Feeling Skipped Beats, Palpitations: What could this possibly be?

Posted by incrediblemulk98 @incrediblemulk98, Feb 18, 2017

I have an establishing appointment with a cardiologist Monday the 20th but I would just like to discuss what the results might be. My heart has had what I’d call an uncomfortable “presence” for about a month now. I can feel every single beat and I get palpitations and the sensation of skipped beats whenever I am active at all. I have cut out caffeine and cigarettes completely but my resting heart rate has continued to rise. It doesn’t go down below 60 even in my sleep anymore. I have medicine for my nerves but this does nothing for the discomfort or palpitations at all. I have zero energy and anytime I do much as get up it feels like my heart is being worked to its limit. A month ago I felt great and this has progressed so fast. I’m terrified. I’m only 25 years old but my dad died of congestive heart failure at 32 after a heart transplant. Any insight or thoughts would be much appreciated.

Liked by garden2018

@jigglejaws94

I’m sorry that you are having to deal with this and that you can’t get the help you need because of money. Why our hearts suddenly beat differently is sometimes a bit of a mystery. I fairly suddenly began having a fast heart rate and palpitations in my early 20s. My resting heart rate was 120. I had lots of PACS, PVCs, bigeminy and other rhythms — but everything was basically normal. Cardiologists often do not get as excited about palpitations as we do. I was on a beta blocker for 11 years and then went off. I had minimal problems with palpitations for close to 15 years and then my heart started pounding more and having more palpitations along with runs of supraventricular tachycardia. I had a complete work-up in 2013 — with echocardiogram, Holter monitor, stress test, and a nuclear stress test — all of which were normal. My cardiologist honestly said, “you have a special heart”. A cardiologist in my 20s said I have a hyperdynamic heart. Palpitations are annoying – at best. Last year I had a Reveal LINQ internal cardiac monitor placed due to a change in my palpitations. So far, my heart has been behaving and that has not returned. So why the sudden onset of palpitations and fast heart rate in my 20s — who knows? Sometimes POTS (postural orthostatic tachycardia syndrome) can account for many symptoms that are similar to mine. Anxiety and fear about what is going on will surely make your heart beat more wildly. I certainly hope you can get the care and evaluation that you need in the very near future.

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Ive applied for the aid and hopefully they can push it through by the time I’ve scheduled the tests. I’ll let everyone know what the results are.

@incrediblemulk98 Yeah! Looking forward to hearing from you! Teresa

Is it normal to have a god awful headache after a treadmill stress test?

@hopeful33250

@incrediblemulk98 Yeah! Looking forward to hearing from you! Teresa

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Stress test showed a 1 second arrythmia that quickly self corrected so now I’m wearing the monitor until 3:00 pm today. Headache is finally clearing up from the stress test. I pushed myself to 190 BPM which probably wasn’t a good idea because I was winded around 170 but I wanted them to get the best results.

HOLTER MONITOR REPORT

ORDERING PHYSICIAN: Dr. Thippeswamy Murthy

READING PHYSICIAN: Dr. David Tian

INDICATIONS: Palpitations

FINDINGS:
The patient’s rhythm was predominantly sinus rhythm
Heart rate varied from 45 bpm to 136 bpm. The patient’s average heart rate was 79 bpm.
The patient had a holter monitor tracing done for 24 hours.
The patient had 2 (0.0%) ventricular ectopic activity.
The patient had 2 (0.0%) supraventricular ectopy.
The longest R/R interval was 1.4 seconds.

CONCLUSION:
Baseline rhythm is sinus rhythm with an average HR 79 bpm (range 45-136 bpm).
Rare PVCs and PACs.
No significant arrhythmias.
Symptoms of “fluttering” and dizziness were recorded. These symptoms were associated with normal sinus rhythm and sinus tachycardia.

This is my first holtier monitor. I had a second holtier monitor done because I didn’t experience any PVCs during the test. I did this time and am waiting on the readings.

Hi @incrediblemulk98,

As you may know, we aren’t permitted to give medical advice on Connect, but I wanted to thank you for sharing your report.

According to this link from Mayo Clinic, if you don’t have irregular heart rhythms while you wear a Holter monitor, your doctor may recommend something else, such as an event recorder. You can read details here:
http://mayocl.in/2nxlYeO

Please keep us updated, and let us know about your second report.

@incrediblemulk98

I believe I have low blood magnesium. I have Celiac disease and have been on a PPI since October so while I wait for the cardiologist to approve my aid I’m going to supplement magnesium and get a serum test for magnesium (my potassium and calcium are fine).

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I strongly agree with everyone else here in that the best thing you can do right now is calm down and have faith in your Dr.s.
Among many problems I have one is a rapid heart beat. For years I would tell DR.s how I could “feel” my heart jump and I was just ignored because they could find nothing. After a surgery they couldn’t get my heart rate to ever go below 100 and hung out around 140 most of the time, especially if I was active. I just lived day to day until one summer afternoon my heart rate just went crazy!!!!! I felt a bit “off” and measured my oxygen levels and my heart rate. Finally called my husband and had him take me to E.R. because heart rate was stuck at 280 . The Dr.s felt their only option was to stop my heart and let it start again to establish a more natural rythym (which it did) they gave me ANOTHER RX to keep my heart slowed down and it is back to a steady 100 give or take a pump or two lol
So don’t worry so many things sound so scary and serious and end up being a distraction we learn to live with. I will send up a prayer for you.

Good morning. The things you are describing sound like much of what I was going through for many years until I went to Mayo. I have a fast heart rate; up to 180 and at 145 when I was sleeping. I also can feel my heart beating. After a holster monitor test Mayo was able to catch that fast heart beat and they were able to go from there. Trust that they have your best interest in mind, they work as a team and will do what is best for YOU and YOUR situation. You will not be pushed into a “one size fits all” situation. Have faith, stay strong. Hoping you will find what you need.

I will be anxious to see what your cardiologist says. When I wake in the mornings I feel a very pronounced heartbeat. I also have palpitations especially in the evenings. I recently was diagnosed with borderline pulmonary hypertension after having an echo and did a sleep study and now wear a CPAP at night. My cardiologist wants me to wear a heart monitor for 24 hours to see what’s going on with the palpitations.

@incrediblemulk98

I got in with cardiologist. My pulse pressure is 60 (120/60) and was repeated several times over the course of an hour for accuracy. My pulse never dropped below 100 and the doctor was able to hear the pauses in my palpitations. He walked me into the hall and said that I needed an immediate stress echo and a holtier monitor to wear afterwards. However after the receptionist heard I have no insurance she refused to do the test or even schedule me one for the future. I’m terrified. Something is obviously wrong. I’ve been crying all day. I called around and every cardiologist in my area is the same way and I don’t even have another 200 dollars to just shell out on a doctor again anyway to be told oops sorry can’t help you. My father died of CHF at 30 and my number is running up. I don’t smoke or drink or anything and was pretty active up to this point. This isn’t fair and I don’t know what to do except panic. I’ve applied for financial aid that I’m positive I’ll get (I am a single father and bring in less than a grand a month) but it’s gonna take at least a month to be approved.

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A relative recently had a cancer diagnosis and no insurance. Someone set up a Go Fund Me account on Facebook and friends, family, coworkers, stranger, etc pledged enough for her treatment. If you get this set up, please let us know so we can help. In the meantime may God comfort you.

Your 24-hour Holter monitor was completely normal. There was sinus rhythm throughout occasional sinus or normal tachycardia(fast heart rate). No abnormal rhythm or conduction defects

——–Viewed by Matthew Mulkey on 3/17/2017 4:11 PM——–
Good afternoon,

Your holter monitor and and stress tests were normal.
There is no evidence of heart disease to explain your symptoms
Please follow up with Dr. Moraitis.

Best regards,
Dr. Murthy

Study Result
Impression
HOLTER MONITOR REPORT

ORDERING PHYSICIAN: Dr. Thippeswamy Murthy
READING PHYSICIAN: Dr. Dr. Thippeswamy Murthy
INDICATIONS: Palpitations

FINDINGS:
The patient’s rhythm was predominantly sinus rhythm
Heart rate varied from 52 bpm to 135 bpm. The patient’s average heart rate was 81 bpm.
The patient had a holter monitor tracing done for 24 hours.
The patient had 15 (0.0%) ventricular ectopic activity.
The patient had 5 (0.0%) supraventricular ectopy.
The longest R/R interval was 1.5 seconds.
No symptoms were reported by the patient.

CONCLUSION:
1. Sinus rhythm throughout
2. Rare ectopy
3. No sustained arrhythmias
4. No conduction defects
5. Patient events correlated with sinus tachycardia

There’s nothing wrong with me

That’s great news, @incrediblemulk98 !

I’ve lived with palpitations, supra ventricular tachycardia (SVT), for 30 years, with many of the symptoms that you and Connect members describe, where my heart would beat at 210 bpm. It gets more difficult to manage as we grow older, and I finally had an ablation done, two years ago at Mayo Clinic. I cannot say enough about the cardiologists, my healthcare team, and the care I received there!

Keep us updated, and please let us know if you have any questions.

It is hard to know what may be going on. I’m sure your physician will check your thyroid levels and other things that can influence your heart rate. I had a high resting heart rate starting in my 20s and was put on a beta blocker for 11 years which kept my rate lower and helped limit palpitations. I went off of this in my 30s. Then all of a sudden in 2013, I started having issues with really strong palpitations, fast rate, etc. I had a full cardiac work-up but nothing showed up. My cardiologist said I have a “special” heart — oh how endearing. Not. I likely have some autoimmune issues going on also and so am no longer surprised when my body does odd things. I hope your case is figured out easily and that it is nothing seriously.

@jigglejaws94

It is hard to know what may be going on. I’m sure your physician will check your thyroid levels and other things that can influence your heart rate. I had a high resting heart rate starting in my 20s and was put on a beta blocker for 11 years which kept my rate lower and helped limit palpitations. I went off of this in my 30s. Then all of a sudden in 2013, I started having issues with really strong palpitations, fast rate, etc. I had a full cardiac work-up but nothing showed up. My cardiologist said I have a “special” heart — oh how endearing. Not. I likely have some autoimmune issues going on also and so am no longer surprised when my body does odd things. I hope your case is figured out easily and that it is nothing seriously.

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@jigglejaws94 Hi, Jaws. Actually, I am glad to hear that you have learned that you have some autoimmune issues going on. That means some doctor has been truthful with you. Let me name just a few tests and assays you should have had done by now, and if you have not, then step on your doctor’s toes until s/he gets them done. (1) ANA (2) BUN (3) SERUM FreeLiteChain Assay (Kappa reference range <1.6 mg/dL, Lambda<2 mg/dL) (3) 24 hour urine &Protein collection. Protein <0.5g /24 hours. There are several others which you can learn from Mayo, Amyloidosis Foundation, ARUP, Alnylam, or even from my Amyloidosis site, https://bit.Ly/1w7j4j8. The stats show that about 10 of 1,000,000 persons will be diagnosed each year, but these are misleading. I believe the actual number of persons who actually would be diagnosed if local GPs and the FDA would actively try to save these folk’s lives, would be about 100 per million per year. The rest just suffer and die without being diagnosed.

@jigglejaws94

It is hard to know what may be going on. I’m sure your physician will check your thyroid levels and other things that can influence your heart rate. I had a high resting heart rate starting in my 20s and was put on a beta blocker for 11 years which kept my rate lower and helped limit palpitations. I went off of this in my 30s. Then all of a sudden in 2013, I started having issues with really strong palpitations, fast rate, etc. I had a full cardiac work-up but nothing showed up. My cardiologist said I have a “special” heart — oh how endearing. Not. I likely have some autoimmune issues going on also and so am no longer surprised when my body does odd things. I hope your case is figured out easily and that it is nothing seriously.

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Oh yes — I’ve had lots of lab work done. Actually I’ve had several doctors who have mentioned that the kinds of problems that I have are likely autoimmune — but so far, nothing is terribly positive — and this has been going on for over 15 years. The adage is — If it is autoimmune, time will tell. True but I’ve always felt like I don’t want to just wait until my body fails in a certain area. I would rather be more proactive and do the kinds of things that lend towards healing. I realize that in the realm of autoimmune — that there is a definite vagueness especially because each disease can affect EACH patient so differently. I believe that in a broad sense many physicians don’t have a clue about autoimmune disease. Thankfully, mine does.

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