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CL (@lelia)

Fructose Malabsorption

Digestive Health | Last Active: Jul 28, 2020 | Replies (263)

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@lelia

VERY LOW FRUCTOSE, LOW FODMAPS, AND GLUTEN FREE RECIPES AND DIET – SUPPLEMENTS AND DRUGS
Since the diet is so narrow, I also take calcium carbonate powder (NOW brand) or tablet (365 brand). Note that calcium carbonate is just as absorbable as calcium citrate (which has sugars – citrus- in it) if you take it with food according to one doctor, and my labs are normal for calcium. Also take Vit D3 2200 I.U. capsule (Solar), multivitamin/mineral (365 Age 50+ Multi Iron Free), and vitamin B complex (Naturemade Super B Complex.) I realize what I take may not work for everyone since we are all different, but this gives a start. Other supplements: L-glutamine (bulksupplements.com or Nutrabio.com), lactase (Lactaid Fast Act), probiotic (Flora Advanced adults Probiotic Seven Senior Specific Strains), and Phillips Milk of Magnesia. L-glutamine is supposed to heal the intestine; I use it as a maintenance dose. The same for the probiotic. Regarding the Phillips, I have the constipation version of fm, and use 4 T every 2d or 3rd day. I believe the food poisoning left me with a sluggish digestive system because I also need the prescription drug Creon for the pancreas even though it checks out normal. Tried stopping it and there was a noticeable difference. Also take a compounded drug, ketotifen, which I also tried stopping and realized I still need. Ketotifen is supposed to quiet the mast cells in the gut and it helps. My medical librarian found this for me (among many other things). Also take sucralfate, compounded. Finally, take OTC Prilosec which I'm trying to get off of. Am down to 1/4 tablet/ day. All for now.

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NAMES OF SUGARS AND IDENTIFYING SUGARS IN DRUGS AND SUPPLEMENTS.
This is the last installment of the information I wanted to share with you. Boston University has a web site which lists 20 – 30 names for sugar. Google "Boston University Sugars Table" and click on "Table Sugar." This list is intended for those with hereditary fructose intolerance, which is a totally different malady from fm, so ignore whether the table says you can eat the sugar or not. Just use it to identify names of sugars. Incidentally, glycerin is the same as glycerol, a sugar alcohol. Next, you can go to another invaluable federal database called Daily Med. Daily Med lists all of the prescription drugs and gives the package label insert for each. For example, indications and usage, contraindications, precautions, adverse reactions, dosage and administration, ingredients and appearance, etc. Go to "ingredients and appearance" at the bottom of the page and look up the drug ingredients, which includes the so-called "inactive" ingredients. These are often types of sugars, and armed with the Boston University sugars table info, you can decide whether the drug is low sugar or not. Some examples of sugars included in drugs, even those for digestive issues, are sucrose, lactose, corn starch, mannitol, etc. For example, Prilosec has sugar in it (I believe sucrose); why would they put sugar in a pill designed for digestive issues??? Daily Med is a U.S. National Library of Medicine database; the URL is dailymed.nlm.nih.gov. I kept tract of which drugs were ok for me and their inactive ingredients, and made an alphabetical list. For drugs that weren't ok, I made another list of their inactive ingredients that weren't on the ok list. Over time I came to learn the ok inactive ingredients, and could identify ok supplements as well using this information. I imagine the Boston U. Sugars Table would be useful in identifying sugars elsewhere such as in condiments. Hope this helps.