Share this:
annbainbridge
@annbainbridge

Posts: 5
Joined: Nov 02, 2016

Vasovagal Syncope

Posted by @annbainbridge, Dec 6, 2016

My husband was diagnosed with this was having a hard time standing in working. I will take any information

REPLY

Hi Ann, welcome to Connect. I’m tagging @danielnavarrete365 and @pammiegapeach who have talked about about vasovagal syncope on Connect quite some time ago. They may be able to share personal experiences with you.

In the meantime, here is some further reading from Mayo Clinic
– Vasovagal syncope http://mayocl.in/1WrBzH8

The section on causes states: “Vasovagal syncope occurs when the part of your nervous system that regulates heart rate and blood pressure malfunctions in response to a trigger, such as the sight of blood. Your heart rate slows, and the blood vessels in your legs widen (dilate.) This allows blood to pool in your legs, which lowers your blood pressure. Combined, the drop in blood pressure and slowed heart rate quickly reduce blood flow to your brain, and you faint.”

Standing for long periods can be trigger. Does your husband have to stand a lot for his work?

This happens to me and also my 15-year-old daughter, and I wonder if it’s genetic because it started with her when she was only four-years-old, and she didn’t know that it happens to me. She is triggered more easily than me; she daughter can’t even read a book about someone getting cut without it happening. For me, it’s only happened due to my own medical treatment. I get hot and start sweating, and then turn cold but am still covered with sweat. I’ve never passed out but have come close. I always have to lay down, though.

@annbainbridge what triggers your husband?

@colleenyoung

Hi Ann, welcome to Connect. I’m tagging @danielnavarrete365 and @pammiegapeach who have talked about about vasovagal syncope on Connect quite some time ago. They may be able to share personal experiences with you.

In the meantime, here is some further reading from Mayo Clinic
– Vasovagal syncope http://mayocl.in/1WrBzH8

The section on causes states: “Vasovagal syncope occurs when the part of your nervous system that regulates heart rate and blood pressure malfunctions in response to a trigger, such as the sight of blood. Your heart rate slows, and the blood vessels in your legs widen (dilate.) This allows blood to pool in your legs, which lowers your blood pressure. Combined, the drop in blood pressure and slowed heart rate quickly reduce blood flow to your brain, and you faint.”

Standing for long periods can be trigger. Does your husband have to stand a lot for his work?

Jump to this post

Yes he does stand for long periods of time. He says when he sits for 1/2 or more after he starts working for a few minutes is when his triggers. Then he feels bad for the rest of that day and the the next.

@kdubois

This happens to me and also my 15-year-old daughter, and I wonder if it’s genetic because it started with her when she was only four-years-old, and she didn’t know that it happens to me. She is triggered more easily than me; she daughter can’t even read a book about someone getting cut without it happening. For me, it’s only happened due to my own medical treatment. I get hot and start sweating, and then turn cold but am still covered with sweat. I’ve never passed out but have come close. I always have to lay down, though.

@annbainbridge what triggers your husband?

Jump to this post

My husbands trigger is after he’s been sitting for a while when he gets up and starts to work then it can happen. And then the next day he feels terrible

Interesting because it’s happening with different than the usual triggers, and the fact that he can’t recover from it quickly makes it sound as if there’s more going on. Has he seen a cardiologist or nephrologist?

Today we went to his neurologist that looked at the test and he believes it’s his veins are not contracting and up so he’s putting him on a medicine. Them he will go for a three hour lab on his sugar and doing some other bloodwork and sending him to another doctor I don’t exactly know what he called him but he does have a cardiologist and he does have a linq in his heart so they are monitoring that so we wait for this Blood test to be done. His heart rate never changed when they did the tilt table test.

I was diagnosed with vasogal syncope many years ago by a cadiologist who happened to be a big authority on fainting. I get it from anything that stresses my body. Caffiene, exercising, dangerous situations. I did a tilt table study where they gave me a drug that stimulated a caffiene and my blood pressure plummeted and heart rate too. I was told by the doctor that vasogal meant the veins were not doing their job pushing the blood through. Two things I have found out have helped: do not rise quickly from a sitting position, and if feeling faint you need to breathe deeply and slowly. When you feel faint you tend to get nervous and hyperventilate, so slowing down your breathing can help and deep breathes get in more oxygen into your lungs. I have small veins so that may contribute to it. Following my rules and avoiding stimulants has made me free of fainting for many years. Vasogal syncope is a general diagnosis so it can have many different causes.

@johnhans

I was diagnosed with vasogal syncope many years ago by a cadiologist who happened to be a big authority on fainting. I get it from anything that stresses my body. Caffiene, exercising, dangerous situations. I did a tilt table study where they gave me a drug that stimulated a caffiene and my blood pressure plummeted and heart rate too. I was told by the doctor that vasogal meant the veins were not doing their job pushing the blood through. Two things I have found out have helped: do not rise quickly from a sitting position, and if feeling faint you need to breathe deeply and slowly. When you feel faint you tend to get nervous and hyperventilate, so slowing down your breathing can help and deep breathes get in more oxygen into your lungs. I have small veins so that may contribute to it. Following my rules and avoiding stimulants has made me free of fainting for many years. Vasogal syncope is a general diagnosis so it can have many different causes.

Jump to this post

It sounds like you have your all figured out. I hope my husband can get to that point. Thank you for your helpful information.

Liked by johnhans

Please login or register to post a reply.