Cancer Education Center

Welcome to the Slaggie Family Cancer Education Center page. Our goal is to empower patients and their supporters to become active partners in their health care by providing relevant information, increasing knowledge and learning from one another’s experiences. Follow the Cancer Education Center page and stay up-to-date as we post accurate and timely cancer-related information on topics such as cancer prevention, risks, treatments, clinical trials, end-of-life care, and survivorship. No matter where you are in your journey, we are here to help.

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Thu, Jan 24 2:50pm

Energizing Movement

By Megan Roessler M. Ed., @meganroessler

shutterstock_595969619Exercise during cancer treatment?  Can I? Should I?  Maybe this is a question you have asked yourself.  Patients have a variety of thoughts about exercising during treatment, which can be influenced by your activity level prior to diagnosis.  Some people are accustomed to having a regular, even vigorous workout habit prior to diagnosis.  Some individuals have little to no activity.  You may feel like exercise is a part of your life you want to continue at your current level.  You may feel inspired to add a health benefit to your lifestyle.  Or be anywhere on the continuum of activity.

First, let's talk about why you should consider some kind of movement during treatment.  Research supports that exercise is most often safe during active treatment, as well as beneficial for a variety of reasons.

  • Mental - Being active gives you a sense of self-control, improves body image, combats anxiety and depression and gives you a sense of accomplishment.  It also releases those feel good hormones - endorphins!
  • Physical - Exercise helps with fatigue, weight control, nausea, protects deconditioning of your heart and lungs, and helps to maintain muscle tissue.  Exercise and a healthy weight are important in reducing the risk for many cancer types.

If you are a person who has an active lifestyle already, just be sure to go slow and to be gentle with yourself and expectations.  If you are a person who is wanting to increase activity, start slow.  Whichever camp you come from, give yourself credit for what you are doing!  Don't belittle your efforts.  Cheer and encourage yourself just as you would a friend.  The movement you choose to do should feel energizing.  Not too much that you are completely depleted, and not so little that you can hardly tell you've done anything.  As always, it is good to check with your doctor to see what is recommended and safe for you.

You may be interested in new fitness guidelines released by the Department of Health and Human Services.  The encouraging takeaway from the new guidelines is that it all adds up.  All your activity, even short increments, are beneficial and count!  The recommendations are for an average healthy, person and may need to be adjusted for a person receiving treatment. As always, it is good to check with your doctor to see what is recommended and safe for you.

We'd love to hear what you find to be energizing movement - even the small doses!

I want to connect with other non Hodgkin patients concerning exercise….want to share my background/experience

@georger

I want to connect with other non Hodgkin patients concerning exercise….want to share my background/experience

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Welcome to Connect, @georger. You can connect with others living with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in the Blood Cancers group (https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/blood-cancers-disorders/)

I see you started a new discussion called
> Exercise during chemo https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/exercise-during-chemo/

That is a great topic for all cancer types. I have shared your discussion across all the cancer groups. Thank you!

Here are other NHL-related discussions you may wish to join too:
> Non Hodgkin's Lymphoma- Watch & Wait Approach https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/non-hodgkins-lymphoma-watch-wait-approach/
> Non Hodgkin's lymphoma https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/non-hodgkins-lymphoma-2c0eb7/

What exercise helped you the most, George?

Hi Colleen….I was very fortunate tohave had a career as an exercise physiologist so I was able to keep going rather than start it up but my best exercise was the rowing machine as it is easily done at various levels of intensity….some bicycling as well

When I can get my butt to the gym I do also like the rowing and reclining elliptical bike. The trick is getting myself there… All the talk about activity on this site is encouraging me.

I exercised throughout my cancer treatment. I believe keeping your routines, one of them being exercse for me, is important especially when such a stressful time on our mind and body. There were days when I didn't want to do it but I believed it helped expedite my recovery, and each day, when done, I was glad I made it to the gym.

@ginpene05

When I can get my butt to the gym I do also like the rowing and reclining elliptical bike. The trick is getting myself there… All the talk about activity on this site is encouraging me.

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Get on it….I'm there with you

@ginpene05

When I can get my butt to the gym I do also like the rowing and reclining elliptical bike. The trick is getting myself there… All the talk about activity on this site is encouraging me.

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We can take all the encouragement we can get! Having someone to keep accountable to helps me to stay motivated!

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