Video Q&A about Heart Valve Disease and Surgical Options

Tue, Dec 4, 2018
12:00pm to 12:30pm CT

Description

Dr. Joseph Dearani, Chair, Cardiovascular Surgery, and  Dr. Juan Crestanello, cardiovascular surgeon, talk about heart valve disease and surgical options.

Learn more about:

  • How heart valve disease is treated.
  • When to consider surgery.
  • The latest technology used for repair.

Location

Online

Why does tricuspid valve repair or replacement cause such a high risk of death during surgery?

REPLY

Thank you for watching today’s Q&A. The video will be archived on this page for future viewing.
You may also be interested in joining other members who are talking about heart valve disease and the various treatment options in these discussions in the Heart & Blood Health group
https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/heart-blood-vessel-conditions/

– Will I have a heart attack or stroke? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/will-i-have-a-heart-attack-or-stroke/
– Aortic Stenosis & Valve Replacement https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/aortic-valve-calcification/
– Six Month Post Aortic Heart Valve: All is Great https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/six-month-post-aortic-heart-valve-all-is-great/

See upcoming and past Q&As here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/webinars

REPLY
@mezzosoprano

I am a young 96 year old female with severe aortic valve stenosis. I am asynptomatic. What do you suggest?

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Hello! Here is a response from our experts: It is hard to recommend specific treatments without fully evaluating the patient in person. In general, patients with asymptomatic aortic stenosis may be followed closely with serial examinations and echocardiograms. I would recommend that you consult with your physician regarding the best option for your care.

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@matthew33

When is surgery a better option compared to minimally invasive TAVR?

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Hi, @matthew33. Here is a response from our experts: TAVR is approved for patients who are inoperable, high risk or intermediate risk patients for surgical aortic valve replacement. However, there are still issues that have not been clarified after TAVR; for example, valve durability, freedom from reoperation, and need for permanent pacemaker. Surgical aortic valve replacement is still the standard of care for patients with aortic stenosis. It is safe, well tolerated, and durable. Young, low-risk patients and patients who require other procedures such as surgery in another valve or bypass surgery, or who are not candidates for TAVR can be treated with surgery. Aortic valve replacement surgery can be performed minimally invasive through a 5- 6 cm incision either in the middle of the chest or through the right side of the chest. In addition, there are younger patients who may prefer open-heart surgery so they can rule receive a mechanical valve, which will not deteriorate with time. The TAVR is a tissue valve with a limited lifespan.

REPLY
@matthew33

Which is the preferred diagnostic tool, a cardiac MRI or Echocardiogram?

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Hi, @matthew33. Here is a response from our experts: It depends on the information that we are looking for. In general, an echocardiogram provides more precise functional information about valve function while MRI helps to delineate better the ventricular anatomy and metabolic abnormalities of the heart muscle.

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@momoffive

Is it safe to take a wait and see approach if I had a mitral valve cyst that was found by echo in september that measured 11mm and was measured in November by MRI at 17mm?

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Hi, @momoffive. Here is a response from our experts: I would ask your doctor for advice on this topic. If the cyst is growing, it may be advisable to remove. But again, we cannot give individual patient advise without having seen the patient or his/her studies.

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@bjanderson

Why does tricuspid valve repair or replacement cause such a high risk of death during surgery?

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Hi, @bjanderson. Here is a response from our experts: In general patients with tricuspid valve disease have more advanced cardiac disease and as such their surgical risk is higher. In addition, patients are often referred too late for tricuspid surgery. When a referral is earlier before advanced heart failure is present, results are improved.

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@Margaret_Marie

Hi, @bjanderson. Here is a response from our experts: In general patients with tricuspid valve disease have more advanced cardiac disease and as such their surgical risk is higher. In addition, patients are often referred too late for tricuspid surgery. When a referral is earlier before advanced heart failure is present, results are improved.

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Thanks for responding.

REPLY
@Margaret_Marie

Hi, @bjanderson. Here is a response from our experts: In general patients with tricuspid valve disease have more advanced cardiac disease and as such their surgical risk is higher. In addition, patients are often referred too late for tricuspid surgery. When a referral is earlier before advanced heart failure is present, results are improved.

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What is the expected outcome for tricuspid surgery if the patient is not referred too late and has no advanced cardiac disease?

REPLY
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