Social Anxiety Disorder and How to Cope or Stop It

Posted by Nay313 @nay313, Sep 28, 2012

Hello Everyone, I am currently suffering from social anxiety disorder, it bothers me from day to day and I don’t know how or when it started. I’m always worried about how people view me and what they may think of me. I don’t talk to many people and its not that i don’t want to but I worry about saying something wrong or doing something stupid and nowadays if you don’t look like you know what your saying people would bash you and hurt your feelings in the most painful way, I don’t really go out as much unless i’m with my identical twin and some of our friends and even that kind of gets me anxious. Sometimes I hide these feelings because i don’t want people to know but really it affects me everday. I hate that it affect my thinking and even how i view myself, relationship with my family and friends. I worry if this would be something I’ll deal with for the rest of my life and these same reoccurring feelings will come back. Have anybody suffer this, and know how to cope or stop it?

@annheaney

Yes, I have social anxiety and tend to run away from authority figures. When I really like someone I get self critical. My therapist and I are working on other things. When I have things settled then I will address social anxiety. I am afraid to answer the phone, for example. Some of this is biochemical and some has environmental factors. Just imagine. You would not treat a friend as bad as you treat yourself. ‘that part has been covered between my therapist and me. Like you I have a lot to work on. And it is not our fault. As to whether it will last the rest of our lives I do not know. If I were you I would tell your mental health professionals what I have told you. Maybe you need more medicine and/or therapy. I have the right medicine and need therapy every 2 or 3 weeks. Con-
sider what I have told you.

Jump to this post

Hi Mary Ann I am okay have started back at work in residential care working in a nursing home and enjoying the work very much, but finding it physically wearing. How are you/ You are on my friends list and can talk to me anytime Lovely to hear from you take care Annie

REPLY

For the people who want them –psychotropics drugs aree OK…but I would try ALL other avenues first..because what usually happens is: you start getting obsessed about the drugs!…in one way or another. I would try hypnotherapy…or perhaps joing a support group…I have a friend and the group helped her tremendously. Good luck!

REPLY
@bettyann

For the people who want them –psychotropics drugs aree OK…but I would try ALL other avenues first..because what usually happens is: you start getting obsessed about the drugs!…in one way or another. I would try hypnotherapy…or perhaps joing a support group…I have a friend and the group helped her tremendously. Good luck!

Jump to this post

Hi I also suffer same I have been helped greatly with psychotherapy and meds I still get attacks if I am driving and I don’t know where the destination is even with a gos. Chey

REPLY
@lain59

I take Ativan which helps a bit but now I am trying Mindfulness, a Zen like approach. Let it flow through you like current and dissipate. Life is absurd. People are absurd in their constrictive tiny boxes. Life moves on. What matter what they think? To agonize over social mistakes, will it matter? No. I don’t think so. You sound like a real person to me. Real. That is what matters. People behind their social masks hidden in their snug little worlds are sad. Be free and be whoever you wish. Life is learning. We learn from our successes but tend to ignore them instead, blowing up painful mistakes.

Jump to this post

I like that meditation can be so elating the body and mind are so intertwined when one is out of balance so is the other. Chey

REPLY
@bettyann

For the people who want them –psychotropics drugs aree OK…but I would try ALL other avenues first..because what usually happens is: you start getting obsessed about the drugs!…in one way or another. I would try hypnotherapy…or perhaps joing a support group…I have a friend and the group helped her tremendously. Good luck!

Jump to this post

I too agee with Betty to try different avenues. Group interaction can be very benefical. to many people. It maybe well worth a try. Take care

REPLY
@bettyann

For the people who want them –psychotropics drugs aree OK…but I would try ALL other avenues first..because what usually happens is: you start getting obsessed about the drugs!…in one way or another. I would try hypnotherapy…or perhaps joing a support group…I have a friend and the group helped her tremendously. Good luck!

Jump to this post

You need to talk to your psychiatrist about this. The chemicals in your brain de-
termine how you think. It is up to both you and your doctor to know your symptoms . Then the psychiatrist determines whether there is a chemical imbalance in your brain. Ask your doctor whether you need psychotropic drugs. Not taking drugs when you need them is dangerous. Let your doctor lead.

REPLY

I believe the best way is to talk about it and face it. Learn to improve yourself. Accept your errors. Tell yourself it is okay to make mistakes. Don’t criticize yourself. Move forward. Believe in yourself. Be confident.

REPLY

I also suffer from social anxiety. I’ve spent most of my life trying to will it away, calling myself a perfectionist, and doing my best to hide the signs of nervousness. It became unbearable during law school, and i started taking Fluoxetine. It helped a lot to reduce the constant fear and “take the edge off.” I no longer was overcome with dread at the prospect of going to class or a cocktaill party.

The chemical tweak from the Fluoxetine was only maybe half the battle though. I still disliked that I didn’t enjoy social activities like everyone else seems to. I still looked at that as though it was a problem or abnormality–something that I wish I could fix. I’ve now figured out that refusing to accept that aspect of myself actually compounded the problem. I was already my own biggest critic in every other aspect of life. It really was unfair of me to also beat myself up for my highly attuned sensitivity to others.

I read an article in Time Magazine about a year ago that changed that entirely. It was an article about “the introvert,” that basically sang the praises of the introvert. Honestly, it was like my life, thoughts, emotions, interests, and everything else started making sense. I’ve read some of the books cited in that article now and it’s been life-changing. It’s changed my whole perspective and helped me understand my needs. And best of all, I don’t treat my love for solitude and discomfort of big social life as a disease that should be fixed. One of the books was called Quiet – The Introvert in a World that Can’t Stop Talking (or something close to that).

REPLY
Please sign in or register to post a reply.