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donnelson (@donnelson)

Prostate cancer treated with Leuprolide

Prostate Cancer | Last Active: Aug 27, 2019 | Replies (75)

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@colleenyoung

Hi all,
We’ve archived the video chat with Mayo Clinic’s Dr. Castle. You can watch it here on Connect http://mayocl.in/2dD9wIG If you skip ahead to the time 5:15 on the video, you’ll hear where I brought your question about PSA monitoring to Dr. Castle.

Q: Can you speak to the importance and/or validity of PSA monitoring when someone has been diagnosed with prostate cancer as opposed to its use for screening?

A: Dr. Castle breaks down the different way PSA is used for monitoring disease spread. Start listening at 5:15 http://mayocl.in/2dD9wIG He concludes with “PSA is, without a doubt, our most important tool that we use currently in patients who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.”

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Replies to "Hi all, We've archived the video chat with Mayo Clinic's Dr. Castle. You can watch it..."

Thanks, I’ll look at it later. While he evidently emphasizes the value of skillful PSA interpretation, I wonder if he mentions the growing importance of relatively new imaging techniques in monitoring disease progression? If he doesn’t I’ll repost a video about it from Dr Kwon at Mayo Rochester.

I remain interested in the idea that a PSA test has become “our most important tool that we use currently in patients who have been diagnosed with prostate cancer.” Did Dr. Castle explain why this use of PSA is reliable when PSA to screen for PS is said to be relatively unreliable?

Please go back to the ancient posts about the difference of showing PSA pre and post treatment. I hope that you’re still not on the partial prostatectomy bandwagon.

I hope you’ll watch the video of Dr. Castle. It is only 15 minutes long. http://mayocl.in/2dD9wIG
He talks about new ways to detect prostate cancer and disease progression (2:00). And he explains how PSA, along with other tests, is used post treatment to monitor disease, according to which treatment a patient had. He does speak to the conflict of the 2 uses of PSA. Have a listen.

Ok, I watched it and it was pretty thorough and balanced. I did note the cheerleading for proton beam at or near the beginning. In 2007 when I was treated there were only 2 sites that offered it, Loma Linda U and U of Florida Shands. When I bounced it off the doctors I spoke to at a couple of clinics they dismissed proton beam as “no data”. Now the major clinics have caught up and build their own big shiny cyclotrons and its suddenly all that and a bag o’ chips. Not questioning his, or Mayo’s credibility, just reminding that there is a flavor of the day when it comes to cancer treatment.

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