Opioid Epidemic Chat with Dr. Hooten

Thu, Sep 22, 2016
1:00pm to 2:00pm ET

Description

On September 22, Dr. W. Michael Hooten, an anesthesiologist and pain management expert at Mayo Clinic, hosted a live discussions about opioids. Public health experts call the Opioid Epidemic a serious public health issue. Learn more about:

  • What are opioids and what do they do
  • What are the concerns for use and misuse
  • How do people become addicted
  • What help is available to manage chronic pain

Additional opioid information from Mayo Clinic

Mayo Clinic Minute: Prescription drugs - the changing face of addiction

Mayo Clinic Minute: Facts on fentanyl

Mayo Clinic Minute: Avoid opioids for chronic pain

Mayo Clinic Minute: 2 reasons not to share pain pills

Mayo Clinic Minute: When are opioids OK to take?

Mayo Clinic Minute: What opioids do to your gut

Mayo Clinic Minute: How to stop popping painkillers

 

 

Location

Online

You got that right, @dawn_giacabazi! Standardizing resort to pharmacogenomic testing (PGT) should be a high priority of all medical professional agencies and organizations. It’s the current favorite device for greatly improving the efficiency and effectiveness of therapies that involve medications. I’m reminded again of the SAMHSA report’s declaration that proper use of a medication is “directed by a doctor.” In that way, PGT becomes a doctor’s indispensable tool for formulating their best directions convincingly!

Are there any long term effects of taking oxycodone (oxynorm)for chronic pain? I take approximately 75ml per day.
I’m aware of the addictive nature of this drug but am intolerant to everything else for neuropathic pain which in my case is quite severe.

What is the feeling that users get from heroin? Why do people start drugs if they don’t have a condition

after 12 years on opiod prescription pain use, I am quite sure my body is addicted, so what do you see for my future pain relief

I’m not surprised the Connect members have great questions 🙂
Keep your questions coming. Dr. Hooten is taking them live. Thanks Vivien.

in todays Obamacare society, Medicaid patients are not readily able to do the alternative rehabilitation strategies that dr hooten is suggesting.

Many Connect members ask:
“If I want to get off opioids, what is the best way to do it? Where can I go for help?”

What about genetic testing to find out what kind of pain meds will work. After surgery, my daughter was given Tramadol, only to find out she has liver enzyme complications…the Tramadol backed up, didn’t process and created horrible side effects.

Why would a physician order opioids rather than trying non opioid meds first?

Today’s chat with Dr. Hooten will be archived here, so you can share it with others or watch it again. This was the first in a series of 7 chats about opioids. Please join us again for these chats:

* Sept. 22 – Prescription drugs – the changing face of addiction
* Sept. 23 – Facts on fentanyl
* Sept. 26 – Avoid opioids for chronic pain
* Sept. 27 – 2 reasons not to share pain pills
* Sept. 28 – When are opioids OK to take?
* Sept. 29 – What opioids do to your gut
* Sept. 30 – How to stop popping painkillers

http://mayocl.in/2ddeyIn

If your questions weren’t answered today, we’ll include them in the following chat.

Connect with other members talking about pain management right here on Connect https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/pain/

@danasparks

What about genetic testing to find out what kind of pain meds will work. After surgery, my daughter was given Tramadol, only to find out she has liver enzyme complications…the Tramadol backed up, didn’t process and created horrible side effects.

Jump to this post

Dana, good question. I believe Dr. Hooten talked about genetic testing earlier in the segment. The video archive will be available shortly.

Please – Marijuana study of 1000 opiate users. They can smoke. End conversation?
How many lives have been saved in Colorado?

I take 1/2 a tablet of Vicodin no more than once a day. Sometimes I need to take a whole tablet, but that may be once or twice in a year, and some days I can go weeks without taking any. I have chronic, acute back , sciatic pain. I have tried everything my doctor recommended. I have stayed at this 1/2 tablet for years, and it dulls it t that level, but doesn’t take the pain away. That is ok! I am good with it dull, as I want to take the lowest does possible. I do not have an addictive personality, and am very aware of not taking more. Am I ok at this level?

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