About

Member has chosen to not make this information public.

Posts (142)

3 days ago · Neuroendocrine Cancer Support Group in Neuroendocrine Tumors (NETs)

In this monthly support group, topics may include symptom and disease management as well as the emotional, physical, and financial impact of the disease.  We will invite various multi-disciplinary professionals to provide information on a wide range of topics.

Join in person or via phone. Call 866-365-4406, access code 9537292#.

International +13032489655.

6 days ago · Video Q&A about Prostate Cancer in Cancer

Join us Thursday, Sept. 26 at 10:30 a.m. CT for a video Q&A with urologists Dr. Paul Andrews and Dr. Scott Cheney, about prostate cancer.

Drs. Andrews and Cheney will answer questions during the broadcast. Please post your questions below.

Return to this webpage to take part in the video Q&A live on Sept. 26 at 10:30 a.m. CT. It will also be archived on this page.

6 days ago · Video Q&A about Cardiomyopathy in Heart & Blood Health

Join us Wednesday, Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. CT for a video Q&A with cardiothoracic surgeons, Dr. Kevin Landolfo and Dr. Basar Sareyyupoglu, about cardiomyopathy.

Drs. Landolfo and Sareyyupoglu will answer questions during the broadcast. Please post your questions below.

Return to this webpage to take part in the video Q&A live on Sept. 25 at 2 p.m. CT. It will also be archived on this page.

Wed, Sep 11 11:58am · Video Q&A about Moyamoya in Brain & Nervous System

Join us Thursday, Sept. 19 at 3:30 p.m. CT for a video Q&A with Dr. James Meschia, neurologist, and Dr. Rabih Tawk, neurosurgeon, about Moyamoya disease.

Drs. Meschia and Tawk will answer questions during the broadcast. Please post your questions below.

Return to this webpage to take part in the video Q&A live on Sept. 19 at 3:30 p.m. CT. It will also be archived on this page.

Wed, Aug 21 3:17pm · Video Q&A about Valvular Heart Disease in Heart & Blood Health

From Dr. El Sabbagh: Great question. The ability to regain exercise tolerance after valve surgery depends on multiple factors, including whether not you have other comorbidities, your baseline level of fitness and functionality before surgery, the extent of damage to the heart from chronic valvular heart disease, medications as well as surgical outcomes. We encourage you to stay active as you are. If you feel that you are not reaching an adequate level of activity and fitness, please consult with your cardiologist to look for the possible causes and who can help you improve your functional capacity.

Wed, Aug 21 3:17pm · Video Q&A about Valvular Heart Disease in Heart & Blood Health

From Dr. El Sabbagh: I am unsure of what congenital aortic valve tear is. If you mean aortic dissection which is a tear in the wall of the aorta, then it depends on the location of the tear. If the tear is in the ascending aorta, then it would need to be replaced. If it is in the descending aorta, some of those can be treated medically. Aortic valve replacement might be needed if the aortic valve is affected.

Wed, Aug 21 3:15pm · Video Q&A about Valvular Heart Disease in Heart & Blood Health

From Dr. El Sabbagh: We use diameter measurements in managing aortic dilatation. We do not use diameter measurements of the aortic valve itself. Remember the aortic valve is connected to the aorta and if you were told that there is a diameter cut off, then this is probably alluding to what I mentioned, which is the aortic dilatation. It depends on many factors including the underlying cause of your aortic dilatation, such as bicuspid aortic valve or a connective tissue disease, as well as family history. If your aortic diameter is more than 3.5-4 cm, then you should follow-up with your cardiologist for investigating the cause and device thing a follow-up plan to monitor closely the rate of aortic dilatation.

Wed, Aug 21 3:15pm · Video Q&A about Valvular Heart Disease in Heart & Blood Health

From Dr. El Sabbagh: Yes. There are differences in prognosis or treatment of congenital versus acquired valvular heart disease. It depends on the type of congenital heart disease and acquired heart disease. Often, valvular heart disease from congenital heart disease is associated with other congenital defects that would be managed differently than acquired valvular heart disease.