Survivors Day Event on Sunday, June 3, 2018 – NCSD2018.pdf.

Every year, this event is a wonderful day filled with hope, inspiration and friendship as we honor people whose lives have been touched by cancer. Join us this year for our themed celebration “Brunch on the Farm”. The event will be held from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 3 at the Rochester International Event Center (located near the airport) at 7333 Airport View Dr. SW, Rochester, Minnesota.

Registration, family activities, petting zoo and live music starts at 10:30 a.m., brunch provided at 11:00 a.m., followed by a program to honor cancer survivors and their families.

Activities for kids throughout the event!

The event is sponsored by the André Gauthier Foundation and hosted by Mayo Clinic Cancer Center and the American Cancer Society. Admission is free for cancer survivors and two guests. Additional guests are welcome to attend for a nominal fee of $5 per person.

Reservations are required by May 25, 2018.

Register after May 1, by calling the Mayo Clinic Cancer Education Program at (507) 538-6001 or Email: canceredprog@mayo.edu

Tue, Apr 3 11:24am · Mayo Clinic Cancer Research Updates in Cancer Education Center

Forefront E-Edition

The Spring 2018 issue of the Mayo Clinic Cancer Center magazine, Forefront, has arrived. Features include brief news articles about Mayo Clinic Cancer Center research, video commentary from researchers, and investigator profiles. Click here to subscribe, read this newsletter edition or view any archives.

Director’s message: Springtime and hope are in bloom
New treatments like CAR T-cell therapy are revolutionizing options for patients with cancer.

Emojis show promise as quality-of-life tracking tool
Electronic emoji scales and wearable technology have the potential to improve patient care.

Researchers pinpoint barriers to transplant therapy for multiple myeloma
A large analysis of sociodemographic factors uncovered significant disparities among races receiving stem cell transplants.

Activity improves survival in lymphoma patients
A new study shows that doctors should encourage lymphoma patients to increase their physical activity after diagnosis.

Proton beam therapy may be better for older esophageal cancer patients
Death rates and heart and lung problems were higher with standard treatments, researchers found.

Good results for contrast-enhanced digital mammography
This imaging procedure may be a faster, more accessible and less costly option than breast MRI.

Mayo Clinic offers CAR T-cell therapy for lymphoma
This new immunotherapy is for certain patients who have relapsed or haven’t responded to multiple treatments.

Meet the investigator: Amylou C. Dueck, Ph.D.
In this video, Dr. Dueck discusses her work as a biostatistician at Mayo Clinic.

Wed, Mar 7 9:46am · Colorectal Cancer: Screening Can Save Your Life in Cancer Education Center

CRC Awareness Month
Of the cancers that effect both men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Yet, did you know this colorectal cancer is highly preventable through screening? Unfortunately, one in three adults over the age of 50 is not being screened. Not only does screening find cancer early when treatment can be most effective, but it can literally save your life.

The colon (also known as the large intestine) is about five to six feet long, beginning at the cecum and ending with the anus. The last five to ten inches of the colon is called the rectum. Cancer found in the large intestine (colon) is called colon cancer. Cancer found in the rectum is known as rectal cancer. Colorectal cancer is the term referring to both types of cancer.

Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps that, over time, can become cancers. Polyps can be small and cause little, and maybe even no symptoms, so screening tests are recommended at regular intervals to help prevent colon cancer and to find and remove polyps before becoming cancerous.

Colon Image

Signs and symptoms of colorectal cancer can include:

  • A change in your bowel habits, including diarrhea or constipation or a change in the consistency of your stool, that lasts longer than four weeks.
  • Bleeding or blood in your stool.
  • Persistent abdominal discomfort, such as cramps, gas or pain.
  • A feeling that your bowel doesn’t empty completely.
  • Weakness or fatigue.
  • Unexplained weight loss.

Many people with colon cancer experience no symptoms in the early stages of the disease. When symptoms appear, they usually vary from person to person, depending on the cancer’s size and location within the large intestine – ranging anywhere from the beginning of the colon (cecum) to its end (rectum).

If you notice any symptoms of colorectal cancer, make an appointment with your healthcare provider. Also, talk to your provider about when you should begin screening for colon cancer. Guidelines generally recommend that colorectal cancer screenings begin at age 50. Your provider may recommend more frequent or earlier screening if you have other risk factors, such as a family history of the disease.

Colorectal cancer screening tests include one or a combination of these screening methods. You healthcare provider will recommend which test(s) are appropriate for your situation:

  • Colonoscopy
  • Fecal occult blood testing (FOBT)
  • Fecal immunochemical testing (FIT)
  • Stool DNA testing
  • Sigmoidoscopy
  • Computed tomography colonography (virtual colonoscopy)

To kick off March as National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month, Mayo Clinic is participating in a social media campaign to raise awareness about colorectal cancer and the importance of screening and early detection to save lives. Videos have been produced featuring Mayo Clinic experts providing usable information on a range of topics related to prevention, diagnosis and treatment of colorectal cancer. These short and insightful videos, along with additional information about colorectal cancer, can be found on Mayo Clinic Connect. The goal is to create awareness about screening. If you can, do your part and encourage friends and family to discuss colorectal cancer screening with their healthcare provider.

In general, what can you do lower your risk for colorectal cancer?

  • Know your family medical history and talk to your provider about colorectal cancer screening.
  • If you’re aged 50 to 75, get screened. If you’re between 76 and 85, talk to your doctor to determine if you should be screened.
  • Be physically active. At least 150 minutes per week of moderate activity.
  • Maintain a healthy weight.
  • Drink alcohol in moderation.
  • Do not smoke.

Have you been screened for colorectal cancer? What has been your experience?