PTSD and a film for our veterans: Thank You For Your Service

 “Thank You For Your Service” tackles the perception of the mental health crisis in our military and the stigma that veterans face around receiving mental health treatment and support. The film champions the need for a systematic change in national policy that will help save the lives of thousands of veterans when they return home. The film’s trailer can be seen here:

. When you have an opportunity to view the trailer or the entire film, let’s have a discussion about it.

Teresa, thank you for posting the link to the movie trailer on YouTube. I had seen the movie trailer before and to be honest it brought up some sad memories of friends I had who had served in the Vietnam war and were affected by PTSD before we knew what it was doing to veterans. I think the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have brought PTSD out into the open but I don’t feel we as a country deal with it and provide the help needed to the returning veterans. The VA is a mess (IMHO) and it’s only through groups like Franklin Graham & Samaritan’s Purse Heal Our Patriots (http://sampur.se/2hfym00) and a few other groups that I’ve seen Gary Sinise is also involved with that are making a difference. I am hoping the movie will be well attended and help shine the light world wide on this growing problem.

God Bless!
John

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@johnbishop

Teresa, thank you for posting the link to the movie trailer on YouTube. I had seen the movie trailer before and to be honest it brought up some sad memories of friends I had who had served in the Vietnam war and were affected by PTSD before we knew what it was doing to veterans. I think the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have brought PTSD out into the open but I don’t feel we as a country deal with it and provide the help needed to the returning veterans. The VA is a mess (IMHO) and it’s only through groups like Franklin Graham & Samaritan’s Purse Heal Our Patriots (http://sampur.se/2hfym00) and a few other groups that I’ve seen Gary Sinise is also involved with that are making a difference. I am hoping the movie will be well attended and help shine the light world wide on this growing problem.

God Bless!
John

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@johnbishop Thanks for sharing your opinion, John. I believe there is a link to the entire film. Have you watched it yet?

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@johnbishop

Teresa, thank you for posting the link to the movie trailer on YouTube. I had seen the movie trailer before and to be honest it brought up some sad memories of friends I had who had served in the Vietnam war and were affected by PTSD before we knew what it was doing to veterans. I think the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have brought PTSD out into the open but I don’t feel we as a country deal with it and provide the help needed to the returning veterans. The VA is a mess (IMHO) and it’s only through groups like Franklin Graham & Samaritan’s Purse Heal Our Patriots (http://sampur.se/2hfym00) and a few other groups that I’ve seen Gary Sinise is also involved with that are making a difference. I am hoping the movie will be well attended and help shine the light world wide on this growing problem.

God Bless!
John

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I don’t think the full version is available until Oct 2017? There have been screenings in certain locations where there has been someone who sponsored or bought enough tickets to bring it to a location/city – http://www.thankyouforyourservicethefilm.com/. Reviews by people who have seen it say it is a very powerful film.

John

REPLY
@johnbishop

Teresa, thank you for posting the link to the movie trailer on YouTube. I had seen the movie trailer before and to be honest it brought up some sad memories of friends I had who had served in the Vietnam war and were affected by PTSD before we knew what it was doing to veterans. I think the Iraq and Afghanistan wars have brought PTSD out into the open but I don’t feel we as a country deal with it and provide the help needed to the returning veterans. The VA is a mess (IMHO) and it’s only through groups like Franklin Graham & Samaritan’s Purse Heal Our Patriots (http://sampur.se/2hfym00) and a few other groups that I’ve seen Gary Sinise is also involved with that are making a difference. I am hoping the movie will be well attended and help shine the light world wide on this growing problem.

God Bless!
John

Jump to this post

@johnbishop Perhaps you are right. I heard about the film because there was a showing in Lansing, Michigan and the reviews were wonderful. I’ll have to check You Tube to sure of that, though.

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@hopeful33250
My husband is a Vietnam veteran. I agree with @johnbishop that more must be done to help veterans deal with this problem.

I am baffled by the VA’s screening or pre-screening for PTSD – three questions from the nurse before each check-up, only two of which I can remember at this time, about whether the veteran saw things that bothered him or made him feel sad, and whether he has nightmares about things he saw or things that happened. If the veteran is a person who holds back, and/or would never admit such things, or if the person already has dementia, these questions are ineffectual. And when I try to help him during these questions, by reminding him that he told me, over the years, about some things that bothered him, or when I tell the nurse about the nightmares, it is just ignored, and he rarely remembers what he has dreamed anyway. Or when I tell the GP or the neurologist about how he jumps and cringes at any sudden and/or loud noise, they just pass it off. One told me that PTSD can be caused by any number of events in life. Well, yes it can, or maybe it was Vietnam. This is all so frustrating. My husband is a person who just won’t complain about much, and now, having dementia has exacerbated the situation. There has to be better screening for this.

Macbeth

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@macbeth

@hopeful33250
My husband is a Vietnam veteran. I agree with @johnbishop that more must be done to help veterans deal with this problem.

I am baffled by the VA’s screening or pre-screening for PTSD – three questions from the nurse before each check-up, only two of which I can remember at this time, about whether the veteran saw things that bothered him or made him feel sad, and whether he has nightmares about things he saw or things that happened. If the veteran is a person who holds back, and/or would never admit such things, or if the person already has dementia, these questions are ineffectual. And when I try to help him during these questions, by reminding him that he told me, over the years, about some things that bothered him, or when I tell the nurse about the nightmares, it is just ignored, and he rarely remembers what he has dreamed anyway. Or when I tell the GP or the neurologist about how he jumps and cringes at any sudden and/or loud noise, they just pass it off. One told me that PTSD can be caused by any number of events in life. Well, yes it can, or maybe it was Vietnam. This is all so frustrating. My husband is a person who just won’t complain about much, and now, having dementia has exacerbated the situation. There has to be better screening for this.

Macbeth

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@macbeth Thanks for adding comments regarding this. Have you looked at the trailer for “Thanks for Your Service?” I would like to hear your opinion.

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@hopeful33250
I did see it. Yes, I hate to say it, but I feel a pang these days when I hear someone say “Thanks for your service.” Not that all vets do not deserve our respect. They certainly do. It’s because of the situation with all of the problems they suffer in relation to their service.

O.K. My feeling is that, when someone drops everything else in their life – everything — and answer the call, the government owes them. Period. My husband was drafted. He wasn’t hung ho to go, but he just thought he wasn’t any better than the next guy down the line at American Motorrs, or on the next farm down the road. He went. He did as he was ordered. And he thought that because he made it back in one piece, that it was all behind him and he could just get on with the rest of his life (same thing with my oldest brother – AO related cancer and amputation). But it wasn’t over. For many vets, it will never be over, and the government needs to grow a pair, man up, and take care of these vets. These vets were responsible to our government and now they deserve the same in return – not the obstructionism so many receive.

Macbeth

REPLY
@macbeth

@hopeful33250
I did see it. Yes, I hate to say it, but I feel a pang these days when I hear someone say “Thanks for your service.” Not that all vets do not deserve our respect. They certainly do. It’s because of the situation with all of the problems they suffer in relation to their service.

O.K. My feeling is that, when someone drops everything else in their life – everything — and answer the call, the government owes them. Period. My husband was drafted. He wasn’t hung ho to go, but he just thought he wasn’t any better than the next guy down the line at American Motorrs, or on the next farm down the road. He went. He did as he was ordered. And he thought that because he made it back in one piece, that it was all behind him and he could just get on with the rest of his life (same thing with my oldest brother – AO related cancer and amputation). But it wasn’t over. For many vets, it will never be over, and the government needs to grow a pair, man up, and take care of these vets. These vets were responsible to our government and now they deserve the same in return – not the obstructionism so many receive.

Macbeth

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@macbeth. Well said.

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