My spouse tested positive, now what?

Posted by tari4me @tari4me, Dec 6, 2020

My Spouse was not feeling well we went to urgent care and she got tested for covid friday night .Test result came in this morning Sunday she is positive .
She has cold like symptoms coughing no fever and congested we are checking oxygen level it is good right now 95 .I have had headaches but no other symptoms i went and got tested to this morning will not know the results for four days i have no idea what to do about our living arangements . We have been sleeping together and sharing meals .I will be sleeping in the extra bedroom from here out untill we both test negative or 14 days have past since her test I have a construction job do i wait for test to come back or do i go and social distance from everyone

Hello @tari4me and welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I understand your spouse has tested positive and you are waiting for your results. In the meantime, you are concerned with what to do with your living situation as well as what to do while you wait for your test confirmation.

Each state has different guidelines so would encourage you to consult your particular state recommendations and follow the recommendations shared with you upon your testing. I am in MN and the Minnesota Department of Health has the following decision tree that we are to use:

– MN Department of Health COVID-19 Decision Tree for People in Schools, Youth, and Child Care Programs
https://www.health.state.mn.us/diseases/coronavirus/schools/exguide.pdf
When you have a test done and are waiting for results, the general recommendation is that you remain at home in quarantine until your results are in so as not to potentially spread it to others if you do end up testing positive. In addition, since you've been exposed to a known positive case, it is generally recommended you remain at home in quarantine for 7-14 days (depending on state guidelines) from the last time you were with the infected person.

Have you notified your employer of your close contact with your spouse testing positive?

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@tari4me, My husband had mild cough, no fever, and got tested, just in case. 3 days later he got the positive results and he decided to retest because he was not confident of the way the first test was handled. I am a transplant recipient and immunocompromised. I got my test right after he got his positive results and I waited 2 days to get my negative results.
Our local health department was in contact with us, asked who he had contact with, and monitored us. They called daily. I had to quarantine for 14 days after his positive result. He had to isolate (separate bedroom, bathroom, avoiding common areas,masking if we were in same area of house, and wiping down every surface. Our home has a lower level, and he stayed downstairs, except for going to the dining room for a meal that I had prepared for him. I did not let him in "my" safe kitchen! I lived on the upper level.
He was cleared from isolation on day 10 after his symptoms appeared, but had to quarantine (stay home) until I was unquarantined.
We were quarantined over the Thanksgiving week, and feel fortunate that we are both back to normal now.
The CDC has recently changed the guidelines for quarantine, so check with your state and/or local health department for the current policy where you live. Your employer needs to know.
I hope you are negative, nd that your wife has an easy case, as did my husband.

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Hi again, @tari4me . I forgot to mention to you that I have updated the title of your post to allow for members with similar experiences, now and in the future, to better connect and share.

Have you disclosed your close contact situation with your employer and found the resources you need ahead of your work week?

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@rosemarya

@tari4me, My husband had mild cough, no fever, and got tested, just in case. 3 days later he got the positive results and he decided to retest because he was not confident of the way the first test was handled. I am a transplant recipient and immunocompromised. I got my test right after he got his positive results and I waited 2 days to get my negative results.
Our local health department was in contact with us, asked who he had contact with, and monitored us. They called daily. I had to quarantine for 14 days after his positive result. He had to isolate (separate bedroom, bathroom, avoiding common areas,masking if we were in same area of house, and wiping down every surface. Our home has a lower level, and he stayed downstairs, except for going to the dining room for a meal that I had prepared for him. I did not let him in "my" safe kitchen! I lived on the upper level.
He was cleared from isolation on day 10 after his symptoms appeared, but had to quarantine (stay home) until I was unquarantined.
We were quarantined over the Thanksgiving week, and feel fortunate that we are both back to normal now.
The CDC has recently changed the guidelines for quarantine, so check with your state and/or local health department for the current policy where you live. Your employer needs to know.
I hope you are negative, nd that your wife has an easy case, as did my husband.

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@rosemarya, While I regret you and your husband had to quarantine over the holiday, I am so glad you are both back to normal now! I also appreciate what you shared about the precautions you took while being quarantined at home together.

Our little 10 yr old tested positive for Covid in the summer and like you, his brother and parents tested twice and both times had a negative result. They also have a bedroom/bath on the basement floor and the family practiced the same precautions as you. Thankfully, his case was mild but I think the precautions taken by the rest of the family may have well prevented the others getting the virus. His mom took his meals to him and spent some time with him downstairs but I salute both you and my little family for taking the safety measures you took!

REPLY

@tari4me– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. You must be worried sick about your spouse. I have just had a test done for symptoms and I am also married.
I have a couple of days left to wait. It was a self-test. The CDC has advice on how you can handle this situation. I'm sure that there are many, many people who have been in your situation.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/care-for-someone.html
If you test positive do you have people to help care for you?

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@merpreb

@tari4me– Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. You must be worried sick about your spouse. I have just had a test done for symptoms and I am also married.
I have a couple of days left to wait. It was a self-test. The CDC has advice on how you can handle this situation. I'm sure that there are many, many people who have been in your situation.
https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/if-you-are-sick/care-for-someone.html
If you test positive do you have people to help care for you?

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@merpreb You asked “do you have people to help care for you”. I’ve been worrying about all my single friends in the neighborhood. Can they prepare ahead of time, just in case? I’ve been thinking about a ‘COVID kit’ that might be good to have on hand. Like good cough medicine, Tylenol, a pulse oximeter, a thermometer, etc.
What else would anyone suggest?

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@becsbuddy

@merpreb You asked “do you have people to help care for you”. I’ve been worrying about all my single friends in the neighborhood. Can they prepare ahead of time, just in case? I’ve been thinking about a ‘COVID kit’ that might be good to have on hand. Like good cough medicine, Tylenol, a pulse oximeter, a thermometer, etc.
What else would anyone suggest?

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@becsbuddy Hi Becky,

A COVID kit is a great idea! As a matter of fact, my internist suggested that when I last saw her. She suggested the same items you mentioned and added the blood pressure monitor to those on your list. I have them all in my night stand, so I'm ready. She said that she has had patients come into her office with very low oxygen levels that didn't even realize they are sick. She suggested using the pulse oximeter and the thermometer on a daily basis.

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@becsbuddy

@merpreb You asked “do you have people to help care for you”. I’ve been worrying about all my single friends in the neighborhood. Can they prepare ahead of time, just in case? I’ve been thinking about a ‘COVID kit’ that might be good to have on hand. Like good cough medicine, Tylenol, a pulse oximeter, a thermometer, etc.
What else would anyone suggest?

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Morning @becsbuddy– You hit the nail on the head with this suggestion! Preparing ahead of time is, of course, more than a kit. Essentials are masks, good 60% alcohol wipes, gloves, and plenty of TP and water if need be. Pulse oximeters, thermometers, and maybe a BP cuff. I hesitate about the BP cuff. They are expensive and many people don't understand the read-outs or how to use them. Also, I'm sure that all of our BP's are higher because of all the stress surrounding COVID-19 and anticipating vaccines.

Wearing masks, washing hands, and maintaining safe distances – These are the most important basics. Even after we are inoculated these will be even more important until most people are vaccinated.

About thermometers: Do you know what your normal temperature is? Most people don't. Mine is low so I feel if mine goes to 99 and above. I am pretty sick with a fever of 100+.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/07/health/normal-body-temperature-covid-wellness/index.html
Here is a very, very long list of what could be in a kit:
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/firstaid-kit
I need to update ours. Thanks for the reminder!

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@becsbuddy

@merpreb You asked “do you have people to help care for you”. I’ve been worrying about all my single friends in the neighborhood. Can they prepare ahead of time, just in case? I’ve been thinking about a ‘COVID kit’ that might be good to have on hand. Like good cough medicine, Tylenol, a pulse oximeter, a thermometer, etc.
What else would anyone suggest?

Jump to this post

I would add some easy foods to the list, which require little or no prep. Some examples – low-sodium broth & soup, individual serving containers of fruits, applesauce & pudding, Gatorade or Pedialyte, ginger or peppermint tea, instant oatmeal or other cereal, pot pies or other frozen meals. I also keep a box or two of shelf-stable milk in case I can't get to the store, and a loaf of bread in the freezer for toast.

Also have the number of a pharmacy that delivers handy in case any meds need to be ordered for you (maybe more pricy, but necessary if you are really feeling bad.)
Sue

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@merpreb

Morning @becsbuddy– You hit the nail on the head with this suggestion! Preparing ahead of time is, of course, more than a kit. Essentials are masks, good 60% alcohol wipes, gloves, and plenty of TP and water if need be. Pulse oximeters, thermometers, and maybe a BP cuff. I hesitate about the BP cuff. They are expensive and many people don't understand the read-outs or how to use them. Also, I'm sure that all of our BP's are higher because of all the stress surrounding COVID-19 and anticipating vaccines.

Wearing masks, washing hands, and maintaining safe distances – These are the most important basics. Even after we are inoculated these will be even more important until most people are vaccinated.

About thermometers: Do you know what your normal temperature is? Most people don't. Mine is low so I feel if mine goes to 99 and above. I am pretty sick with a fever of 100+.
https://www.cnn.com/2020/12/07/health/normal-body-temperature-covid-wellness/index.html
Here is a very, very long list of what could be in a kit:
https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/wellness-and-prevention/firstaid-kit
I need to update ours. Thanks for the reminder!

Jump to this post

I am well stocked on the "basics" for a Covid kit but also have homemade broths/soups and easy-to-heat foods from the freezer as well as stocking cough drops, probiotics and Gatorade, to ward of dehydration.

Really appreciate the link for determining "normal temp" because I have no clue about that and think it would be well worth establishing. Thank you for both links, @merpreb

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