prostate cancer

Posted by Alex 20 @alex20, Jul 13, 2011

How do men handle prostate cancer

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I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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My father was diagnosed with prostate cancer in 1996. He/we looked into radiation seeding and other options but chose to come to Mayo Clinic for removal of his prostate. He is still cancer-free 15 years later. Thank you to the wonderful doctors and nurses who cared for him.

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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A week ago I was diagnosed with prostate cancer. I am 68 yo with a history of a heart attack in Feb. 2008 treated with placement of a stent rather than bypass surgery.
My urologist favors robotic surgery involving complete removal of the gland. The cancer has not spread at this point.
I am especially interested if you are about my age, any side effects you experienced, and what your experience was like at the Mayo Clinic.
Paul

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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Hello,

I am 66 years old and in otherwise very good health. First, my experience at the Mayo Clinic was absolutely the best! I recommend the robotic prostatectomy since I am a fan of technology and the thought of a speedier recovery appealed to me. There is some discomfort after the operation. It’s primarily stomach muscle related and improves daily. The six incisions begin healing right away. The biggest aggravation was the need to wear a catheter for 10 days, but I found ways to make it more tolerable. Once the catheter is removed life gets better immediately. Incontinence was never an issue – that is to say that I never experienced uncontrolled urination and there was never a need for Depends. The side effect typically called incontinence is what I call an ucontrolled “whoops”, meaning that a certain move or strain may produce a squirt of urine. You can buy “pads” at Walmart to deal with this. I used a brand called Options and at first I went with the “light” and then graduated to “very light”. This, too, improves over time and now I do not wear them at all and it’s been 9 weeks since my surgery. Erection? Not yet. I didn’t have any problems prior to surgery so I am optimistic that will resolve itself in time. If not, my wife and I are comfortable knowing that my cancerous prostate has been removed and so be it. There may be other options, but for now it’s wait and see.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you would like more details.

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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Hi,
I live in the NYC area which has many great hospitals. You make it clear that you were very pleased with your experience at the Mayo Clinic. But was geographic proximity the real reason for choosing this hospital?
Can you convince me to travel from NYC to Rochester, MN because the Mayo Clinic is really the cats pajamas?

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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Hi,

I live in the Savannah, GA area. The Mayo Clinic I went to is in Jacksonville, FL, so, yes, geography was a factor. More importantly for me, though, is the knowledge that the Mayo Clinic has been on the cutting edge of research and technology for as long as I can remember. I certainly felt that they were a better option than what we have locally. I can’t comment on NYC facilities, nor is it my place to convince you to do anything. My experience at the Mayo was a good one; probably close to the cat’s pajamas as you can get.

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I’m writing from the female partner point of view. My husband was diagnosed with prostate cancer 13 years ago and was treated at Mayo with surgery. He is cancer free to this day. However he suffered from impotence – erectile dysfunction. For a while this was devastating to him and of course affected me as well. With the help of Mayo we learned to refrain and regain our ability to be intimate. We have written a book about our experience but would be happy to share more if anyone is interested.

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My husband is 51 years old and has been diagonsed with aggressive prostrate cancer with a rare form involving the seminal tubes. We were scheduled for surgery Aug 8, but now the specialist from Duke has said that it is too advanced from the tests and wants to go directly to radiation therapy. Has anyone experience this or knows of anyone who has?

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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What is your age? Incontinence? Impotency? Which Dr. Gleason score?

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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What was your Gleason score?

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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See my July 21st post. My gleason score was 3+3 or 6. At 3-1/2 months incontinence is not a problem. Impotency is a problem, however, my surgeon/urologist said it could take up to a year or more. I’ve elected to stay away from the pills for now.

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@jimsanf

I can tell you how I handled it. After the biopsy and discovery that I did, indeed, have prostate cancer, I immediately planned to have my prostate removed. I didn’t even discuss radiation seeding, etc. The key to prostate cancer, in my opinion, is catching it early and removing the organ. It’s an organ one does not have to have to live one’s life. My surgery was on May 10, 2011 and my recovery was uneventful. I can provide more details if you are interested.

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Who was your Dr.? I am 68 years old and in good health. I am leaning towards Robotic Surgery. I consult with Dr. Frank on Sept. 26th! Thanks for the reply!!

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