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Tue, Feb 4 10:28am · Gastroparesis with severe symptoms! in Digestive Health

What helped me was botox to the lower stomach muscle. An injection was given in 3 places via endoscopy so food always goes into the small intestine. With gastroparesis, the stomach nerves can be so damaged that the contraction (peristalsis), is so slow that by the time the food reaches the lower stomach to enter the small intestine, the pyloric sphincter (muscle opening) closes, keeping the food in the stomach. That is what causes all the nausea, fullness, bloating and vomiting. It also can become the source of infection. Very serious. A special diet is needed of easily digested foods like white bread no wheat, oat, seeded breads, i.e.. I use gummy or chewable vitamins and liquid medicines also. March 2014 I had the procedure at Hershey Medical Center in PA and it is still working. Mine was severe. I would NOT get a pacemaker! There is no guarantee on how long this lasts but so far so good. I use liquid erythromycin as a prokinetic (muscle contractor) for the stomach. The procedure took only 15-20 minutes and no pain. Rare nausea and not that constant loss and gaining of weight, unable to tolerate smells and look at food…etc. A real blessing.

Tue, Feb 4 10:28am · Gastroparesis with severe symptoms! in Digestive Health

Very glad to hear! Gastroparesis is difficult to have so thank goodness this is working for you.

Tue, Feb 4 10:01am · Gastroparesis in Digestive Health

As I have written before,my gastroparesis was caused by my narcotics. Many medications can do this. Before botox was more popular and my Reglan was discontinued (I had Parkinson-like symptoms), doctors in Philadelphia wanted nto place a pacemaker in my stomach. A lawyer I knew told me about "botox" trials that were starting at another hospital in Philadelphia and his daughter had it…was doing great! Not wanting to travel into the city and so far away…but getting sicker and sicker…the erythromycin wasn't really helping as a prokinetic (making my stomach contract and emptying it)…my local GI doctor told me Hershey Medical Center was starting to use botox to the pyloric sphincter. I had it done January 2014 and still am 80% better! A God send!

Tue, Feb 4 10:01am · Gastroparesis in Digestive Health

Yes it can. I was on it many years and started having 6 months of terrible shaking, and almost the inability of writing my name. Then .a black box warning just came out stating the severe side effects you mentioned and that they may be permanent. I tried domperidone from Canada which helped but then used the erythromycin that my insurance paid for (125 mg 4 times a day as a prokinetic—stomach contraction). I was lucky that all the shakiness abated but took many months. It is very serious. AS a nurse, we used to use it on infants who had reflux. I never knew it had such severe side effects and like I said, I took it at least 6 or 7 years before it became so bad. NEVER again! Tardive dyskinesia is a horrible side effect that I have had patients with and I thank God I did not get that. The uncontrollable shakiness was enough. It almost was to the point I had to sign an X. My neurologist was so thorough always reviewing all my medicines and was the one who found the NEW alert!

Tue, Feb 4 10:01am · Gastroparesis in Digestive Health

with domperidone, CHF is not to be used by the way! Just a side note. A friend of mine is using it and has CHF and a pacemaker but the alert states not to use if heart failure. That is the problem with some of our doctors and getting medicine from Canada. She is paying $800/month and a friend told her of another pharmacy for $500/month. Erythromycin is an antibiotic that used in a low dose is a prokinetic,,,contracts the stomach muscle. Best of luck.

Tue, Feb 4 10:01am · Gastroparesis in Digestive Health

botox worked great for my gastroparesis. I had it down to the lower sphincter in the stomach and that way, when the food gets there, a hole is always open allowing it to enter the small intestine. Botox is injected into 3 small areas of the muscle. With stomach contracting so slow, by the time the food reaches the bottom, the muscle is closed. Food can collect and “rot” causing infection. Botox keeps the muscle slightly open allowing food to exit in small amounts preventing this. I had it done January 2014. The daily nausea and vomiting are gone and excessive weight loss. I still have limited foods I can eat but NO pacemaker. Botox is still working and is a blessing. I use liquid erythromycin (granules) to make my stomach contract and eat small meals. My vitamins are gummies or chewables and foods must be easily digestible. Breads have to be white (refined) nothing that takes long to digest causing further problems. A wonderful dietician helped me. I am not diabetic and it was caused by medications. As an RN, I never had encountered it. My case was/is severe. The botox really saved me. Best of luck! Joan

Thu, Jan 23 10:49am · Arachnoiditis: Trying to find a specialist in Spine Health

I have it also. One doctor wanted to implant a pain pump or a stimulator. I declined. I have had enough scarring from other surgeries and was scared wires would become like that in my spine no matter what he stated. He siad it would help my back fusion (chronic lumbar pain) and the arachnoiditis. Perhaps it would help. I have had scarring at incision lines on total knee and hip replacements so it has made me reluctant already having the scar tissue in the spinal canal (arachnoiditis).

Thu, Jan 23 10:49am · Arachnoiditis: Trying to find a specialist in Spine Health

Hi Buster brown I am Joan. I started with arachnoiditis in (probably 1994), but was diagnosed with a discogram in 1999 after a failed back fusion. I had gone to Hershey Medical Center and was told it was one of the most painful conditions there is and when my husband was alive, he was tested at Thomas Jefferson in Phila, PA (he didn’t have it thank goodness) and was told the same.There is no cure. The spinal nerves are full of scar tissue and you can not “mess” around with them.
More info is on the internet of causes, such as epidurals, spinal taps, viral infections, myelograms with certain dyes, FAILED back surgeries, certain medications placed in the spine, i,e. It is a very painful condition. Usually a “big”, medical center that trains physicians with an “acute” and “chronic” pain center knows all about this. Best of luck. I will have NO ONE mess with my spine where arachnoiditis is. No SPINAL TAPS, NO MEDICINE PUMPS there (one dr stated he wanted to place one where the scarring was…no way!),
Sometime pain patches on the skin work well besides oral medications. Even some medications you can rub on like Voltaren gel as an adjunct. There is no cure sadly but since I first was diagnosed, they have been many more discoveries of causes and trials in treatments. Pray you find relief!