Newly diagnosed: IDC Tubular Carcinoma of the Breast

Posted by sueriener @sueriener, Mar 22 12:03pm

I was just diagnosed last week with infiltrating ductal carcinoma tubular common. Does anyone have knowledge of this type of breast cancer?

@sueriener

Hi, Sue, and welcome to MayoConnect. I have posted below two websites which will give you an idea of your diagnosis and which also may help you develop questions for your oncologist.
https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/breast-cancer/in-depth/breast-cancer/art-20045654
https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/types/tubular

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In reply to @sueriener "Thank you!" + (show)
@sueriener

Thank you!

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I second @elizm welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am sorry to hear that you were diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma tubular.

Can you tell me a little more about your diagnosis and what they have offered you?

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I was just diagnosed with the exact same as you on the March 15th. Had biopsy and was also in my underarm lymph node. I see a surgeon this Thursday. I am scared and nervous. I need an MRI to see if it's spread to other parts of my body. Most fear I've ever experienced. They suggested flap surgery for reconstruction. I'll let you know what the Surgeon suggest after I see him. Prayer's for you and I. BIG HUGS!

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Oh Linda I'm so sorry! I met with the surgeon yesterday and she is extremely capable and actually very hilarious. I talked about what I didn't want, and she was pretty funny about talking me into things. What I found out in the sixteen years my husband has had cancer, is that you will be treated with Loving Hands. I'm very preoccupied with the information I got yesterday. She said this particular cancer is not aggressive, but because of the way it hides in the milk ducts and the tubular form it's hard to know how far to go when they take it out, to get clear margins. They will go in and do a lumpectomy, but if the margins aren't clear, they have to go back in. Breast cancer is very curable nowadays, so put your mind at ease for now. Let me know how it goes and I'll do the same. God bless you

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@amandaburnett

I second @elizm welcome to Mayo Clinic Connect. I am sorry to hear that you were diagnosed with infiltrating ductal carcinoma tubular.

Can you tell me a little more about your diagnosis and what they have offered you?

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I met with the surgeon yesterday, and they are going to do an MRI and a lumpectomy for starters. She did say that this cancer it's hard to find because of the way it hides in the milk ducts, instead of being a hard lump. She was excellent in drawing me timelines and different scenarios. Best case is lumpectomy with clear margins, if not we're looking at more surgery, radiation, and medication for ER and PR positive but her2 negative cancer.

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@mick2

I was just diagnosed with the exact same as you on the March 15th. Had biopsy and was also in my underarm lymph node. I see a surgeon this Thursday. I am scared and nervous. I need an MRI to see if it's spread to other parts of my body. Most fear I've ever experienced. They suggested flap surgery for reconstruction. I'll let you know what the Surgeon suggest after I see him. Prayer's for you and I. BIG HUGS!

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@mick2 @sueriener
Dear Linda and Sue. You both are in our prayers. You have joined a large, but understanding sisterhood (one in every seven American women) who have acquired breast cancer. Thankfully, we live in an age where the oncology community knows how to handle this malady more successfully than ever before. Do your homework (knowledge is power) to learn as much as you can so that you are able to generate a helpful (to you) discussion with your oncology team, and to plan your life ahead. Statistics are in your favor that your life will be long and health-filled, and your MayoConnect community is here to walk beside you.

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@elizm

@mick2 @sueriener
Dear Linda and Sue. You both are in our prayers. You have joined a large, but understanding sisterhood (one in every seven American women) who have acquired breast cancer. Thankfully, we live in an age where the oncology community knows how to handle this malady more successfully than ever before. Do your homework (knowledge is power) to learn as much as you can so that you are able to generate a helpful (to you) discussion with your oncology team, and to plan your life ahead. Statistics are in your favor that your life will be long and health-filled, and your MayoConnect community is here to walk beside you.

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@elizm beautiful stated. We are all here with you, @mick2

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@sueriener

Oh Linda I'm so sorry! I met with the surgeon yesterday and she is extremely capable and actually very hilarious. I talked about what I didn't want, and she was pretty funny about talking me into things. What I found out in the sixteen years my husband has had cancer, is that you will be treated with Loving Hands. I'm very preoccupied with the information I got yesterday. She said this particular cancer is not aggressive, but because of the way it hides in the milk ducts and the tubular form it's hard to know how far to go when they take it out, to get clear margins. They will go in and do a lumpectomy, but if the margins aren't clear, they have to go back in. Breast cancer is very curable nowadays, so put your mind at ease for now. Let me know how it goes and I'll do the same. God bless you

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Thank You so very much. I will be having a total removal of breast. I just read where you can not get tubes wet. The more I read the more I fear. Mine is invasive and I have too much to learn in such a short time. Will I be able to care for my self at home? etc. Big Hugs and God Bless you also

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@sparklegram

@elizm beautiful stated. We are all here with you, @mick2

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Thank you!! I'm sure gonna need you! If I can type???? I'm on a tablet computer……

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@mick2

Thank You so very much. I will be having a total removal of breast. I just read where you can not get tubes wet. The more I read the more I fear. Mine is invasive and I have too much to learn in such a short time. Will I be able to care for my self at home? etc. Big Hugs and God Bless you also

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@mick2
Hi Linda – It is all a lot to take in at once, but please do not panic. I had 3 cancerous nodes and one eroded into the lymphatic system (invasive). It had partial mastectomy of that side (which was pretty much the whole breast as I was quite large breasted) and the other side was reduced while they were there. You will be able to take care of yourself at home. I stayed one night in the hospital and my hubby was with me there as the rooms in this hospital had a sleeping nook. I think about the first 2-3 days I was unable to "milk" the tub and drain the little bulb holder by myself as I was a bit sore, however, after that I was able to accomplish it on my own. Yes, you don't want to get the area wet, but you can use a washcloth to clean yourself. I have a hand-held shower head to wash me from the waste down and I washed my hair in the laundry room sink. You will want to keep track of the drainage from the tubes as the surgeon will decide then when the tubes come out, i.e. amount and clarity of fluid. Be sure to write down all your questions as you think of them so that you can ask the oncology surgeon and have a family member with you as well because what you forget, they will remember. Since yours is invasive, you may have extra radiation treatments – I had a total of 30. And if you were ER/PR positive and her2-neu negative, they will suggest you go on an aromatase inhibitor – those will be a whole lot of extra questions! In the meantime, and again, DO NOT PANIC. Take one day at a time. Following surgery what helped me was to count of 1 day at a time of my "tube time," i.e. 21, 20, 19, etc. You can do this…we all believe on you!

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In December of 2019, I was diagnosed with IDC i.e.invasive Ductal Carcinoma. 80% of breast cancers are this kind. I have not heard about anything called tubular unless you are saying that you will have a drainage tube; that comes with the surgery anyway (and there are other surgeries that have this, not just breast surgery). In thinking of all this, it is very overwhelming at first. Take one step at a time…Read about it so nothing comes as a shock. For me, I decided to see the big picture first…What is the safest way to go…i.e. Do you want to live? I felt that the best way to insure that the cancer could not spread (even though it was below Stage 1) was to have a complete mastectomy on my right breast plus the testing of the lymph nodes and I did. Yes, be careful to see that you have enough drainage going on…I was not a good candidate for reconstruction, per surgeon, due to other medical conditions and so I put that to rest. My mother also had a "radical" mastectomy as it was called in those days -(70's) done 53 years ago and she lived to be 90. I pray for you, find peace with it…

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