Webinar: What Women Need to Know about Ovarian Cancer

Tue, May 12
12:00pm to 1:00pm ET

Description

Mayo Clinic gynecologic cancer specialists Jamie N. Bakkum-Gamez, M.D. and John Weroha, M.D., Ph.D. discuss the signs and symptoms women should be aware of for detection of ovarian cancer, understanding treatment options, and the importance of new clinical trials. Mayo Clinic medical geneticist Myra J. Wick, M.D., Ph.D. discusses the importance of family history and genetic counseling in preventing ovarian cancer. A live question and answer session followed the presentation. You can still ask questions using the chat box to the right. Speakers include: - Jamie N. Bakkum-Gamez, M.D. - John Weroha, M.D., Ph.D. - Myra J. Wick, M.D., Ph.D. Would you like to: Request An Appointment Learn More About Ovarian Cancer

Location

Online
@ellenhanlon

41 yr old-if I decided to have fallopian tube and ovary removal due to genetic testing results, did I miss the window? why is the recommendation between the ages of 35-40? is this still a benefit to have performed in 40’s?

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Yes, recommend risk reducing bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy

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@melissarvh

How can I distinguish symptoms of ovarian cancer from possible gastrointestinal conditions (with similar symptoms)? I have been told that ovarian cancer is sometimes misdiagnosed as a gastrointestinal disorder.

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The symptoms of ovarian cancer are vague and can include GI symptoms. In order to fully work up symptoms, imaging (CT scan) and GI assessment (often a colonoscopy and sometimes an EGD) are often recommended. Occasionally a diagnostic laparoscopy is considered if symptoms such as pelvic/abdominal pain persist.

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@camdamiller

With 2 sisters with Ovarian cancer and a third one with Breast, will I be eligible to do the gene testing and be covered by insurance?

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Will depend on insurance. Many of the commercials labs have prior authorization process. The lab will contact you with out of pocket cost after testing is ordered. If out of pocket cost is prohibitive, testing can be cancelled.

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@above

Please share your latest research on best preventing ovarian cancer from recurring (non hereditary, stage 3B after major hysterectomy))

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At Mayo there is currently a vaccine trial open (MC1361; clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02111941) for women who have completed radical surgery, chemotherapy and have no evidence of active cancer. For more details, please visit: http://www.mayo.edu/research/clinical-trials/cls-20110798.

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@above

Please share your latest research on best preventing ovarian cancer from recurring (non hereditary, stage 3B after major hysterectomy))

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We are also in the process of opening a phase III clinical trial (GOG 3005) that would randomize women to receive a PARP inhibitor during their initial chemotherapy. One-third of the women on that study will continue the PARP inhibitor as maintenance after they have completed chemotherapy. This trial will be open for women with newly-diagnosed ovarian cancer.

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@camdamiller

I am looking into the NY-ESO-1 trial. Can you tell me anything about how that is administered and if I can have it done locally?

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This trial is open at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. It is open at other institutions as well. Details on this clinical trial can be found at: http://www.mayo.edu/research/clinical-trials/cls-20111785 and at: https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02122861?term=ID-LV305-2013-001&rank=1.

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@pwojick

I had Stage 3C ovarian cancer at 53, almost 5 years ago. I did not test positive for for any of more than 22 genes, but my husband has two aunts who had cancer, one breast, one ovarian. We don’t know if they carried any of the genes. Could my husband carry a gene that we should be concerned about? We have a daughter and son. Is there gene testing for males?

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Males can undergo genetic testing. Consultation with a genetic counselor will help guide whether he should be tested and what tests to do.

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@danmhaye

My sister had surgery at Mayo last week. It was too large and involved to remove and the oncologist is recommending traditional chemo which she is scheduled for at Mayo. Is she a candidate for the ovatar trial?

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This is a very good question. The short answer is “maybe”. However, the first step for any patient is to sign consent for the Mayo Clinic ovarian cancer tissue repository PRIOR to surgery. This is key. With this, the answer is “maybe”. Without this, the answer is “no”. For this reason, and countless others, I would encourage any willing patient to participate in the repository if approached by the team. There is one caveat. The challenge with trying to make an Ovatar from a tumor that has already been exposed to chemotherapy is that it can be more difficult to grow in the lab. It is essentially ‘crippled’ from the chemo, which is good for the patient, but bad for the Ovatar. That said, if you signed consent, we will make the attempt.

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@lmauroorlandino

Can you talk about vaccine clinical trials.

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At Mayo there is currently a vaccine trial open (MC1361; clinicaltrials.gov identifier: NCT02111941) for women who have completed radical surgery, chemotherapy and have no evidence of active cancer. For more details, please visit: http://www.mayo.edu/research/clinical-trials/cls-20110798).

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@andersonrau

Signs / symptoms are not real specific and can easily be related to many other diagnoses… I’ve been experiencing both bloating and urgency/frequency in urination for quite some time… when I go in for my dr appoint – do I offer this up as something to be considered?

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Yes. Ovarian cancer symptoms can be vague even in advanced disease. Let your doctor know about your concerns.

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@lsudoublep

My mother was just diagnosed with a second recurrence, however is relatively asymptomatic (small nodule growth in mesenteric fat area)….we have been told that a hormonal therapy option might be a way to keep it stable for a bit (to delay going on chemo again)…have you used this before and if so, do you favor tamoxifen or femara?

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Your oncologist has probably pointed out that hormonal therapies as single-agents have limited activity. I typically do not use these drugs in ovarian cancer. That said, I agree with the philosophy that we should not let the treatment be worse than the disease. If there are no symptoms, there is no rush to start chemotherapy. Tamoxifen or femara treatments are generally well tolerated and if cost isn’t an issue, you might prefer this treatment over watchful-waiting.
If your mother is able to travel and is interested in a trial, we are combining letrozole (hormone blocker) with everolimus (a drug that we hope will prevent resistance to letrozole) in ovarian cancer patients who have ER-positive tumors. More information is available at
https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/study/NCT02283658

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@peggycampbell327

Do men get the BRCA 1/2 genetic testing if their mother had ovarian cancer but she did not have genetic testing?

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Yes. However, testing is most informative when done on an affected family member. There may be difficulties with insurance coverage in this situation.

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