AI Learning to "Sniff" Out Long QT

Feb 24 12:00pm | Katrina Sorensen, Research Coordinator | @katrinasorensen | Comments (4)

Example ECGs_Page_2_1

Above: An asymptomatic male patient with definite LQTS with a normal ECG and QTc who was flagged by the AI. 
 

This story originally appeared on tctmd.com and was written by Yael L. Maxwell.

Have you ever felt your heart racing? For most people, this is a normal reaction to things like exercise, fear, stress, anger, and even love. Your heart's electrical system is sped up due to your "fight or flight" instincts. When you cease your activity or calm your emotions, your heart resumes its natural rhythm.

For some, though, that's not always the case. These triggers can cause dangerously fast and irregular heartbeats, called arrhythmias, which can lead to fainting, seizures, and even sudden cardiac death. Sometimes, this stems from a genetic heart rhythm disorder known as long QT syndrome (LQTS). Due to its relative rarity, long QT syndrome often goes undetected until symptoms present themselves.

However, a new artificial intelligence (AI) solution may be able to change that. According to a new study recently published, the AI solution may be able to better and more easily identify long QT syndrome (LQTS) based on a 12-lead electrocardiogram (ECG) than what expert clinicians are able to see on their own.

Read more about the study and this new technology on the TCTMD website.

 

Related Articles:

Bos JM, Attia ZI, Albert DE, Noseworthy PA, Friedman PA, Ackerman MJ. Use of Artificial Intelligence and Deep Neural Networks in Evaluation of Patients With Electrocardiographically Concealed Long QT Syndrome From the Surface 12-Lead Electrocardiogram. JAMA Cardiol. Published online February 10, 2021. doi:10.1001/jamacardio.2020.7422

Giudicessi JR, Schram M, Bos JM, et al. Artificial Intelligence-Enabled Assessment of the Heart Rate Corrected QT Interval Using a Mobile Electrocardiogram DeviceAHA Circulation. Published online February 1, 2021. doi:10.1161/circulationaha.120.050231

 

Meet other people talking about genetic heart disorders on Mayo Clinic Connect. Join the Heart Rhythm Conditions group to join the conversation, share experiences, ask questions, and discover your support network.

For up-to-date information, please follow Dr. Ackerman and the Windland Smith Rice Genetic Heart Rhythm Clinic on Twitter by clicking the links below.

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This may not apply for this discussion but I will raise the question as I have been dealing with this. Would eating two to three carrots a day reduce or eliminate the heart arrhythmia? This is a while ago as I noticed by eating two to three raw carrots drastically reduces the heart arrhythmia. I talked to my doctor and dietitian but no conclusive idea about this. So, I was wondering if I am day dreaming or something is in carrot that can reduce the arrhythmia.
By the way I am on high blood pressure medication and I noticed and measured certain medications and dosages and how they are taken can cause heart palpitation and irregularity so I notified my doctor at Mayo and changed the medication and dosages.

REPLY
@enpool54

This may not apply for this discussion but I will raise the question as I have been dealing with this. Would eating two to three carrots a day reduce or eliminate the heart arrhythmia? This is a while ago as I noticed by eating two to three raw carrots drastically reduces the heart arrhythmia. I talked to my doctor and dietitian but no conclusive idea about this. So, I was wondering if I am day dreaming or something is in carrot that can reduce the arrhythmia.
By the way I am on high blood pressure medication and I noticed and measured certain medications and dosages and how they are taken can cause heart palpitation and irregularity so I notified my doctor at Mayo and changed the medication and dosages.

Jump to this post

Hi @enpool54, that would be an amazingly positive side effect of eating carrots. I have not heard of carrots related to cardiovascular health but did a Google search and found this paper that might interest you.
– Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321000/

Perhaps worthy of another discussion with your cardiologist?

I also encourage you to join other members in the discussions in this group"
– Heart Rhythm Conditions https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/heart-rhythm-conditions/

I bet you have much to offer.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

Hi @enpool54, that would be an amazingly positive side effect of eating carrots. I have not heard of carrots related to cardiovascular health but did a Google search and found this paper that might interest you.
– Carotenoids: potential allies of cardiovascular health? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4321000/

Perhaps worthy of another discussion with your cardiologist?

I also encourage you to join other members in the discussions in this group"
– Heart Rhythm Conditions https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/heart-rhythm-conditions/

I bet you have much to offer.

Jump to this post

Hi Collen,
Thanks for the note and the reference. Amazing how simple carrot that we may be eating as a routine food can have such impact on health and more amazing how much study is done and being done. I like to stay tuned with the heart study and I have sit on couple of live Facebook live presentations on Friday afternoons but I am not sure how to get notification on this. If you could send some guidelines I would appreciate it greatly.

Thanks again,
Nasser Pooaldian

REPLY
@enpool54

Hi Collen,
Thanks for the note and the reference. Amazing how simple carrot that we may be eating as a routine food can have such impact on health and more amazing how much study is done and being done. I like to stay tuned with the heart study and I have sit on couple of live Facebook live presentations on Friday afternoons but I am not sure how to get notification on this. If you could send some guidelines I would appreciate it greatly.

Thanks again,
Nasser Pooaldian

Jump to this post

I'm not that familiar with Facebook. However I believe when a Facebook live is announced you can choose to receive a notification when it goes live.

Are you referring specifically to Facebook lives done by Mayo Clinic?

REPLY
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