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Pituitary Tumors

Posted by @toffenbacher, Dec 15, 2016

In this Video Q&A Dr. Curtiss Cook, Dr. Bernard Bendok, and Dr. Alyx Porter discuss pituitary gland tumors.

Learn more about:

  • Normal function of pituitary gland
  • Types of pituitary tumors
  • Symptoms of a pituitary tumor
  • Treatment of pituitary tumor

The speakers answer questions live during the event. 

Note: The sound issues are corrected after 2 minutes.

Reply

Posted by @dailychronicsupportgroup, Dec 19, 2016

Are there any programs for pituitary tumor patients, who are not insured? I also have a pineal cyst, and haven’t had a brain scan in over a year, because I can’t afford the procedure.


Colleen Young, Connect Director
@colleenyoung

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Joined: Jul 23, 2014
Posted by @colleenyoung, Dec 19, 2016

Hi @upartist @dmedina71 @torino1qm @neffjsn @lindalongberry @conniemk @shellsk24 @dailychronicsupportgroup @jasonkwellls.

Today, Dec 19 at 5:15 CT, we are hosting a video Q&A about Pituitary Tumors with Mayo Clinic experts Dr. Curtiss Cook, Dr. Bernard Bendok, and Dr. Alyx Porter. You can participate by asking questions; Click View & Reply to see the details.

You do not need a Facebook account to be able to watch the broadcast. You can watch it right here on this page on Connect.
Please post your questions before the event or during the broadcast.

Liked by shellsk24


jasonkwellls
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Posted by @jasonkwellls, Dec 19, 2016

I don’t see anything playing?


Colleen Young, Connect Director
@colleenyoung

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Joined: Jul 23, 2014
Posted by @colleenyoung, Dec 19, 2016

Click VIEW & REPLY in this email and see the video playing at the top of the webpage.


torino1qm
@torino1qm

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Posted by @torino1qm, Dec 19, 2016

The fact that a personsuch as myself diagnosed with a microadenoma six yrears ago and that there is a hx of fatigue, periodic blurriness and I cannot gain weight ( 84 years of age, male and five feet six weighing 100 pounds should there be anyconcern on my part Iron level is almost zero?

Posted by @toffenbacher, Dec 20, 2016

Hi,
Thank you so much for tuning in. We cannot provide medical advice here but would encourage you to speak with your doctor if you have concerns about your iron levels.


Kari Ulrich, Volunteer Mentor
@kariulrich

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Joined: Jul 15, 2011
Posted by @kariulrich, Dec 19, 2016

Can non-functional pituitary adenomas become functional years later? How often should labs be checked? How often should you have an MRI for monitoring a small pituitary adenoma? Thank you


Colleen Young, Connect Director
@colleenyoung

Posts: 3000
Joined: Jul 23, 2014
Posted by @colleenyoung, Dec 19, 2016

Welcome back to Connect, Kari! Quite a bit has changed since you were last here. I hope you’ll take a look around.


Kari Ulrich, Volunteer Mentor
@kariulrich

Posts: 208
Joined: Jul 15, 2011
Posted by @kariulrich, Dec 19, 2016

Will there be a transcript available, not sure if my questions were addressed. I could not hear part of the webinar.


Colleen Young, Connect Director
@colleenyoung

Posts: 3000
Joined: Jul 23, 2014
Posted by @colleenyoung, Dec 19, 2016

Hi Kari,
You can replay the video. It is posted at the top of this page. Unfortunately, they didn’t get to all the questions during the webinar. We will post answers to your questions here in the discussion thread 🙂

Posted by @toffenbacher, Dec 21, 2016

Hi Kari,
It is very unlikely that non-functional pituitary adenomas would become functional years later. Regarding the frequency of labs and MRI, this depends on the scenario and the recommendations may change over time. This should be decided in consultation with an endocrinologist. Thanks for watching!


Kari Ulrich, Volunteer Mentor
@kariulrich

Posts: 208
Joined: Jul 15, 2011
Posted by @kariulrich, Dec 21, 2016

Thank you so much for your reply! That question has been on my mind for years and I would always forget to ask my neurologist. I appreciate you taking the time to answer my questions. This webinar has been very helpful and has put my mind at ease.


upartist
@upartist

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Joined: Sep 15, 2016
Posted by @upartist, Dec 19, 2016

has the research determined if there is a familial link with pituitary adenomas? I understand there are various kinds. My family has three generations of macro adenomas.

Posted by @toffenbacher, Dec 20, 2016

Hi,
Thank you for tuning in.
According to MayoClinic.org:
A small percentage of pituitary tumor cases runs in families, but most have no apparent hereditary factor. Still, scientists suspect that genetic alterations play an important role in how pituitary tumors develop. People with a family history of certain hereditary conditions, such as multiple endocrine neoplasia, type I (MEN I), have an increased risk of pituitary tumors. In MEN I, multiple tumors occur in various glands of the endocrine system. Genetic testing is available for this disorder.

You can learn more here: http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/pituitary-tumors/symptoms-causes/dxc-20157631


Teresa, Volunteer Mentor
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Posted by @hopeful33250, Dec 21, 2016

Hello @toffenbacher, I am intrigued by this topic as this seems to be a type of endocrine tumor – am I right in this assumption? This leads me to my next thought. I’ve had multiple neuroendocrine tumors (carcinoids) in the duodenal bulb (2003, 2005 and 2016). I’ve often wondered if the primary site of this tumor is really the duodenal bulb or elsewhere. Has there ever been any studies related to NETs and pituitary tumors? My endocrinologist has suggested the possibility of MEN1 which makes all of this sound familiar. I have several, but not all, of the symptoms. I also have hyperparathyroidism, osteopenia, and several other odd /rate disorders. Any comments on these thoughts?

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