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Tue, Jul 2 6:00am · Summertime Mediterranean Diet Recipes in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

grilled salmon

As you prepare to celebrate Independence Day, many of you may be planning on hosting or attending a social gathering involving the grill! Barbecues or cook-outs are part of the summer social scene for many of us, and while they are more often associated with burgers and hot dogs than salmon and veggies, there’s no reason you can’t make the menu delicious AND healthy.  As we have mentioned in past blog posts, the Mediterranean Diet is a style of eating that has shown benefits to the health of the brain. It seems like it’s about time we shared a couple of new recipes to get your summer off to a good start. The following recipes come from the Mayo Clinic Healthy Recipes website.

This easy recipe for Mediterranean Style Grilled Salmon is a great main dish that could be featured at your next barbecue.

Ingredients

  • 4 tablespoons chopped fresh basil
  • 1 tablespoon chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tablespoon minced garlic
  • 2 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 4 salmon fillets, each 5 ounces
  • Cracked black pepper, to taste
  • 4 green olives, chopped
  • 4 thin slices lemon

Attending a potluck style barbecue? Consider bringing this Bean Salad with Balsamic Vinaigrette. Chances are good that others will appreciate the healthy option to balance out their plate!

Ingredients

For the vinaigrette:

  • 2 tablespoons balsamic vinegar
  • 1/3 cup fresh parsley, chopped
  • 4 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • Ground black pepper, to taste
  • 1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

For the salad:

  • 1 can (15 ounces) low-sodium garbanzo beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 can (15 ounces) low-sodium black beans, rinsed and drained
  • 1 medium red onion, diced
  • 6 lettuce leaves
  • 1/2 cup celery, finely chopped

Hopefully these recipes are just a jumping off point for you to get excited about ways to make your summer eating give your brain the nutrients it needs.

Give these recipes a try and post below to let us know how you liked them!

 

Wed, Jun 26 8:59am · Repost: How Big was that Fish? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

@dorisena – good tip on avoiding becoming engaged in an argument and learning to "step away" in those situations. Sounds like you've encountered more than your fair share of challenging caregiving situations. Thank you for sharing your experiences with others!

Mon, Apr 8 11:07am · What’s the Difference Between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Dementia? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

@dorisena – thank you for your comments and willingness to share your experiences with others in the group.

Mon, Apr 8 11:05am · What’s the Difference Between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Dementia? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

Great resources, @colleenyoung – I would add that in general, if you feel your safety is compromised, physically leave the situation immediately and call 911.

Mon, Apr 8 11:01am · What’s the Difference Between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Dementia? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

@parus It can be tough to ask questions at an appointment, especially with a computer seeming to take up the provider's attention, but it's so important to be an advocate for yourself and speak up! It may be helpful to write down your questions in advance and mention early in the appointment that you brought a list of questions. If you are noticing cognitive changes that concern you, let your provider know, and ask if a neuropsychological evaluation (or updated evaluation, if you have not had one in a year) would be indicated.

Mon, Apr 8 9:21am · What’s the Difference Between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Dementia? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

@lbrockmeier @debbraw beat me to it – she gives a lot of good suggestions, including finding a neurologist who you feel confident in. Geriatric Medicine providers can be a wonderful resource, as well.

Wed, Apr 3 3:22pm · What’s the Difference Between Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI) and Dementia? in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

@debbraw – Good questions! The "milestones" of progression from MCI to dementia can be subtle from day to day, so you are spot on in your analogy of this being like the aging process. For healthcare providers, who see the patient every 6 months or every year, changes appear a bit more pronounced. What many of us tend to hone in on is how the person is functioning in daily life. Usually, when MCI progresses, we hear about a patient having had some mishaps with medication management, bill paying, cooking, or driving tasks, to the point that family members have stepped in and taken over some or all of those things. Essentially, that loss of function is a symptom of cognitive difficulties getting worse, with progression of the underlying disease. You are also right that dementia has stages (mild, moderate, severe). I'd suggest taking a look at the Alzheimer's Association website resources for more info on that (https://www.alz.org/alzheimers-dementia/stages).