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artificialsugar (@artificialsugar)

Trying to understand seizures

Epilepsy & Seizures | Last Active: Jul 29 11:53am | Replies (16)

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@santosha

Hi @jakeduck1, Good Morning

Thanks for sharing your experience and opinions!!!
I agree with you, it is very important to accept our condition and live accordingly. Not accepting it brings turbulences and just turns things more difficult. Again it is easier to say than to practice it. I got quite angry when I got diagnosed some years ago, at the age of 48 years. The progress of the disease, hard times during several treatments, and the way I have reacted to it have limited my life to epilepsy. But with the support of my neuropsychologist, I have today a better acceptance of it. We are much more than the bad things that have happened to us!
Those who have prejudice around people with epilepsy should be the ones to be ashamed! Who has limitations? We or people that cannot see the other and have no compassion? As a famous Brazilian chef has said (his daughter was born with epilepsy): “ You are a very special daughter who teaches me a lot. You are a great fortress, an example for everyone. Never give up on being the best you can be. Because you have been doing that since the day you were born”.
However, I confess I continue to hide my condition from certain people, those who I know have little compassion and could hurt me a lot. I am not that strong yet. Still, I agree when you say “I believe those who hide their condition do so out of shame and embarrassment and thereby perpetuate the Epilepsy stigma to continue.” Hope to be able one day to be 100% honest about my condition, not hiding it from anyone. Once I have heard that we give others the authority to mess with us. This is somehow true.

“We cannot choose what happens to us, but we can choose how to react to the experiences” Edith Eger (author of The Choice).

Lots of santoshas (contentments) to all of you!

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Replies to "Hi @jakeduck1, Good Morning Thanks for sharing your experience and opinions!!! I agree with you, it..."

@santosha
Thank you for your response.
I know what your saying about how much more difficult it is to say than to put it into practice.

The stigma and discrimination that encompasses epilepsy are frequently more overwhelming than the seizures are. People with epilepsy are often targets of prejudice. Not only can the stigma of the condition prevent job opportunities but also discourage people from seeking medical treatment. Some people are unable to admit to themselves they have Epilepsy. I can understand why they want to avoid becoming identified with the condition. I knew a policeman who refused to tell the department or anyone else he had Epilepsy. He was a motorcycle officer and had he told he would have lost his drivers license. He should’ve known more than anyone how important it was to disclose his condition but he never came to terms In the United States of America, until the 1970s, it was legal to deny people with seizures access to restaurants, theatres, recreational centres and other public buildings. his seizures.

In the U.S. until the 1970s, it was legal to deny people with seizures access to restaurants, theatres, recreational centres and other public buildings.
In India we are not allowed to drive even if seizures are controlled.
In China and India people with Epilepsy can forbid marriages and have marriages annulled.
In India only one seizure prevents residents from driving for life.
People in Great Britain revoked the annulment in 1971.
Demon possession is still a widely held belief especially in Asia.
Jake

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