Debunking Myths: Can heat kill the coronavirus?

Posted by mikedesi2020 @mikedesi2020, Apr 6 8:13pm

the research tells me that this non living protein is encapsulated with a fatty membrane to protect it once the protection layer melts or is destroyed the protein is NEVER able to activate and spread. I live in Arizona where the temp is now well over 80 IF the virus melts the protection layer of fatty soluble then why IN GOD’S NAME ARE WE AFRAID This should be the end of it here FOR NOW Does anyone have scientific proof of this

@mikedesi2020… I do not think that there's any scientific proof that this virus will "die" in hot weather. So until there is, I hope we all take necessary precaution so it won't get worse.

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I believe the research on Covid-19 is incomplete at this point, but certainly 80F will not inactivate the virus as it multiplies in the body at fevers over 101F. Earlier coronaviruses were reported as being inactivated at temperatures of 130F for extended periods, and 165-170F for shorter times. (WHO report).
Here is some anecdotal evidence for you – in South Texas, the high temperatures last week ranged from 90-100F on most days, but the spread of the virus is accelerating here as elsewhere.
The fatty shell on the virus is, however, the reason handwashing is so effective in helping limit spread. Soap plus friction breaks down the capsule, and water washes away the protein.
I hope this helps your analysis of the current pandemic.
Sue

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@mikedesi2020 While it is true most virus's like this and the Flu are winter type viruses. But there is no evidence that I can find that says Heat will kill this virus yet. I did hear the President mention it and I think we all hope this problem will disappear soon, the advise of the CDC and most experts is to wash hands frequently and the other precautions mentioned. There was a interview that hinted at killing the virus at 136 degrees F, and using a hair dryer to accomplish this but this has been debunked by most experts. Also even if 136 degrees does work that once the virus is in your lungs it will never get that high without killing you also. So I live in Arizona and I'm doing all the recommendations the CDC has stated and Praying for cure to this problem soon.
Have a Blessed Day
Dana

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@danab

@mikedesi2020 While it is true most virus's like this and the Flu are winter type viruses. But there is no evidence that I can find that says Heat will kill this virus yet. I did hear the President mention it and I think we all hope this problem will disappear soon, the advise of the CDC and most experts is to wash hands frequently and the other precautions mentioned. There was a interview that hinted at killing the virus at 136 degrees F, and using a hair dryer to accomplish this but this has been debunked by most experts. Also even if 136 degrees does work that once the virus is in your lungs it will never get that high without killing you also. So I live in Arizona and I'm doing all the recommendations the CDC has stated and Praying for cure to this problem soon.
Have a Blessed Day
Dana

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Dana, I agree wholeheartedly with what you and sue posted. I live in a hot, arid area of TX and while we can all be hopeful that summer heat will slow down the spread, if more people start mingling because of the added sunlight and heat which is already happening now in NYC, the virus spread will continue. The one thing each of us can do is ff the rec's to shelter in place as much as humanly possible.

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@mikedesi2020– Mike, good morning. You have asked a great question- what is "alive"? There is often a fine line between life and non-living in many things. Something can be "not alive," but cause a lot of damage by depending on a live host to do its work, such as this virus.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-viruses-alive-2004/
Please keep this in mind, this virus leads to the death of a lot of people. The death process is horrible. People literally suffocate as their bodies are deprived of air. And it's extremely contagious. The so-called "panic" is the fear of dying this way. Plain and simple.
Here's a short quote from this article: "Viruses, however, parasitize essentially all biomolecular aspects of life. That is, they depend on the host cell for the raw materials and energy necessary for nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, processing and transport, and all other biochemical activities that allow the virus to multiply and spread. One might then conclude that even though these processes come under viral direction, viruses are simply nonliving parasites of living metabolic systems. But a spectrum may exist between what is certainly alive and what is not."

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Debunking COVID-19 myths published by the World Health Organization: https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters

"Exposing yourself to the sun or to temperatures higher than 77F (25C) degrees DOES NOT prevent the coronavirus disease (COVID-19)
You can catch COVID-19, no matter how sunny or hot the weather is. Countries with hot weather have reported cases of COVID-19. To protect yourself, make sure you clean your hands frequently and thoroughly and avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose."

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What Colleen said is so true and also I would like to add social distancing is important , stay home if you dont have to go out DONT I also wear a facial mask and have seen some gorgeous ones from home sewers. I treat this virus like I do any flu or cold it is airborne so protect yourself. Wash hands use lotion so they dont crack open ,dont touch you face, social distancing and wear a mask when you go out .

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@sueinmn

I believe the research on Covid-19 is incomplete at this point, but certainly 80F will not inactivate the virus as it multiplies in the body at fevers over 101F. Earlier coronaviruses were reported as being inactivated at temperatures of 130F for extended periods, and 165-170F for shorter times. (WHO report).
Here is some anecdotal evidence for you – in South Texas, the high temperatures last week ranged from 90-100F on most days, but the spread of the virus is accelerating here as elsewhere.
The fatty shell on the virus is, however, the reason handwashing is so effective in helping limit spread. Soap plus friction breaks down the capsule, and water washes away the protein.
I hope this helps your analysis of the current pandemic.
Sue

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I wonder why so many people with MAC are so smart, intelligent. Thank you Sue for all of us. Flib

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Living in an apartment complex where I have now learned that some here have the attitude of I am old and I am going to continue living my life to the fullest. They don't care about others and go hither thither and yon enjoying going to stores because it is easier to shop.
I will not elaborate further other than to say these type of people are selfish and no better than cold blooded murders!!!!

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@merpreb

@mikedesi2020– Mike, good morning. You have asked a great question- what is "alive"? There is often a fine line between life and non-living in many things. Something can be "not alive," but cause a lot of damage by depending on a live host to do its work, such as this virus.
https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/are-viruses-alive-2004/
Please keep this in mind, this virus leads to the death of a lot of people. The death process is horrible. People literally suffocate as their bodies are deprived of air. And it's extremely contagious. The so-called "panic" is the fear of dying this way. Plain and simple.
Here's a short quote from this article: "Viruses, however, parasitize essentially all biomolecular aspects of life. That is, they depend on the host cell for the raw materials and energy necessary for nucleic acid synthesis, protein synthesis, processing and transport, and all other biochemical activities that allow the virus to multiply and spread. One might then conclude that even though these processes come under viral direction, viruses are simply nonliving parasites of living metabolic systems. But a spectrum may exist between what is certainly alive and what is not."

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@merpreb, Hi there. Funny you should bring this up about viruses. I did a term paper in college about viruses and I questioned the category of viruses being a non-living thing. I disagreed that it is non-living just because it has RND vs DNA. My hypothesis was If it needs a host to survive; wouldn't that make it a living thing? It reproduces itself; wouldn't that be a living thing? It can morph and change to up the odds of survival; doesn't that sound like a living thing? I still believe they are living things, but on a different spectrum. I'd like to see a rock to all those things a virus does! LOL! My post here is for entertainment only, and perhaps a little brain tickling also. Stay safe!!

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@windwalker– Hi. Ok, just for fun. In order for there to be life, there have to be certain criteria. COVID-19 doesn't have all of them. i.e. It can't self-propel. Glad that you brought this up. I'm not a virologist nor do I have a science background so right now, until I learn more this is what I know! 🙂

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I think you're right that hot weather is going to stop the virus in summer. But it will stay alive in the southern hemisphere and come back in the fall. That's what happened in the 1918 pandemic.

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Please, let's check the facts before we post; Mayo Connect is meant to be a source of sound science based information. Hot weather does not stop this virus. This is not supported by science or evidence, and is on the CDC list of Covid-19 myths – https://www.who.int/emergencies/diseases/novel-coronavirus-2019/advice-for-public/myth-busters
Our local daily temps are in the 90's with high humidity, and the number of infected people is increasing every day. It is hot in Ecuador now, and conditions there are terrible as well. At best, as people are outdoors more, and less in confined spaces, they may not spread the virus at the same rate as has happened up until now, but even that is not yet proven.
So far we know social distancing, good handwashing, keeping hands away from the face, and isolation if Covid-19 is known or suspected all help slow the spread. Now there is theory that adding a mask, to inhibit the spread of potentially infected respiratory droplets may also reduce transmission. There is some science behind this, and the jury is still out on effectiveness population-wide, but it is doable, affordable, and a sign to encourage all the other safety efforts.
Sue

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