← Return to Do hearing aids damage ears? Is the helping hurting in the long run?

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@bobbyboomer

I started thinking about this because I've always been conscious about the sound level reaching my ears. If I can help it, nothing over 85dba gets in.

We need amplification to hear the things we can't hear anymore, and that's a good thing.

However, if the helping is hurting us in the long run, it isn't quite as good as it seems, now is it?

So far Oticon hasn't answered.

I did find this spec sheet, and if I read it right, they hearing aids might damage your ears. However I don't really know how to interpret the chart, I could be misreading it.

(right click and open in new tab will keep you from losing this page)
https://www.oticon.com/-/media/oticon-us/main/download-center/opn/product-information/179074us_td_opn1-2-3_minirite-minirite-t_105.pdf
It seems that if the full on gain is 72db and the source is 70dba than the output at that frequency would be142dba. But like I said, I'm not sure I'm interpreting that correctly.

If there is a hearing pro on this board, please tell me if I'm reading this right or wrong,

This might help, I'm going to dive into both charts more thoroughly

(right click and open in new tab will keep you from losing this page)
https://www.amperordirect.com/pc/help-hearing-aid/z-hearing-aid-specs.html
Bob

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Replies to "I started thinking about this because I've always been conscious about the sound level reaching my..."

Bob, one website that I've found useful is hearingtracker.com. There is a lot of information but the forum is a place to ask questions and get answers from audiologists. I would think they would be able to tell you if you're interpreting those dB charts correctly.

Assuming we are talking about modern digital aids (analog aids acted much like you suggest) then they will (should) be set up to amplify less when the incoming sound is louder. They also have a cut off threshold above which they will not go, your aid can't get to 142 dba, it can't.

Also, and this is where you need to talk to a knowledgeable Audiologist (I went through 6 trying to find the one I have now), the whole thing is a lot more complicated then just trying to add a reverse curve. Once sound reaches a threshold where we can hear it then, in general we hear as well (some suggest better then) normal. We may not understand, but that is due to issues other then volume. So in your example, with a 70 db loss and a 75 db conversation should be hearable, the loss is not a subtraction but a threshold. Now you may not be able to understand it but that is more likely a signal to noise issue, which is best solved with an assisted listening device.

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