Video Q&A about Genetic risk factors for breast, gynecological cancer

Mon, May 8, 2017
1:00pm to 2:00pm ET

Description

Dr. Barbara Pockaj, surgeon, and Katherine Hunt Brendish, Ph.D., genetic counselor, at Mayo Clinic in Arizona discuss genetic risk factors for breast cancer and gynecological cancers.

Learn more about:

  1. Genetic risk factors for breast and gynecological cancers
  2. BRCA gene test for breast and ovarian cancer risk
  3. Outcomes of concurrent breast and gynecologic risk reduction

Drs. Pockaj and Hunt Brendish answered questions during the live broadcast.

Location

Online

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@conny51

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Welcome @conny51,
You can signup for the Video Q&A about Genetic risk factors for breast, gynecological cancer here http://mayocl.in/2qyeJnq
Do you have a question that you`d like to ask Drs. Pockaj and Hunt Brendish?

Are you familiar with the Kras-variant research on genetic predisposition for breast and ovarian cancer? I took part in this research and I am positive for the Kras-variant. I had a hysterectomy at age 31 due to endometriosis but my daughter did have ovarian cancer at age 48 and my niece died of breast cancer at age 56. I also had several aunts to die of ovarian or breast cancer. How does the Kras-variant test relate to the BRCA test and should I have the BRCA test done in addition to the Kras? Thanks.

@conny51

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My question is about risks of recurrence and risk reduction. I had DCIS and Lobular Atypical Hyperplasia in one breast. I’m taking Tamoxifen 20 mg/day. The Gail risk score was 3.5 times the average.
My maternal aunt (deceased) had breast cancer, her daughter (also deceased) had ovarian cancer. My paternal first counsin had Stage 1 breast cancer. She had a lumpectomy and radiation 8 years ago. No recurrance

I had a vaginal hysterectomy at age 49, and as I was about to be discharged, my surgeon came in and told me that they had found a malignant tumor in the wall of my uterus. It was classified as endometrial cancer. I had external and internal radiation, no chemo. My two daughters are approaching the same age, and both have had the same type of menstrual problems as I had. They both had ablations about 10 years ago, which I never had with my serious period problems. I am concerned that they could develop cancer without the same symptoms I had (extremely painful, clotted bleeding) since they haven’t menstruated since the procedures.

@conny51 @Gray @rosysharon I hope you were able to tune into the broadcast. Dr Pockaj and Dr. Hunt Brendish answered your questions. The video has been archived and saved at the top of this page. Feel free to watch it any time.

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@colleenyoung

@conny51 @Gray @rosysharon I hope you were able to tune into the broadcast. Dr Pockaj and Dr. Hunt Brendish answered your questions. The video has been archived and saved at the top of this page. Feel free to watch it any time.

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@colleenyoung, Thank you for submitting my question.  I received just the answer I needed.  The information provided was easy to understand and was very helpful.  I now have a better understanding of genetic factors, risks and recommendations.

@colleenyoung

@conny51 @Gray @rosysharon I hope you were able to tune into the broadcast. Dr Pockaj and Dr. Hunt Brendish answered your questions. The video has been archived and saved at the top of this page. Feel free to watch it any time.

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Unfortunately I couldn’t hear the broadcast. I guess I’ll have to buy a good speaker to attach to my laptop. Videos come in loud and clear, but since this was live, it may not have come through as loudly. I’ll listen again after I get the speaker. Thanks for including me.

@colleenyoung

@conny51 @Gray @rosysharon I hope you were able to tune into the broadcast. Dr Pockaj and Dr. Hunt Brendish answered your questions. The video has been archived and saved at the top of this page. Feel free to watch it any time.

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Hi RosySharon,
Did you try using headphones with your laptop? Even if the speaker doesn’t work loudly enough, the headphones should work. The sound was very clear for me.

In the meantime, here is a paraphrase version of Dr. Brendish’s answer:
“This is a great question. Moms also worry about their daughters, especially if they’ve been diagnosed with a gynecological cancer. The person who has had the endometrial cancer should come in with a very detailed history for a genetic counsellor to review. Having endometrial cancer itself does not mean that it is related to something genetic or that that increases their daughters’ risk. It’s more important to know how many other first degree relatives have had cancer. A first degree relative is a parent or a sibling. Second degree is a cousin, aunt or uncle. It is less likely to be genetic if it is just one person in the family who has had cancer, even if it was at a younger age.”

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