Video Q&A about Screening and Treatment Options for Gynecologic Cancers

Video Q&A about Screening and Treatment Options for Gynecologic Cancers

Mon, Sep 24, 2018
12:00pm to 12:30pm CT

Description

Drs. Tri Dinh and Matthew Robertson, gynecologic oncologists, answer your questions.

Learn more about screening and treatment options for cervical, endometrial, ovarian, and other gynecologic cancers.

Location

Online

I am very interested in the latest research on ovarian clear cell carcinoma and its association with endometriosis.

Hi @susu2 @colfordconnors @kenwood1 @stoligirl @vsinn2000 @diane060 @mdotsie @patricia5 @stayinghopeful @laurieann789 @pat417 @joannedb @katethegreat @caf132 @seansfather and @pauldale4

I'd like to invite you to join a live video Q&A with Mayo Clinic physicians Tri Dinh and Matthew Robertson, gynecologic oncologists, Monday, Sept 24 at noon CDT (1pm EDT, 10am PDT). You can post your questions before and during the broadcast. The video will also be archived on this page if you can make the live event.

To tune in on Monday, simply click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification. The video will appear at the top of the page at the appointed hour.

@colleenyoung

Hi @susu2 @colfordconnors @kenwood1 @stoligirl @vsinn2000 @diane060 @mdotsie @patricia5 @stayinghopeful @laurieann789 @pat417 @joannedb @katethegreat @caf132 @seansfather and @pauldale4

I'd like to invite you to join a live video Q&A with Mayo Clinic physicians Tri Dinh and Matthew Robertson, gynecologic oncologists, Monday, Sept 24 at noon CDT (1pm EDT, 10am PDT). You can post your questions before and during the broadcast. The video will also be archived on this page if you can make the live event.

To tune in on Monday, simply click VIEW & REPLY in the email notification. The video will appear at the top of the page at the appointed hour.

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Thank you. I have to work, but will watch it later.

I am pleased to be asked! My question pertains to how likely it is that ovarian cancer will come back after all those organs have been surgically removed. My cancer started in the left Fallopian tube and I have been offered Letrasol as a preventive to further recurrence but I know it has side effects,like menopause. One doctor says do it,another says it is not a good percentage bet. I had a long chemo treatment,and am tired and having cognitive issues,which are really bothering me as I was an active intellectual. I am 77.

My half-sister (via mother) was only 22 when she was diagnosed with cervical cancer, and had her organs removed, spiraling her to early menopause.
My question is: I wondered if there's a genetic predisposition? Does her cancer increase the likelihood that my daughters and I could get cervical cancer? What do those numbers look like?

What about her two daughters?
————
Also, is there any connection of cervical cancer to breast cancer? My daughters' grandmother (their father's side) has had ductal breast cancer twice and their great-grandmother (her mother) died of breast cancer in her 60's.
Thank you!

This broadcast has been postponed due to an unforeseen schedule change. I am so sorry for the inconvenience. @odette, @susu2, and @stowe: I will take your questions to the experts and post them here. @colleenyoung

Thank you for letting me know.

@susu2

I am pleased to be asked! My question pertains to how likely it is that ovarian cancer will come back after all those organs have been surgically removed. My cancer started in the left Fallopian tube and I have been offered Letrasol as a preventive to further recurrence but I know it has side effects,like menopause. One doctor says do it,another says it is not a good percentage bet. I had a long chemo treatment,and am tired and having cognitive issues,which are really bothering me as I was an active intellectual. I am 77.

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Here is Dr. Dinh's reply: The likelihood of a recurrence of ovarian cancer depends on multiple factors, some of the most important factors are: stage of disease at the time of initial diagnosis, your response to chemotherapy, and the cell type of the cancer itself. In regards to your concern for letrozole, you’re right in the fact that does have some side effects. However, at age 77, you have already gone through menopause and have experienced the side effects several decades previously. Thus, from the aspect of menopausal symptoms, my guess is that you will have minimal side effects. Overall, we do think that the side effects from letrozole is relatively minimal, and if your cancer is hormonally sensitive, it is a good bet is to use letrozole to help prevent or slow down a recurrence.

@stowe

My half-sister (via mother) was only 22 when she was diagnosed with cervical cancer, and had her organs removed, spiraling her to early menopause.
My question is: I wondered if there's a genetic predisposition? Does her cancer increase the likelihood that my daughters and I could get cervical cancer? What do those numbers look like?

What about her two daughters?
————
Also, is there any connection of cervical cancer to breast cancer? My daughters' grandmother (their father's side) has had ductal breast cancer twice and their great-grandmother (her mother) died of breast cancer in her 60's.
Thank you!

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Here is Dr. Dinh's reply: No, cervical cancer is not thought to be genetically determined. Thus, there is no risk at all for you to develop cervical cancer, simply because your half-sister had been diagnosed. The cause of the vast majority of cervical cancer is infection with the HPV virus. This virus is very common in the human population. Approximately 80% of men and women have been infected with this virus at some point in their lives. However, we still do not know why some people develop cervical cancer and the vast majority do not. The best way to prevent cervical cancer is to do cervical cancer screening. In the United States, that is done with Pap smears and HPV testing. These tests are exceedingly good, and they have led to a significant decrease in cervical cancer rates over the last several decades. In regards to daughters, if they are between the ages of 9 and 26, a very good way to prevent cervical cancer is the HPV vaccine. This vaccine actually is recommended for boys between those ages as well. There are no proven significant side effects to the vaccine, i.e, they are incredibly safe, and can prevent a potentially terrible medical condition from occurring in the first place.

@audreylaine

This broadcast has been postponed due to an unforeseen schedule change. I am so sorry for the inconvenience. @odette, @susu2, and @stowe: I will take your questions to the experts and post them here. @colleenyoung

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I've noticed that some of the other questions posed have been responded to by the speakers. Will my question be answered at some point? Thank you very much.

@odette

I've noticed that some of the other questions posed have been responded to by the speakers. Will my question be answered at some point? Thank you very much.

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@odette, I'm tagging @audreylaine to look into posting a response to your question. Thanks for the poke.

@colleenyoung

@odette, I'm tagging @audreylaine to look into posting a response to your question. Thanks for the poke.

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Thank you very much.

@odette

Thank you very much.

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I sent your question also, but I’m still waiting on a response. Typically, a researcher will answer questions like yours, while clinicians answer the clinical questions.

Thank you so much, Audrey. As OCCC is so rare, I am always looking at the latest research on this disease. I so appreciate having information provided by the Mayo Clinic and the expertise it can offer.

@odette

Thank you so much, Audrey. As OCCC is so rare, I am always looking at the latest research on this disease. I so appreciate having information provided by the Mayo Clinic and the expertise it can offer.

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Here’s what Dr. Dinh said: That’s a broad question, yes, there is some thoughts about endometriosis being associated with some “ovarian” type cancer including clear cell. There is no research in regards to treatment as we treat “ovarian” cancer similarly whether we think it comes originally from the endometriosis or the Fallopian tube/ovary/or peritoneum not associated with endometriosis.

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