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3 days ago · Get healthy, stay healthy while adhering to social distancing in Podcasts

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As people follow recommendations to stay home and practice social distancing during the COVID-19 pandemic, questions arise as to how to pass the time. There may be things you can do to help get and stay healthy.

On the Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Elizabeth Cozine, a Mayo Clinic family medicine physician, highlights the importance of eating well, exercising daily, and getting enough sleep to stay well while being stuck at home.

 

 

4 days ago · The latest on COVID-19 in Podcasts

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Mayo Clinic is committed to being a trusted source for COVID-19 (coronavirus) health information. During the pandemic, our Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast will cover the latest COVID-19 information.

On today’s Mayo Clinic Q&A podcast, Dr. Gregory Poland, an infectious diseases expert and head of Mayo Clinic’s Vaccine Research Group, shares the latest information on the COVID-19 pandemic.

Dr. Poland discusses the importance of testing for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19; work being done on antiviral medications; and how long social distancing might need to last.

 

 

Mon, Mar 9 7:31am · The Importance of Screening for Colorectal Cancer in Podcasts

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Among cancers that affect men and women, colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most cases of colorectal cancer begin as small, noncancerous (benign) clumps of cells called polyps. Over time, some polyps become colon cancer. Because these polyps may be small and produce few, if any, symptoms, health care providers recommend regular screening tests to prevent colon cancer. These screenings identify and remove polyps before they become cancerous. March is Colorectal Cancer Awareness month, a time to educate the public about the importance of colorectal cancer screening.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. John Kisiel, a Mayo Clinic gastroenterologist, will discuss colorectal cancer

 

 

Mon, Mar 2 10:21am · Minimally Invasive Surgery for Mitral Valve Repair in Podcasts

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Mitral valve repair and mitral valve replacement are procedures that may be performed to treat diseases of the mitral valve — the valve located between the left heart chambers (left atrium and left ventricle).

Several types of mitral valve disease exist. In mitral valve regurgitation, the flaps (leaflets) of the mitral valve don’t close tightly, causing blood to leak backward into the left atrium. This commonly occurs due to valve leaflets bulging back — a condition called mitral valve prolapse. In another condition, called mitral valve stenosis, the leaflets become thick or stiff, and they may fuse together. This results in a narrowed valve opening and reduced blood flow through the valve.

Treatment for mitral valve disease depends on the severity of your condition. Doctors may recommend surgery to repair or replace mitral valves for some people with mitral valve disease. Several surgical procedures exist to repair or replace mitral valves, including open-heart surgery or minimally invasive heart surgery.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. Richard Daly, a Mayo Clinic cardiovascular surgeon, explains robotic mitral valve repair surgery.

 

 

Mon, Feb 24 11:48am · Image-guided Diagnostics and Biopsy for Prostate Cancer in Podcasts

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Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer — second to skin cancer — among men in the U.S. One in 9 men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in his lifetime, according to the American Cancer Society. Screening is important because early detection greatly improves the chances of survival. While some types of prostate cancer grow slowly, and may need minimal or even no treatment, other types are aggressive and can spread quickly. If prostate cancer is suspected, a biopsy can confirm the diagnosis.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. Derek Lomas, a Mayo Clinic urologist, discusses prostate cancer, including a new biopsy method.

 

Mon, Feb 17 10:29am · Living an Active Life with Arthritis in Podcasts

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If you have arthritis, you are not alone. More than 50 million Americans suffer from arthritis and it is the No. 1 cause of disability in the country. Arthritis is the swelling and tenderness of one or more of your joints, causing joint pain and stiffness that typically worsen with age. Of the over 100 kinds of arthritis, the two most common are osteoarthritisand rheumatoid arthritis.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. John M. Davis III, a Mayo Clinic rheumatologist, discusses arthritis, and the latest edition of the book, “Mayo Clinic on Arthritis — How to Manage Pain and Lead an Active Life“.

 

Mon, Feb 10 10:34am · Dr. Prieto Explains Living-Kidney Donation in Podcasts

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A living-donor transplant is a surgical procedure to remove an organ or portion of an organ from a living person and place it in another person whose organ is no longer functioning properly.

The popularity of living-organ donation has increased dramatically in recent years as an alternative to deceased-organ donation due to the growing need for organs for transplantation and shortage of available deceased-donor organs. More than 6,000 living-organ donations are reported each year in the United States.

Living-kidney donation is the most common type of living-donor transplant. Individuals can donate one of their two kidneys, and the remaining kidney is able to perform the necessary functions. Living donors can also donate a portion of their liver, and the remaining liver regenerates, grows back to nearly its original size and performs its normal function.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. Mikel Prieto, a Mayo Clinic transplant surgeon. Dr. Prieto explains living kidney donation.

 

Mon, Feb 3 7:36am · Women's Heart Health and Cardio-Rheumatology in Podcasts

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Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of women. While men and women are affected by heart disease, the warning signs and symptoms can be quite different. The most common heart attack symptom in women is the same as in men — some type of chest pain, pressure or discomfort that lasts more than a few minutes, or comes and goes. But chest pain is not always severe or even the most noticeable symptom, particularly in women. Women often describe it as pressure or tightness. And it’s possible to have a heart attack without chest pain. February is recognized as American Heart Month to promote heart-healthy lifestyles, and increase awareness about their risk for heart disease and stroke.

On this Mayo Clinic Radio segment, Dr. Rekha Mankad, a Mayo Clinic cardiologist, will discuss women’s heart health. Dr. Mankad also will discuss the Mayo Clinic Cardio-Rheumatology Clinic, which brings together Mayo Clinic cardiologists and rheumatologists to address the connection between the heart and autoimmune diseases.