Stress Management for Cancer: Free online course from Mayo

Mayo Clinic's Cancer Education Center just uploaded a new self-learning course to help people (patients and caregivers) living with cancer to manage stress.

You can work through the modules at your own pace to help you better understand how the body may respond to stressful situations, including cancer. You'll get various tools and techniques to meet physical, emotional, and spiritual needs, as you learn to manage stress.

Go directly to the free online course
– Stress Management for Cancer https://connect.mayoclinic.org/blog/cancer-education-center/tab/stress-management/

Follow the Cancer Education expert blog to be notified when new posts are made. Their blog is a rich source of helpful information, events, online courses and more.
– Cancer Education https://connect.mayoclinic.org/blog/cancer-education-center/

What help you manage stress?

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Cancer: Managing Symptoms group.

@colleenyoung I manage stress by reaching out to and helping others. Meditation, being thankful to be alive each day that I am, arts-and-crafts, also help.

Looking forward to what others have to say!
Ginger

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Hello. I am looking for a Pagets Disease support group or groups. Thank you.

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@oumike

Hello. I am looking for a Pagets Disease support group or groups. Thank you.

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Hi Mike,
If you would like to start a discussion about Paget's Disease in the Cancer group here: https://connect.mayoclinic.org/group/cancer/

I can connect you with other members living with Paget's.

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@gingerw

@colleenyoung I manage stress by reaching out to and helping others. Meditation, being thankful to be alive each day that I am, arts-and-crafts, also help.

Looking forward to what others have to say!
Ginger

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I manage stress by walking, volunteering, reading and watching challenging, but humor laced TV, movies, mysteries. I know this, if I don't WALK I don't sleep or rest well!

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I like to manage stress with tapping – I like to do some tapping each evening before bed and usually in the AM too. Coloring also helps me de-stress and I am trying to add meditation – even thought I don't think I am very good at it – it quickly becomes a 10 minute nap most times 🙂

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@jal333

I manage stress by walking, volunteering, reading and watching challenging, but humor laced TV, movies, mysteries. I know this, if I don't WALK I don't sleep or rest well!

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I love to watch mysteries too! I like the cozy Hallmark style ones – or the "travel" master shows on PBS – Like Death in Paradise. The Mallorca files is my new favorite – they are playing on my local PBS station. Thanks!

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I found this video, produced by Mayo Clinic which shows How Yoga can help you heal after cancer
https://www.mayoclinic.org/connected-care/6-ways-yoga-helps-you-heal-after-cancer/vid-20508758

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@gingerw

@colleenyoung I manage stress by reaching out to and helping others. Meditation, being thankful to be alive each day that I am, arts-and-crafts, also help.

Looking forward to what others have to say!
Ginger

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My experience, in 2001 with NHL + 8 rounds of retuximab + severe nausea , was a cancer group meeting. These fellow fighters were more knowledgeable than chemo nurses and taught me how to deal with the symptoms I was experiencing. I was scared at 1st meeting, but heard a speaker talk about esophagial cancer, a former Opera singer to boot, lost his pipes . The epiphany came from his words, THAT Was 10 Years ago. I held onto those words like a liferaft . I had a 4 year old to protect too.My husband went back in the military 3days before 9/11. He had his mission, I had mine. Blue cross / blue shield had sent a form letter refusing my biopsy. We had them for 11 years, thanks for nothing. But I got green 💚 lights the whole way from Tricare. Much Gratitude.

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@franchronic77

My experience, in 2001 with NHL + 8 rounds of retuximab + severe nausea , was a cancer group meeting. These fellow fighters were more knowledgeable than chemo nurses and taught me how to deal with the symptoms I was experiencing. I was scared at 1st meeting, but heard a speaker talk about esophagial cancer, a former Opera singer to boot, lost his pipes . The epiphany came from his words, THAT Was 10 Years ago. I held onto those words like a liferaft . I had a 4 year old to protect too.My husband went back in the military 3days before 9/11. He had his mission, I had mine. Blue cross / blue shield had sent a form letter refusing my biopsy. We had them for 11 years, thanks for nothing. But I got green 💚 lights the whole way from Tricare. Much Gratitude.

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@franchronic77 Welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect!
I agree with you, that support groups sure can help so much! Prior to the pandemic and moving to another state, my husband and I participated in a monthly face-to-face support group for kidney patients. Now, thankfully, they moved to Zoom, and in fact, have more participation since members come in from all over the globe!

I also do a Zoom meeting once a month from my cancer center, for multiple myeloma patients. The insights that fellow patients can offer, and ask/answer questions right there are invaluable.

This year I am looking forward to doing more journaling, more getting my thoughts out of my head and onto paper.https://connect.mayoclinic.org/discussion/journaling-the-write-stuff-for-you/

How are you doing these days?
Ginger

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