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Sep 29, 2016 · Prostate cancer and radiation in Cancer

There seems to be very little out there regarding this particular Cyberknife, but in general they are used for small tumors in tight spots. Proton beam is used similarly and is in common usage now. What makes this method more effective than other precision radiation therapies and where is the data to back it up?

Sep 29, 2016 · Prostate cancer treated with Leuprolide in Cancer

Ok, I watched it and it was pretty thorough and balanced. I did note the cheerleading for proton beam at or near the beginning. In 2007 when I was treated there were only 2 sites that offered it, Loma Linda U and U of Florida Shands. When I bounced it off the doctors I spoke to at a couple of clinics they dismissed proton beam as “no data”. Now the major clinics have caught up and build their own big shiny cyclotrons and its suddenly all that and a bag o’ chips. Not questioning his, or Mayo’s credibility, just reminding that there is a flavor of the day when it comes to cancer treatment.

Sep 29, 2016 · Prostate cancer treated with Leuprolide in Cancer

Please go back to the ancient posts about the difference of showing PSA pre and post treatment. I hope that you’re still not on the partial prostatectomy bandwagon.

Sep 28, 2016 · Can you use the Dr Terry Wahls Diet for Chronic Pain? in Neuropathy

Looks like a variation on gluten free.

Here’s a study on a very small uncontrolled pilot study using it for MS in the J Altern Complement Med. 2014 May 1; 20(5): 347–355.

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4011484/

“Conclusions: In this small, uncontrolled pilot study, there was a significant improvement in fatigue in those who completed the study. Given the small sample size and completer rate, further evaluation of this multimodal therapy is warranted.”

I don’t know, I hesitant to advocate for the Wahls diet where the one who studied it is Wahls.

“Disclosure Statement

Dr. Terry Wahls has equity interest in the following companies: Dr. Terry Wahls LLC; TZ Press LLC; Xcellerator LLC; RDT LLC; and the website http://www.terrywahls.com. She also owns the copyright to the book Minding My Mitochondria, 2nd Edition and has an application pending for trademark for the Wahls Protocol™, and a patent pending for a therapeutic electrode garment. Dr. Wahls has conflict of interest management plans in place with both the University of Iowa and the Veterans Affairs Iowa City Healthcare System.”

Stop eating milk, eggs, and foods with gluten and you’re pretty much there.

Sep 28, 2016 · Prostate cancer treated with Leuprolide in Cancer

Thanks, I’ll look at it later. While he evidently emphasizes the value of skillful PSA interpretation, I wonder if he mentions the growing importance of relatively new imaging techniques in monitoring disease progression? If he doesn’t I’ll repost a video about it from Dr Kwon at Mayo Rochester.

Sep 24, 2016 · Sjogrens in Autoimmune Diseases

Sorry to hear that. I have it too and its much nastier than many people believe.
Do you have a question or questions about some aspect of Sjogren’s such as medications, complications, co-morbitities?

Sep 23, 2016 · Left Ventricular Diastolic Dysfunction - pre heart failure, preserved in Heart & Blood Health

Good, I hope it helps. I’m going to dump mine back up to ~2.5 gms/day and hope for the best. Remember they can suppress immunity but I’d guess that it takes a higher dose to do that. Potential cognitive bennies, mostly from DHA, are a perk I’m in need of. Grape and grape seed are also loaded with polyphenols that appear to have consistent benefit, or at least little chance of downside. You can buy resveratrol at pretty high concentrations at Costco. Going too high is always a bad idea anyway. That’s a good point re longevity. It takes a while to down regulate SIRT1 or whatever the master switch is. I thought about it and I’m going to avoid it. I’m past longevity and into survival and high doses of antioxidants don’t look like they enhance the probabilities. Let me know how your investigations progress.
Jim

Sep 23, 2016 · Ferrlecit Infusions for Ferritin Iron Deficiency in Blood Cancers & Disorders

Glad to share what I have but I can’t give you any insight into your overall situation since there are gaps. Ferritin, along with some other tests, is a standard measure of iron deficiency as reflected in the status of your iron stores. Low ferritin is not a separate type of deficiency but rather a reflection of the degree of that deficiency. Conversely it can be a useful metric when looking for iron overload or anemia of chronic disease, the most common mimic of iron deficiency.

http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/ferritin-test/basics/definition/prc-20014449

So did your doctor call this out as a “ferritin iron deficiency” in contrast to an iron deficiency and that’s why you needed infusions rather than standard oral iron therapy?
Since ferritin is a measure of iron storage I looked at Iron storage diseases to see if there was one where the body would not store it and couldn’t find one. The covers is usually true, it stores too much.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2030637/

So, the only situation that I can link to some need to go right to iron infusions is in hemodialysis as I mentioned earlier and apparently that’s not you.
Apologies in advance if I already asked but did you try adequate levels of oral iron therapy, possibly multiple forms?
At the end of the day its what works, so it this has rescued you from chronic symptoms its something worth taking seriously.
This meta analysis seems to agree, but for patients with absorption issues.

http://www.jwatch.org/na32026/2013/10/31/intravenous-vs-oral-iron-patients-with-anemia

“In 22 trials (3300 participants), IV iron significantly lowered the need for red-cell transfusion compared with oral iron or no iron (relative risk, ≈0.8). Effects were larger in patients with low baseline ferritin concentrations and were enhanced by concurrent use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents. In 24 trials (4400 participants), IV iron did not lead to excess mortality but did increase incidence of all-cause infection compared with oral iron (RR, 1.6) or no iron (RR, 1.3).”

Hope this helps