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ProfRoc
@profroc

Posts: 2
Joined: Jul 23, 2016

Vitamin C for cancer treatment

Posted by @profroc, Jul 23, 2016

Science magazine in the past year has recognized that vitamin C may be able to treat some forms of cancer. I was fortunate that my research as a biochemistry professor over 38 years had me aware of this when I developed cancer. It was superficial bladder carcinoma SBC), which kills 16,000 annually in the US. After removal, it recurs up to 90% of the time within 5 years with the current best treatment, BCG therapy, which is expensive, time consuming and required for life.

I developed superficial bladder carcinoma (aggressive invasive) 5 years ago. It was removed, and I began BCG therapy. But as a vitamin C (AA) researcher, I worked with 2 expert cancer research and physician friends to develop an AA dosage and therapy that I began after that year of BCG. Taking 2g of AA orally twice a day two consecutive days each week produces a concentration of AA in the bladder that is likely to kill cancer cells. I have published the clinical trial where we developed this dosage, and a research poster is available on line explaining how vitamin C may treat many cancers, esp. SBC. I had a biopsy of my own SBC a few weeks ago, and I continue cancer free after 5 years.

With the invention of liposomal vitamin C, it is now possible to increase serum concentration of vitamin C orally, without the requirement for intravenous vitamin C. I recommend discussing this with a knowledgeable cancer physician if you are dealing with cancer.

REPLY

Hi, @profroc, glad to see you here on Connect on a subject near to my belt! I too had superficial bladder carcinoma (SBC) diagnosed 7 years ago. One tumor came into view when my urologist removed prostate tissue. Fortunately, the tumor was low grade. Even so, within a few months, a cystoscopic examination of my bladder spotted a dozen more which were removed in a procedure performed at an ambulatory surgical center. In this case, BCG solution was injected into the bladder to put an end to further farming of the florid tumors.

After that, I had 5 more treatments of BCG solution, which ended my encounter with bladder cancer; it’s been five years now without any tumors appearing in my regular cystoscopic examinations. The literature I have reviewed on SBC has not been as negative about BCG as you indicated in terms of recurrence rates or in terms of expense. My HMO didn’t hesitate to pay for the therapy; my time was burdened for one day in each of six weeks; and I have had no further BCG treatments for over 5 years, not for life.

I am glad to know about — and see others share — your insights on the potential for vitamin C treatments to prevent superficial bladder tumors. Would you expand on your reference to AA therapy? It is unfamiliar to me. I’d also appreciate knowing where to find more details about liposomal vitamin C, serum concentration of vitamin C, and intravenous vitamin C. Thanks.

Liked by JohnWBurns

I was always a huge admirer of Linus Pauling but the data on vitamin C and cancer has been all over the place. He took mega doses and lasted into his 90’s when he succumbed to the prostate cancer treated in his 60’s, as you know doubt know. Do you have a url to the study? Like to see it since I’m at risk for bladder cancer having had radiation for prostate cancer. Thanks.

@profroc @predictable and @johnwburns I appreciate this discussion on Vitamin C and cancer – a topic often discussed among health care professionals and patients alike.

According to this overview from the National Cancer Institute http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_1
“High-dose vitamin C has been studied as a treatment for patients with cancer since the 1970s.” The evidence remains inconclusive.

Other high-level points include:
– Vitamin C is a nutrient found in food and dietary supplements. It is an antioxidant and also plays a key role in making collagen (see Question 1).
– High-dose vitamin C may be given by intravenous (IV) infusion (through a vein into the bloodstream) or orally (taken by mouth). When taken by intravenous infusion, vitamin C can reach much higher levels in the blood than when the same amount is taken by mouth (see Question 1).
(see Question 2).
– Laboratory studies have shown that high doses of vitamin C may slow the growth and spread of prostate, pancreatic, liver, colon, and other types of cancer cells (see Question 5).
– Some laboratory and animal studies have shown that combining vitamin C with anticancer therapies may be helpful, while other studies have shown that certain forms of vitamin C may make chemotherapy less effective (see Question 5).
– Animal studies have shown that high-dose vitamin C treatment blocks tumor growth in certain models of pancreatic, liver, prostate, and ovarian cancers, sarcoma, and malignant mesothelioma (see Question 5).
– Some human studies of high-dose IV vitamin C in patients with cancer have shown improved quality of life, as well as improvements in physical, mental, and emotional functions, symptoms of fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss (see Question 6).
– Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials (see Question 7).
– While generally approved as a dietary supplement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of IV high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition (see Question 9).

The questions and answers that this overview refers to can be found in this NCI article http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_3

@colleenyoung

@profroc @predictable and @johnwburns I appreciate this discussion on Vitamin C and cancer – a topic often discussed among health care professionals and patients alike.

According to this overview from the National Cancer Institute http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_1
“High-dose vitamin C has been studied as a treatment for patients with cancer since the 1970s.” The evidence remains inconclusive.

Other high-level points include:
– Vitamin C is a nutrient found in food and dietary supplements. It is an antioxidant and also plays a key role in making collagen (see Question 1).
– High-dose vitamin C may be given by intravenous (IV) infusion (through a vein into the bloodstream) or orally (taken by mouth). When taken by intravenous infusion, vitamin C can reach much higher levels in the blood than when the same amount is taken by mouth (see Question 1).
(see Question 2).
– Laboratory studies have shown that high doses of vitamin C may slow the growth and spread of prostate, pancreatic, liver, colon, and other types of cancer cells (see Question 5).
– Some laboratory and animal studies have shown that combining vitamin C with anticancer therapies may be helpful, while other studies have shown that certain forms of vitamin C may make chemotherapy less effective (see Question 5).
– Animal studies have shown that high-dose vitamin C treatment blocks tumor growth in certain models of pancreatic, liver, prostate, and ovarian cancers, sarcoma, and malignant mesothelioma (see Question 5).
– Some human studies of high-dose IV vitamin C in patients with cancer have shown improved quality of life, as well as improvements in physical, mental, and emotional functions, symptoms of fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss (see Question 6).
– Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials (see Question 7).
– While generally approved as a dietary supplement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of IV high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition (see Question 9).

The questions and answers that this overview refers to can be found in this NCI article http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_3

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Very interested to know more about Vitamin C IV and also the liposomal C you mentioned. I have been told that I have Essential Thrombocytosis and or Polycythemia Vera and am wondering if this would be useful therapy. My Dr. Also thinks I have Lyme even though I tested negative and feels the Vitamīn C would help that situation. At least it won’t hurt right? Have tested negative for G6PB and my kidney function is normal. JAK2 positive. Thanks.

My husband has been diagnosed w/ bladder cancer PTa. We’ve been told by his urologist that large doses of vitamin C are irritating to the bladder and can consequently add to side effects w/ BCG. Sounds like irritation while urinating is the main reason people are not able to continue w/ BCG. Anyone know of research on this issue?

@karper

My husband has been diagnosed w/ bladder cancer PTa. We’ve been told by his urologist that large doses of vitamin C are irritating to the bladder and can consequently add to side effects w/ BCG. Sounds like irritation while urinating is the main reason people are not able to continue w/ BCG. Anyone know of research on this issue?

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Hi @karper,
I'm tagging @predictable on this discussion. If there is research on vitamin C, bladder cancer and BCG treatment, he'll be able to find it.

You may also wish to join these Connect discussions:
– Bladder cancer http://mayocl.in/2kpSr5n
– Small cell bladder cancer http://mayocl.in/2rsHaYD

Has you husband started treatment?

@karper

My husband has been diagnosed w/ bladder cancer PTa. We’ve been told by his urologist that large doses of vitamin C are irritating to the bladder and can consequently add to side effects w/ BCG. Sounds like irritation while urinating is the main reason people are not able to continue w/ BCG. Anyone know of research on this issue?

Jump to this post

Hi @karper, I hope to clear up some apprehensions about BCG treatment of non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (pTa). I’m a 7-year survivor of a dozen of those small papillary tumors that sprouted on the lining of my bladder. Similarly, my good friend had the same experience about six months before me, and that proved especially fortunate for two reasons: 1) BCG intravesical therapy prevented recurrence of the tumors after the initial group was removed in a TURP procedure and 2) my friend is a physician and was director of medical service quality for a very large HMO in Washington DC. For those experiences, I can suggest the following for you to discuss in detail with your husband’s urologist:

1 – Bladder irritation comes mainly from three sources: Excess vitamin C (more than 2,000 mg per day) consumption from all sources; interstitial cystitis (bladder inflammation); the BCG solution itself after the second or third weekly treatment.
2 – Two of these sources are not attributable to the BCG, but to careless dosages of vitamin C or to prior inflammation from other causes.
3 – Urologists deal with Irritation caused by the BCG by reducing the BCG dosage and/or allowing additional time between the infusions.

I suspect that the urologist was alerting you to the possibility of an irritation side-effect, but not suggesting that it would make BCG an unwise therapy. In my case, I don’t recall any irritation in a full six-week course of BCG therapy, not does my doctor friend. What I do remember is my urologist telling me that BCG is an immunotherapy that calls in your immune system to eliminate cancer seeds in the bladder lining and that bladder irritation is “often perceived as favorable immunological responses to the therapy. Nearly 80% of patients can expect to experience this type of reaction.”

That direct quote is from an article on the Medscape web site at http://bit.ly/2s5gqdJ. You may find helpful information there. I hope it helps relieve your apprehensions. Keep us posted so we can continue our conversation in the days ahead.

@colleenyoung

@profroc @predictable and @johnwburns I appreciate this discussion on Vitamin C and cancer – a topic often discussed among health care professionals and patients alike.

According to this overview from the National Cancer Institute http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_1
“High-dose vitamin C has been studied as a treatment for patients with cancer since the 1970s.” The evidence remains inconclusive.

Other high-level points include:
– Vitamin C is a nutrient found in food and dietary supplements. It is an antioxidant and also plays a key role in making collagen (see Question 1).
– High-dose vitamin C may be given by intravenous (IV) infusion (through a vein into the bloodstream) or orally (taken by mouth). When taken by intravenous infusion, vitamin C can reach much higher levels in the blood than when the same amount is taken by mouth (see Question 1).
(see Question 2).
– Laboratory studies have shown that high doses of vitamin C may slow the growth and spread of prostate, pancreatic, liver, colon, and other types of cancer cells (see Question 5).
– Some laboratory and animal studies have shown that combining vitamin C with anticancer therapies may be helpful, while other studies have shown that certain forms of vitamin C may make chemotherapy less effective (see Question 5).
– Animal studies have shown that high-dose vitamin C treatment blocks tumor growth in certain models of pancreatic, liver, prostate, and ovarian cancers, sarcoma, and malignant mesothelioma (see Question 5).
– Some human studies of high-dose IV vitamin C in patients with cancer have shown improved quality of life, as well as improvements in physical, mental, and emotional functions, symptoms of fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss (see Question 6).
– Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials (see Question 7).
– While generally approved as a dietary supplement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of IV high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition (see Question 9).

The questions and answers that this overview refers to can be found in this NCI article http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_3

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Hi just saw an MPN specialist and like you I have been told I may be ET or border line PV. I have been on hydrea from my local Hemotologist for 7 weeks and platelets went from 805 to 330.
But the specialist said my Hemoglobin and Hematocrits are at the end of high normal. So he wants to do a sono and a BMB. I understsnd ET and PV can mimic each other. I am JAK2 positive.
Can I ask what your numbers were at disgnosis and how you are responding?
I see this was posted a year ago.

@colleenyoung

@profroc @predictable and @johnwburns I appreciate this discussion on Vitamin C and cancer – a topic often discussed among health care professionals and patients alike.

According to this overview from the National Cancer Institute http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_1
“High-dose vitamin C has been studied as a treatment for patients with cancer since the 1970s.” The evidence remains inconclusive.

Other high-level points include:
– Vitamin C is a nutrient found in food and dietary supplements. It is an antioxidant and also plays a key role in making collagen (see Question 1).
– High-dose vitamin C may be given by intravenous (IV) infusion (through a vein into the bloodstream) or orally (taken by mouth). When taken by intravenous infusion, vitamin C can reach much higher levels in the blood than when the same amount is taken by mouth (see Question 1).
(see Question 2).
– Laboratory studies have shown that high doses of vitamin C may slow the growth and spread of prostate, pancreatic, liver, colon, and other types of cancer cells (see Question 5).
– Some laboratory and animal studies have shown that combining vitamin C with anticancer therapies may be helpful, while other studies have shown that certain forms of vitamin C may make chemotherapy less effective (see Question 5).
– Animal studies have shown that high-dose vitamin C treatment blocks tumor growth in certain models of pancreatic, liver, prostate, and ovarian cancers, sarcoma, and malignant mesothelioma (see Question 5).
– Some human studies of high-dose IV vitamin C in patients with cancer have shown improved quality of life, as well as improvements in physical, mental, and emotional functions, symptoms of fatigue, nausea and vomiting, pain, and appetite loss (see Question 6).
– Intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials (see Question 7).
– While generally approved as a dietary supplement, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved the use of IV high-dose vitamin C as a treatment for cancer or any other medical condition (see Question 9).

The questions and answers that this overview refers to can be found in this NCI article http://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/cam/patient/vitamin-c-pdq#section/_3

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Welcome to Connect, @mjfp49. You mention that you have have Essential Thrombocytosis and/or Polycythemia Vera and that you are JAK2 positive. I think you might appreciate following the Blood Cancers & Disorders group https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/blood-cancers-disorders/

Here are some discussions relevant for you:
– JAK2 Mutation – Effects and Questions https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/jak2-mutation-effects-and-questions/
– Polycythemia Vera and Nutritional Ketosis https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/polycythemia-vera-and-nutritional-ketosis/

ProfRoc, I stumbled upon your post today and was encouraged by your information about vitamin c and bladder cancer recurrence. I had successful surgery in July 2010 (age 60) for a T1-G3 high-grade 3 cm bladder tumor and then took the standard BCG treatments with no complications. Soon after my surgery, a friend of mine who was very much into homeopathic treatment suggested several herbs/supplements for me to take to boost my immune system. For the past eight years, at the top of my list have been maitake d-fraction mushroom, astragalus, and milk thistle (all in liquid form). A fourth is cat's claw in capsules. Last December I happened to read about the benefits of sulforaphane in broccoli sprouts and began taking this supplement as well. I have been taking 500 mg of vitamin c 2x a day for several years and now will follow your vitamin c plan. I have a urine cytology done every 3 months, and every sample comes back full of atypical cells. Four times in the past two years, the pathologist has reported "suspicious for malignancy," but follow-up CT scans and cystoscopies have found no cancer. I am a firm believer that all of the herbs and supplements I take, along with BCG treatment, have kept me from having a recurrence of bladder cancer. Do you happen to take any of the herbs/supplements that I have mentioned? David Stiles

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