Visiting Medical Facilities with your loved one

Posted by proff @proff, Jan 28 8:40am

Repeatedly I have encountered a problem when taking my husband to a doctor or dentist. When making the appointment, I tell the scheduler to note in the file that this man is in stage 6-7 dementia. Please make sure your doctor gets this. And I have told – EVERYONE – who assists us of the situation. It appears that most do not "get it". The last time I needed ER, both the nurse and the doctor told me separately "Your husband appears to be confused. You should take him to his primary to see what is wrong." When the dentist came into the waiting room to say he didn't know why he was there, I asked if she had been notified and she hadn't. The receptionist's response? "Not a problem." Well it was a problem. I have found myself in-servicing (because I have had training) security people and ICU nurses. The nurse on duty at his care center said she hates to encounter these professionals because they are afraid of Alz. / Dementia patients and don't deal effectively with them. There is so much training available including terrific free videos by Teepa Snow. How do we get the point across. I'm terrified that in a Sundowning event, if the police were involved, they would taze or shoot him.

Liked by FWW

May I add my concerns to yours and my caregiving situation has not progressed to where yours apparently is at this point. In our journey, I have yet to encounter a physician’s office in which the protocols/procedures include an option for a statutory Power of Attorney assigning medical decision making oversight to me as spouse. I must continually remind both physicians and staff that they have a copy in their file and that I must be included in the discussions. Most of them simply have not been trained in what this means; it no doubt adds to their overwhelming responsibilities.
Based on personal experiences I had in many years working in the education/legal administrative area, I see this as part of the destructive and conflicting massive overreaching regulatory federal and state agencies.
Agencies at both the federal and state levels—and now even local region and county levels—almost never rescind these conflicting demands, but rather, they only know to add more and more.

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Well, Verilee, we have a big job ahead of us. Now that my husband is in care and I have more time – with experience in teaching workshops – I'm looking for training to train medical personnel. Perhaps if we advised that they were "risk-exposed" it might cut some ice! But, their care is less effective and they add more stress to caregivers when they don't "get it".

Liked by virginianaeve

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@proff and @verilee1776 oh my gosh! I just saw your discussion. As a nurse, I never ran into this kind of situation. When you say “I have a copy of his power of attorney” are you referring to a medical durable power of attorney? Not a legal POA for business affairs. Do you give them a copy with each visit?
Ever since I was diagnosed with a serious autoimmune disease 3years ago, my husband has accompanied me to every appointment. The doctors,nurses, therapists know that he asks and answers questions that I’m unable to.
I like the idea of doing an inservice for all the staff, but find out from the office what’s a good time and make it short. Maybe bring lunch or a treat! Be very positive like you’re just reminding them of something they already know.
You might also find out if the doctors are part of a larger practice with a practice manager. You could approach this person, explain what happens, and ask about doing an informative inservice.
Be advocates for your spouses!

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@becsbuddy

@proff and @verilee1776 oh my gosh! I just saw your discussion. As a nurse, I never ran into this kind of situation. When you say “I have a copy of his power of attorney” are you referring to a medical durable power of attorney? Not a legal POA for business affairs. Do you give them a copy with each visit?
Ever since I was diagnosed with a serious autoimmune disease 3years ago, my husband has accompanied me to every appointment. The doctors,nurses, therapists know that he asks and answers questions that I’m unable to.
I like the idea of doing an inservice for all the staff, but find out from the office what’s a good time and make it short. Maybe bring lunch or a treat! Be very positive like you’re just reminding them of something they already know.
You might also find out if the doctors are part of a larger practice with a practice manager. You could approach this person, explain what happens, and ask about doing an informative inservice.
Be advocates for your spouses!

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Hi Becky, right now most physicians are part of medical groups. We have 3 major groups and all are affiliated with our hospitals. The first issue is getting certification and finding where that training may be attained, the second is getting into the continuing education for medical facilities. One rub is that, at least the last time I checked, Wisconsin has no mandated continuing education requirement so it is taken care of by the hospitals. Every member of the staff needs to have some form of education from reception to security, to nursing stations, to the physicians themselves. So, it is a matter of setting up programs through the hospital systems. Even if they only watched the free Teepa Snow videos on YouTube, they'd be ahead!

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