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bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Joined: Dec 09, 2011

sodium deficiencies

Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 9, 2011

there is only 10% of the worlds population that has this rare disorder. i am starting discussion because i am one of those people. if anyone has any tips or concerns on this disorder maybe we may be able to find some solutions to help this disorder to improve. come chat with me i would like to hear all comments and ideas.

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bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 9, 2011

how do you treat your sodium deficiency?


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 10, 2011


Could alcohol abuse cause hyponatremia?Improve
In: Alcoholism, Addictions [Edit categories]
Answers.com > Wiki Answers > Categories > Health > Addictions > Alcoholism > Could alcohol abuse cause hyponatremia? Answer: Improve



Alcohol consumption inhibits the release of a hormone (ADH) that normally causes your body to hang on to the water it needs. Since the hormone is inhibited, your body dumps water (urine). In the body, water and sodium travel together, so with the water, the person is dumping sodium. Additionally, typically alcoholics don’t have the best nutrition so they are not getting the sodium they need in their diet, so that may add fuel to the hyponatremia fire. Hope this helps.



Read more: http://wiki.answers.com/Q/Could_alcohol_abuse_cause_hyponatremia#ixzz1g9Y2Vjkr


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 13, 2011

i still yet need to go to a specialist to fnd out what ty ypnatremia i have. i do knowthat minewas cased by a medicinal couteraction in my system from a psychiatric drug and also possibly toomuch fliud intake. i used to drink alcohl ut have been sober for over 1 year n and i found out i had hypontreia back in february of 2001. i have been strugglingt find ways to boost up my sodium since then. i was in critical shape when i found out i had hyponatremia. my sodium level was down to 124. i lost functions in my fingers and my face was as white as a sheet. my speech was even slurred. my eyes looked distant and also started to roam almost what seemed into different dirrections. my eyes are better now, my speech is still somewhat slurred due to the medication i am on now which is improving daily.my sodium is now up to 132 and slowly climbing. i went to a doctor and we searched out online what type of ways i could boost up my sodium, we searched online for many different sites for low sodium and kept on finding ways to only lower it we found one site that had a list of foods that are high in sodium and i just keep trying to improve my sodium as the days go by. i was quite surprised when i found out i would be able to eat what would kill most people with high blood pressure. the only thing i have to becareful about is to not pack on the pounds as i try to get my sodium back up to the ranges its supposed be which is at 135-146. that is the average normal range as far as i know. do you have any further suggestions on how to highten my sodium? if so would you please share on how you do it so that way we can possibly go on this journey together into good health?


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 13, 2011

if you would like to share your experience at any tme please do so. im always interested in hearing and sharing experience strength and hope.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 26, 2011

Trileptal may lower serum sodium levels (hyponatremia), and symptoms of hyponatremia may develop if
the sodium level is not normalized. The body’s sodium concentration is regulated by the mechanisms of thirst,
hormones (e.g., antidiuretic hormone), and the kidneys. Disturbance of sodium balance can disrupt many of
the body’s physiological functions, with serious clinical consequences. Usually, Trileptal-induced hyponatremia
is mild and produces no symptoms (asymptomatic), but in clinically significant hyponatremia, symptoms
may include loss of appetite, nausea and vomiting, confusion, lethargy, headache, and agitation. Individuals
who are also receiving medications known to decrease serum sodium levels (e.g., thiazide diuretics) or those
with a medical condition that disrupts sodium balance may be particularly susceptible to hyponatremia during
treatment with Trileptal. The serum sodium levels of patients who are taking Trileptal should be monitored
routinely, especially during the first 3 months of treatment, when hyponatremia generally occurs.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Dec 26, 2011

The sympto ms of hyponatremia or wat er intoxicat ion when plasma sodium fall s
below 120 millieq uivalent per lit er (meq/ I) inclu de: dizziness, headach e, lethargy,
mental confus ion, mental slowing, weak ness, loss of apatit e, and hosti lit y. Neu rologica
l ab normalit ies, stupor, convulsions, a nd coma, domina te as th e sodium level fall s
below 110 meq /I


bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 12, 2012

The body obtains sodium through food and drink and loses it primarily in sweat and urine.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 12, 2012

Syndrome of Inappropriate Secretion of Antidiuretic Hormone

Syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH) develops when too much antidiuretic hormone is released by the pituitary gland, causing the body to retain fluid and lower the sodium level by dilution
Pain, stress, exercise, a low blood sugar level, and certain disorders of the heart, thyroid gland, kidneys, or adrenal glands can stimulate the release of antidiuretic hormone from the pituitary gland, as can the following drugs:

ChlorpropamideSome Trade Names
DIABINESE
(which lowers the blood sugar level)
CarbamazepineSome Trade Names
TEGRETOL
(an anticonvulsant)
Vincristine (a chemotherapy drug)
Clofibrate (which lowers cholesterol levels)
Antipsychotic drugs
AspirinSome Trade Names
BAYER
, ibuprofenSome Trade Names
ADVIL MOTRIN
, and many other nonprescription pain relievers (analgesics)
Vasopressin (synthetic antidiuretic hormone) and oxytocinSome Trade Names
PITOCIN
(both drugs help the body conserve fluids


bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 16, 2012


Hyponatremia, or low salt content in the blood, can be a serious medical problem. Salt is an important electrolyte that regulates water balance in the body. A low salt content in the blood typically means that there is too much fluid in the bloodstream, which can be placing stress on the heart and other organs. Therefore, you must adhere to the diet for hyponatremia that your physician recommends to bring your salt levels to the normal range.



Read more: http://www.livestrong.com/article/416857-diet-for-hyponatremia/#ixzz1jdXphPZl


bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 16, 2012

Can You Really Drink Too Much Water?

In a word, yes. Drinking too much water can lead to a condition known as water intoxication and to a related problem resulting from the dilution of sodium in the body, hyponatremia. Water intoxication is most commonly seen in infants under six months of age and sometimes in athletes. A baby can get water intoxication as a result of drinking several bottles of water a day or from drinking infant formula that has been diluted too much. Athletes can also suffer from water intoxication. Athletes sweat heavily, losing both water and electrolytes. Water intoxication and hyponatremia result when a dehydrated person drinks too much water without the accompanying electrolytes.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 16, 2012

What Happens During Water Intoxication?

When too much water enters the body’s cells, the tissues swell with the excess fluid. Your cells maintain a specific concentration gradient, so excess water outside the cells (the serum) draws sodium from within the cells out into the serum in an attempt to re-establish the necessary concentration. As more water accumulates, the serum sodium concentration drops — a condition known as hyponatremia. The other way cells try to regain the electrolyte balance is for water outside the cells to rush into the cells via osmosis. The movement of water across a semipermeable membrane from higher to lower concentration is called osmosis. Although electrolytes are more concentrated inside the cells than outside, the water outside the cells is ‘more concentrated’ or ‘less dilute’ since it contains fewer electrolytes. Both electrolytes and water move across the cell membrane in an effort to balance concentration. Theoretically, cells could swell to the point of bursting.

From the cell’s point of view, water intoxication produces the same effects as would result from drowning in fresh water. Electrolyte imbalance and tissue swelling can cause an irregular heartbeat, allow fluid to enter the lungs, and may cause fluttering eyelids. Swelling puts pressure on the brain and nerves, which can cause behaviors resembling alcohol intoxication. Swelling of brain tissues can cause seizures, coma and ultimately death unless water intake is restricted and a hypertonic saline (salt) solution is administered. If treatment is given before tissue swelling causes too much cellular damage, then a complete recovery can be expected within a few days.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 16, 2012

It’s Not How Much You Drink, It’s How Fast You Drink It!

The kidneys of a healthy adult can process fifteen liters of water a day! You are unlikely to suffer from water intoxication, even if you drink a lot of water, as long as you drink over time as opposed to intaking an enormous volume at one time. As a general guideline, most adults need about three quarts of fluid each day. Much of that water comes from food, so 8-12 eight ounce glasses a day is a common recommended intake. You may need more water if the weather is very warm or very dry, if you are exercising, or if you are taking certain medications. The bottom line is this: it’s possible to drink too much water, but unless you are running a marathon or an infant, water intoxication is a very uncommon condition.


bonnieh
@bonnieh

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Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 17, 2012

Where did people get the idea that guzzling enormous quantities of water is healthful? A few years ago Heinz Valtin, a kidney specialist from Dartmouth Medical School, decided to determine if the common advice to drink eight, eight-ounce glasses of water per day could hold up to scientific scrutiny. After scouring the peer-reviewed literature, Valtin concluded that no scientific studies support the “eight x eight” dictum (for healthy adults living in temperate climates and doing mild exercise). In fact, drinking this much or more “could be harmful, both in precipitating potentially dangerous hyponatremia and exposure to pollutants, and also in making many people feel guilty for not drinking enough,” he wrote in his 2002 review for the American Journal of Physiology—Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology. And since he published his findings, Valtin says, “not a single scientific report published in a peer-reviewed publication has proven the contrary.”


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 17, 2012

To guard against hyponatremia you must balance your fluid intake with a well-balanced nutritional plan and indulge in less alcohol, soda, coffee and tea. Never substitute the above drinks for good clean water, fresh fruits or vegetables. Pay attention to thirst signals and establish definitive daily intakes


bonnieh
@bonnieh

Posts: 129
Joined: Dec 09, 2011
Posted by @bonnieh, Jan 17, 2012


Low Sodium Levels
A variety of factors can cause low sodium levels. Water intoxication is one such cause. This occurs when someone consumes too much water, causing an unsafe drop in electrolytes. Too much caffeine has been linked to some cases of hyponatremia. Certain diseases can also cause low sodium levels. If your sodium levels are only slightly below normal or are gradually declining, you may not experience any symptoms. Significant drops in blood sodium levels can cause disorientation, confusion or even coma. A blood test is required to determine your sodium levels.

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