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2 days ago · How the Interventions in HABIT Might Benefit MCI Caregivers in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

Priscilla Amofa

This week we’d like to highlight more of the research some of our student partners at the University of Florida have been working on with our HABIT research study data that many of you participated in. This week’s blog comes from Priscilla Amofa, a psychology doctoral student at UF. We highlight the impact of HABIT on the person with MCI a lot in our research, but this week let’s focus on the impact on the caregivers.

Overview

In general, caregivers of persons with MCI experience increased distress and reduced quality of life. There is growing interest in exploring how behavioral interventions can help minimize this distress and reduction in quality of life.  This particular project explored how the different interventions that make up HABIT influence caregivers’ well-being for up to 12 months after training.

What We Did

In the HABIT program, caregivers are offered all 5 interventions – physical activity via yoga, computerized cognitive training via Brain HQ, wellness education, support groups, and memory support training. In our research trials supported by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI), our investigators withheld one of the five interventions in HABIT in order to better understand how each component impacted caregivers’ sense of burden, quality of life, mood, anxiety, and self-efficacy.

Results

Twelve months after the interventions, caregivers who did not receive the physical activity (yoga) intervention were more anxious, had more burden, and had decreased mood compared to caregivers who receive the intervention. In addition, caregivers who did not receive the wellness education intervention were more anxious than those who did receive it.

Conclusion

Overall, our results suggest that wellness education and yoga interventions are vital in either sustaining or improving caregiver burden, mood, and anxiety for up to 12 months after training.

Our results suggest that the core concepts of promoting self-care and resilience taught in the HABIT Program’s yoga and wellness education components are having a real, lasting impact on caregiver well-being.

Thank You

I would like to thank the Mayo Clinic HABIT Team and research sites who made this trial and intervention possible. I would also like to recognize my mentor Dr. Glenn Smith and all the other principle investigators for their support and guidance. And most importantly, I would like to express my appreciation to the study participants for their time and dedication.

– Priscilla Amofa

(Thank you Priscilla!)

How did HABIT impact you as a caregiver?  If you haven’t been through HABIT, what do you do to care for yourself and build your resilience as a caregiver?

 

Thu, May 14 9:29am · Day 7: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

1. I explored a new path on my bike ride, and it was fun. Saw a new-to-me older neighborhood, and rode almost to the high school. Some busy streets at times, but good to mix it up.
2. The weather cooled off this evening, so my kids spent a good hour after dinner playing outside. I'm grateful for hearing them laugh and enjoy themselves, and for the quiet I had inside.
3. I enjoyed making cookies with the younger kids in the afternoon. We made no-bake cookies, the ones that are basically chocolate peanut butter fudge held together by oatmeal. I hadn't had them for a long-time. Good thing we ate a healthy shrimp and rice dinner!

Tue, May 12 8:39am · Day 6: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

What a great idea to post to the other group! We'd love to hear what insights they have on the topic!

Fri, May 8 11:28am · Day 4: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

I love doing this when I feel stressed. It REALLY helps.I find I do it often when I have a lot going on, and I just finished one task, and must just right into the next. A couple slow breaths, and a reminder that the first thing is done, and now I can handle the next thing…. it goes a long way.

Wed, May 6 7:50am · Day 3: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

Oh and I bet you have lovely walks down where you guys live, Debbra! Let's enjoy the cool mornings while we can. What do you do when it gets hot?

Tue, May 5 12:37pm · Day 3: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

Hi @DrDonaLocke ! For me, bike rides are key. I think it isn't just the exercise but also being outside in nature. There is one point on my ride where I hit a trail through the preserve, and there is almost a "click" or "ahhhh" that goes off in my brain as I round that curve. I also find playing solitaire on my tablet after the kids are in bed helpful. Spider solitaire is just challenging enough to engage my brain to stop thinking about other stuff, but not too entertaining like other computer games or tv shows. Thanks for posting this!

Wed, Apr 29 11:58am · Introduction: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

All the Mayo Consultants are still here as far as I know, Debbra!

Wed, Apr 29 11:56am · Day 1: Creating your Resiliency Roadmap in Living with Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI)

Thanks @DrDonaLocke ! Fatigue, guilt, and generally feeling "burnt out" for me when I get stressed. Definitely high on the guilt lately as I try to do my best to balance work and homeschool!