Aging & Health: Take Charge

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PUBLIC PAGE
Oct 21 10:08am

Do you need a multivitamin?

By Joey Keillor, @joeykeillor

shutterstock_749348062

 

Although getting lots of vitamins may seem like a healthy idea, it turns out it’s possible to have too much of a good thing. Your body needs vitamins in relatively small amounts.  But if you choose to take supplemental vitamins, consider these tips:

  • Stay reasonably close to the Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) — unless told otherwise by your doctor. The RDA is the average daily level of intake that’s sufficient to meet the nutritional needs of most healthy people.
  • Avoid taking too much of any individual vitamin, especially the fat soluble vitamins A, D, E and K. With vitamins that are fat soluble, your body stores excess amounts, primarily in the liver.
  • Before you take any supplements talk to your doctor or a dietitian. There may be ways to modify your diet to get the vitamins you need without taking a supplement. But if a supplement is necessary for good health, choose supplements that don’t exceed your doctor or dietitian’s recommendations.

In general, the best way to get vitamins is through food. Foods offer a complexity of nutrients that can't be reproduced in a vitamin supplement. In addition, unlike vitamin supplements, no concerns have been raised about the safety of vitamins consumed in foods. There's overwhelming evidence that a diet rich in plant-based foods — fruits, vegetables, nuts, legumes, seeds and whole grains — is a rock-solid foundation for optimal health.

 

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I want to connect with others that have mild peripheral neuropathy. I am 73, was diagnosed 5 years ago, started in my left foot and now has spread to both lower legs. Just numbness, some tingling, but NO PAIN. Just wondering if there are any treatments that can arrest the spread, and could I have another condition, given the absence of pain.

COMMENT

I'm interested in this topic too. I am 81 and was diagnosed with mild peripheral neuropathy in my toes. I exercise regularly and have no pain. I can feel sensations in the bottom of my feet, but not my toes. Is the spread inevitable or is it sometimes limited to one area?

COMMENT
@jrayk

I want to connect with others that have mild peripheral neuropathy. I am 73, was diagnosed 5 years ago, started in my left foot and now has spread to both lower legs. Just numbness, some tingling, but NO PAIN. Just wondering if there are any treatments that can arrest the spread, and could I have another condition, given the absence of pain.

Jump to this post

@jrayk, welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Please follow the Neuropathy support group here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/neuropathy/

This group is dedicated to people who have peripheral neuropathy and are sharing solutions about supplements, treatments and living well. I think you'll be particularly interested in these 2 discussions:
– Neuropathy: Numbness only, no pain https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/neuropathy-numbness-only-no-pain/
– Member Neuropathy Journey Stories: What's Yours? https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/member-neuoropathy-journey-stories-whats-yours/

COMMENT
@zapetta

I'm interested in this topic too. I am 81 and was diagnosed with mild peripheral neuropathy in my toes. I exercise regularly and have no pain. I can feel sensations in the bottom of my feet, but not my toes. Is the spread inevitable or is it sometimes limited to one area?

Jump to this post

@zapetta, you and I were posting at the same time. I hope you saw the suggestions I made to @jrayk about the Neuropathy group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/neuropathy/ where can connect with others like you.

Check out the Group Directory to see if there are other groups you may be interested in: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/groups/

COMMENT
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