Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

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Tue, Jan 23, 2018 2:22pm

Stress Relief is Only a Few Breaths Away

By Michelle Graff-Radford, HABIT Yoga Instructor, @michellegraffradford

BreatheDid you ever feel upset or stressed and have someone tell you, “Take a deep breath and relax.” Did you try it?

Many relaxation practices use breathing techniques to promote a state of calm. Deep breathing can decrease the effect of stress on your mind and body. It also can slow your heartbeat and lower or stabilize blood pressure. We can't avoid all the sources of stress in our lives, nor would we want to. But, we can develop healthier ways of responding to them.

During moments of stress, your thoughts may be drawn toward past regrets and worries about the future. Thankfully, you possess a readily accessible and free tool that can be used to manage stress right under your nose— your breath. Breathing can be your anchor to stay in the present moment -–in the here and now. Although breathing is something your body does naturally, it's also a skill that can be enhanced.

There are two basic types of breathing:

  • Chest breathing which uses secondary muscles in your upper chest. Chest breathing is helpful in situations of great exertion, such as a sprint. During stressful situations, you may inadvertently resort to chest breathing. This can lead to tight shoulder and neck muscles and even headaches. Chronic stress can increase these symptoms. Chest breathing can make you feel short of breath and anxious.
  • Diaphragmatic breathing (Belly breathing) which comes from the body's dominant breathing muscle — the diaphragm. The diaphragm is a dome-like muscle between the chest and the abdomen. This type of breathing is effective and a great way to reduce stress and tension.

Diaphragmatic breathing Tips

  • This type of breathing can be practiced in any position, but it is easiest to learn while lying down. Lie on your back on a flat surface or in bed, with your knees bent and your head supported.
  • Loosen any tight clothing.
  • Relax your shoulder and neck muscles. If you wish, close your eyes.

Pursed lip breathing will help you develop diaphragmatic breathing.

Place one hand on your upper chest and your other hand below your rib cage. This will allow you to feel your diaphragm move as you breathe.

  • Breathe in through your nose (as if you are smelling a rose) for about 2 seconds.
  • Purse your lips like you’re getting ready to whistle or gently blow out candles on a birthday cake.
  • Breathe out very slowly through pursed lips, while slowly counting to four.
  • Repeat four times.
  • As you breathe in your belly should move outward against your hand. The hand on your chest should remain as still as possible.
  • As you breathe out slowly through pursed lips, gently tighten your belly muscles. This will push up on your diaphragm to help get your air out.
  • Notice how you feel after doing a few pursed lip breathing breaths?

Nose breathing

Now breathe in and out through the nose. Find a breathing rate that is comfortable for you.

  • For example, you could slowly breathe in for four counts and out for four counts.
  • Or, consider adding a short silent phrase to the breathing: “I am” on the inhalation and “relaxed” on the exhalation.

Caution: Some people get dizzy the first few times they try deep breathing. If you become lightheaded, slow your breathing or temporarily discontinue the breathing exercise and try again at another time.

How often should I practice this exercise?

Practice belly breathing about 5-10 minutes per day.

This type of daily practice makes it easier to use the breathing technique when stressful situations arise.

You can use this breathing any time, but especially when you are upset, anxious, have difficulty sleeping, or are experiencing pain. Try it now!

We would love to hear how these breathing techniques helped you.

 

It works. I have been following Dr. Weill’s Breathing instructions.

On the subject of stress, how do you respond to a friend or relative who dismisses your concerns, saying something like :”well, it could be worse” and then proceeds to provide numerous examples of “real stress.”

@jshdma

On the subject of stress, how do you respond to a friend or relative who dismisses your concerns, saying something like :”well, it could be worse” and then proceeds to provide numerous examples of “real stress.”

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They’re not dismissing the situation. Three things I’ve learned about cbt are decatastrphising. The situation isn’t as bad as it seems. Disputing expectations. Distraction.

@jshdma

On the subject of stress, how do you respond to a friend or relative who dismisses your concerns, saying something like :”well, it could be worse” and then proceeds to provide numerous examples of “real stress.”

Jump to this post

How do you (or anyone) know how bad any given situation may be? A basic law of psychology holds that “perception is reality.”

When in doubt ask someone who can help

@jshdma

On the subject of stress, how do you respond to a friend or relative who dismisses your concerns, saying something like :”well, it could be worse” and then proceeds to provide numerous examples of “real stress.”

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@jshdma,
Take a deep breathe and walk away from those that offer examples of real stress. .. a lot less stressful that way. Stress is stress… how to deal with it is the hard part. I like to walk and during my walks I do my breathing exercises. Walking clears my mind and helps me see thing more clearly. I also crochet and do puzzles. Do things you like to do.. great stress relievers!! I also talk with my husband who is my best friend. I have had talks with our dogs over the years… our pets, no matter if dog, cat or bird seem to like to listen. They are great stress relievers. Of course sometimes they cause a little too. Life would be boring if we did not have ups and downs. Sometimes strangers can be good listeners too. I’ve found that to be here at Mayo Connect.
Zaroga

@inez

It works. I have been following Dr. Weill’s Breathing instructions.

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A Few.  Ba7hy gowiring Hopefully we loomingzqhed sorry,about,spice.chen

@inez

It works. I have been following Dr. Weill’s Breathing instructions.

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Hello, @janeking, and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. Looks like maybe you have a bit of a gremlin that got into your computer and punched a few keys for you. 🙂 No worries. Would you mind posting your message again?

Sounds like perhaps you have used a few of these breathing techniques? Will you tell us about them and how they’ve worked?

I use deep breathing just before I go to sleep at night. Often times it is with guided meditation. Works every time.

@dsisko

I use deep breathing just before I go to sleep at night. Often times it is with guided meditation. Works every time.

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I find deep breathing raises my heart-rate. I must be doing it wrong.

@dsisko

I use deep breathing just before I go to sleep at night. Often times it is with guided meditation. Works every time.

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@jshdma

Is it possible that you have a heart or lung related health problem? If not, you may be breathing too quickly – quick, repetitive breathing can cause a raise in heart rate and even dizziness. Here is an article from Mayo’s website with different types of breathing exercises, https://www.mayoclinic.org/healthy-lifestyle/stress-management/in-depth/decrease-stress-by-using-your-breath/art-20267197?pg=1.

If you try any of these exercises, I’d like to hear how they work for you.

Teresa

@dsisko

I use deep breathing just before I go to sleep at night. Often times it is with guided meditation. Works every time.

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Thanks, will try the recommended exercises. But I have no heart or lung problems and I am sure I am breathing quite slowly–counting slowly up to many numbers. I am, however, a nervous person.

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