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cmcclure
@cmcclure

Posts: 15
Joined: Mar 15, 2018

(studies) if ur told this is ubiquitous call BS on "them"

Posted by @cmcclure, Sun, Jun 3 12:00pm

(Im very well educated and im not nice to anyone that just regurgitates what they have read or what they have been told so please be mindful of what you read here. ) I was dam lucky to find this study and other was well so here is just a taste for now. Oxygen is ubiquitous in the air we breath that is y we breath it . Most of these physician just vomit up a quick little statement MACTB bacteria(s) is "ubiquitous" and blah blah blah there is no correlation between infected individuals and add (your own noun, and adverb) ( mine happens to be nurses caring for TB and HIV hospice patients in the prison) read the study because it should anger some such as it has me..It comes down common sense. TB bacterie is not ubiquitous it does have common reservoirs ( infected patients perhaps should be called proxy reservoirs, Maybe) but they are reservoirs none the less. Im looking for studies not the regurgitated studies quoted and given too you by your lazy infectious disease provider. Final thoughts to any providers reading this don't be lazy don't say it is not person to person contracted .. say it is low… Aerosolized water (showering those infected macro-aspiration aka coughing, and those on ventalors. ) dont say it is ubiquitous bc that is false. Be smart providers tell you patients family out breaks are common thats just being honest. ( I do respect all BUT I am honestly pissed about the rigidity I have experienced and maybe not purposely done but the untruthfulness of what i have been reading by those that have a platform to speak up)

REPLY

Topic:The Recovery of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulareComplex (MAC) from the Residential Bathrooms of Patients with Pulmonary MAC 

ABSTRACT:The distribution of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) in residences was examined. MAC was only recovered from bathrooms but not from other sites of residences. The appearance ratio in the bathrooms of patients with pulmonary MAC was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers' bathrooms (P = .01).

The Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) is an opportunistic pathogen. However, MAC occasionally causes a progressive lung disease, leading to death, even in patients without a history of lung diseases or immunodeficiency [1]. MAC is widely distributed in rivers, soil, birds, farm animals, public pools, hot tubs, and hot water supplies [2]. In the absence of proof of person-to-person spread of MAC, it is now generally accepted that environmental sources are the reservoir for most human infections caused by MAC [1, 2]. The number of cases of pulmonary MAC disease has been increasing in many countries, especially in advanced countries rather than in developing countries [2]. O'Brien et al. [3] hypothesized that the increased prevalence of MAC lung disease relates to the change in our hygiene habits from bathing to showering. However, the distributions of MAC in individual residences have not been examined. Therefore, we investigated the distribution of MAC in residences to assess the hypothesis of O'Brien and colleagues. Furthermore, we compared the recovery ratio between patients' and healthy volunteers' houses. We also compared the isolates recovered from patients' houses with those from their respective sputum samples using restriction fragment—length polymorphism and PFGE.

Huh?

Have you found studies related to people who use well water vs city water supplies?

@cmcclure

Topic:The Recovery of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulareComplex (MAC) from the Residential Bathrooms of Patients with Pulmonary MAC 

ABSTRACT:The distribution of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) in residences was examined. MAC was only recovered from bathrooms but not from other sites of residences. The appearance ratio in the bathrooms of patients with pulmonary MAC was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers' bathrooms (P = .01).

The Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) is an opportunistic pathogen. However, MAC occasionally causes a progressive lung disease, leading to death, even in patients without a history of lung diseases or immunodeficiency [1]. MAC is widely distributed in rivers, soil, birds, farm animals, public pools, hot tubs, and hot water supplies [2]. In the absence of proof of person-to-person spread of MAC, it is now generally accepted that environmental sources are the reservoir for most human infections caused by MAC [1, 2]. The number of cases of pulmonary MAC disease has been increasing in many countries, especially in advanced countries rather than in developing countries [2]. O'Brien et al. [3] hypothesized that the increased prevalence of MAC lung disease relates to the change in our hygiene habits from bathing to showering. However, the distributions of MAC in individual residences have not been examined. Therefore, we investigated the distribution of MAC in residences to assess the hypothesis of O'Brien and colleagues. Furthermore, we compared the recovery ratio between patients' and healthy volunteers' houses. We also compared the isolates recovered from patients' houses with those from their respective sputum samples using restriction fragment—length polymorphism and PFGE.

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@cmcclure This is interesting, I'd like to learn more about it. Thank you for posting another viewpoint. I see Colleen has posted the link where you got this from. I will read it. I think I have commented to you in the past that I thought it could possibly be transmitted by an infected person.

@cmcclure

Topic:The Recovery of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulareComplex (MAC) from the Residential Bathrooms of Patients with Pulmonary MAC 

ABSTRACT:The distribution of Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) in residences was examined. MAC was only recovered from bathrooms but not from other sites of residences. The appearance ratio in the bathrooms of patients with pulmonary MAC was significantly higher than that in healthy volunteers' bathrooms (P = .01).

The Mycobacterium avium-intracellulare complex (MAC) is an opportunistic pathogen. However, MAC occasionally causes a progressive lung disease, leading to death, even in patients without a history of lung diseases or immunodeficiency [1]. MAC is widely distributed in rivers, soil, birds, farm animals, public pools, hot tubs, and hot water supplies [2]. In the absence of proof of person-to-person spread of MAC, it is now generally accepted that environmental sources are the reservoir for most human infections caused by MAC [1, 2]. The number of cases of pulmonary MAC disease has been increasing in many countries, especially in advanced countries rather than in developing countries [2]. O'Brien et al. [3] hypothesized that the increased prevalence of MAC lung disease relates to the change in our hygiene habits from bathing to showering. However, the distributions of MAC in individual residences have not been examined. Therefore, we investigated the distribution of MAC in residences to assess the hypothesis of O'Brien and colleagues. Furthermore, we compared the recovery ratio between patients' and healthy volunteers' houses. We also compared the isolates recovered from patients' houses with those from their respective sputum samples using restriction fragment—length polymorphism and PFGE.

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@cmcclure , Here is similar test done here the states.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3166028/

@jkiemen

Have you found studies related to people who use well water vs city water supplies?

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@jkiemen According to microbiologist, Joseph O. Falkinham, III at Va. Tech, well water is usually void of mycobacterium.

Yay… When I was diagnosed I had moved about 3 years prior to a condo with city water. I have since moved and have well water.

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