Too much exercise?

Posted by woot @woot, Nov 25, 2020

I’ve had a long-running dialogue with myself: “Go on! Do it! Take that walk. You’ll never improve if you don’t “ But then I say, “give me a break. I’m 82, I had a lobectomy, I have bronchiectasis,
don’t I deserve a break?” But I do it. I go for that walk. I force myself to walk the third loop of the (short) trail, stopping to catch my breath. I’m so tired when I get home 25 minutes later. This morning I feel a warning stab of pain in my upper back, just like when I had my last infection. I can’t ask my dr or nurse, they’re busy with Covid. Give me some advice.

Oh that is such a problem right now – Just know that you mustn't wait too long to deal with your lungs, the docs would rather see you in clinic than have you go to the ER. And remember, pain is nature's way of telling you to slow down.
When my asthma, bronch and pain flare, I treat myself to one or two days rest, then back off 50% on exercise – also double up on 7% saline nebs. That's exactly where I've been for the past month and I seem to be "holding."
Take care, and check back in with us.
Sue

Liked by lorifilipek, woot

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I think getting the movement in is really important and I feel worse if I miss even one day. But I also think you need to schedule a virtual appointment with your doctor. They may be able to give you an antibiotic to keep you healthy enough to stay out of the hospital.

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Thanks. I know you’re not a doctor and encourage me to see mine, but I’m not sick. The pain is gone, just exhausted. I appreciate your encouragement to get back at it.

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@sueinmn

Oh that is such a problem right now – Just know that you mustn't wait too long to deal with your lungs, the docs would rather see you in clinic than have you go to the ER. And remember, pain is nature's way of telling you to slow down.
When my asthma, bronch and pain flare, I treat myself to one or two days rest, then back off 50% on exercise – also double up on 7% saline nebs. That's exactly where I've been for the past month and I seem to be "holding."
Take care, and check back in with us.
Sue

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Thanks, Sue, for sharing how you handle exercise and flare ups. My pain is gone, I’m not sick, don’t need the dr now. I just needed some help in how to think about exercise and exhaustion. You’ve given me a plan I can use. Consider this your Thanksgiving gift to me.

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@woot

Thanks, Sue, for sharing how you handle exercise and flare ups. My pain is gone, I’m not sick, don’t need the dr now. I just needed some help in how to think about exercise and exhaustion. You’ve given me a plan I can use. Consider this your Thanksgiving gift to me.

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Woot, I admire your expression of appreciation to Beth and Sue. There are some really exemplary people who contribute to this forum. I have certainly benefited from contacts I’ve made here.

And from the top of my lungs, HAPPY THANKSGIVING to all the Mayo Connect folks from down here in THUMPERSVILLE. Don

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Holidays come and go, but some things seem never to change, e.g., here I am ridin’ ole Thumper again this Thanksgiving evening. Don

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@woot – I had another thought about "improving" – sometimes, with a progressive disease, and dare I say it, age, maybe the best idea is to maintain, with tiny increments toward improvement.
I always remember trying to get back in shape too quickly as a runner after childbirth in my 30's – the doctor told me "your body is under stress with 2 small children, recovery and nursing – slow down." Instead of pushing to add 10% per week to my distance, she wanted me to drop to 2% – hard advice for a Type A person, but it was the key – my endurance began to slowly improve without more fatigue or injury.

After MAC, remembering that decades old advice, I started with 1/4 mile daily walks, in 4 months I was up to 1 mile – not much but it got me on track. Today, I begin adding to my post-flare 1 1/2 miles – not by trying to go 2 or 3 miles, just 5 more minutes.
Sue

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@sueinmn

@woot – I had another thought about "improving" – sometimes, with a progressive disease, and dare I say it, age, maybe the best idea is to maintain, with tiny increments toward improvement.
I always remember trying to get back in shape too quickly as a runner after childbirth in my 30's – the doctor told me "your body is under stress with 2 small children, recovery and nursing – slow down." Instead of pushing to add 10% per week to my distance, she wanted me to drop to 2% – hard advice for a Type A person, but it was the key – my endurance began to slowly improve without more fatigue or injury.

After MAC, remembering that decades old advice, I started with 1/4 mile daily walks, in 4 months I was up to 1 mile – not much but it got me on track. Today, I begin adding to my post-flare 1 1/2 miles – not by trying to go 2 or 3 miles, just 5 more minutes.
Sue

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Thanks for your advice

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@sueinmn

@woot – I had another thought about "improving" – sometimes, with a progressive disease, and dare I say it, age, maybe the best idea is to maintain, with tiny increments toward improvement.
I always remember trying to get back in shape too quickly as a runner after childbirth in my 30's – the doctor told me "your body is under stress with 2 small children, recovery and nursing – slow down." Instead of pushing to add 10% per week to my distance, she wanted me to drop to 2% – hard advice for a Type A person, but it was the key – my endurance began to slowly improve without more fatigue or injury.

After MAC, remembering that decades old advice, I started with 1/4 mile daily walks, in 4 months I was up to 1 mile – not much but it got me on track. Today, I begin adding to my post-flare 1 1/2 miles – not by trying to go 2 or 3 miles, just 5 more minutes.
Sue

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I, too, can be an exercise addict. I always hear how important rest days are so I make sure I take 1-2 a week. Is this not true when having Bronchiectasis? Should I make sure I do cardio every day?
I’ve been recently diagnosed. Thank you!

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@cavlover

I, too, can be an exercise addict. I always hear how important rest days are so I make sure I take 1-2 a week. Is this not true when having Bronchiectasis? Should I make sure I do cardio every day?
I’ve been recently diagnosed. Thank you!

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Welcome to Mayo Connect. We are a community of people living with a variety of conditions and challenges, who share our experiences and encourage one another.
I commend you for working to keep your body healthy. Rest days are just as important to us as to anyone else – listen to your body.
So does your name, cavlover, mean you have guinea pigs? My daughter has a herd, and we have one of hers in long-term foster care at our home – he's a lot of fun.
Sue

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Awwww how cute! My name comes from my love of Cavalier King Charles Spaniels. Right now I have two very spoiled rotten ones!
Thank you for the welcome.

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We had guinea pigs for so long and when we came downstairs we mimicked their call. What great conversations.

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I just saw this article on McMaster Optional Aging Portal that I thought was good and also has a few links to other sources that might be helpful.

Modifying exercise to suit your needs: https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/hitting-the-headlines/detail/hitting-the-headlines/2020/12/15/modifying-exercise-to-suit-your-needs

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@johnbishop

I just saw this article on McMaster Optional Aging Portal that I thought was good and also has a few links to other sources that might be helpful.

Modifying exercise to suit your needs: https://www.mcmasteroptimalaging.org/hitting-the-headlines/detail/hitting-the-headlines/2020/12/15/modifying-exercise-to-suit-your-needs

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Hi John – I also watched with great interest. This is the conversation I had with my 30 yo PT this summer. He is quite tuned in to the right exercise for each person, but a little less conscious of suggesting modification. After recovering from ### surgeries with diligent PT and exercise, I had a pretty good feeling for when an exercise he suggested was helping or hurting, leading to changes he actually recorded on his iPad to use with other patients. His specialties are pain management, MFR and osteopathic manipulation, so he sees many patients with multiple challenges.

If we ever get back to the gym, I will also share this with the trainers who teach the Silver Sneakers classes.
Sue

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