Let's Chat: Ken Burns film, "The Mayo Clinic, Faith - Hope - Science"

Posted by steeldove @steeldove, Sep 11, 2018

This new Ken Burns film will be on PBS on September 25, 9/8 Central

@bumblebee1

I read your story and as I sit here my hands shake and the pain in my neck, arms and hands is ever present. I love to paint as well, not a fine artist, but I am losing what ability I have as I now need two hands to hold a brush after just a short time of painting. I have had surgeries, ACDF c5-6 cC-7, cubital and carpel entrapment on both arms, and yet the pain and weakness still exist. It’s funny really, I came on the site regarding my Husbands neuropathy from a mortar blast, not really thinking about myself…

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Thank you, Bumblebee! My hand shook too, and the last painting I did before I had surgery was with 2 hands holding the brush because I was having trouble controlling it. I had spinal cord compression at C5 C6 due to a ruptured disc and bone spurs along with thoracic outlet syndrome. For that I do physical therapy with myofascial release. I still get arm pain from TOS, and when we stretch out the compressed muscle and tight fascia, I get a little better. My therapy for TOS was interrupted by spine surgery, and I'm back at it again. MFR possibly could help you and it can help break up fascial scar tissue from the surgeries. During my recovery from spine surgery last summer, I would have to lay on the floor on my back and rest after painting and I gradually rebuilt my strength. See myofascialrelease.com for info about that kind of treatment. I'm not sure how long it has been since your spine surgeries, but if you are getting worse, it might be worth getting a new MRI in you think there could be further spine issues. You might also want to get an evaluation for thoracic outlet syndrome because it is often missed and has overlapping symptoms with carpal tunnel and cubital tunnel and spine issues. It is the brachial plexus that gets compressed as it passes in-between the collar bone and rib cage. Mayo can evaluate that as there are not a lot of places that treat it. You can have nerve entrapment anywhere along a nerve pathway or in multiple places that produce the same pain. Here is some info on TOS https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/thoracic-outlet-syndrome/symptoms-causes/syc-20353988

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@c2insa

Heads of departments were involved in this behavior, which gives me have NO HOPE and NO FAITH that I would treated fairly. Only a public expose in person plus national and local media is going to have a chance!

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I'm so sorry you are going through this..sending you hugs..x

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@harriethodgson1

We watched the Ken Burns film and loved it. My father-in-law, a specialist in diseases of the chest, was on the staff for years, met Will and Charlie, and died at 98 1/2 years old. My brother-in-law was a specialist in endocrinology and founded the American College of Clinical Endocrinology. My husband was a specialist in aerospace/aviation medicine, internal medicine, and preventive medicine. My second brother-in-law received his PhD from Mayo. Although we knew the clinic's history, we learned new things from the film and would love to see it again.

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Thanks for the likes everyone.

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I saw this special on PBS by Ken Burns and it was excellent!!! A lifetime acquaintance of mine has a daughter who is a Cardiac charge nurse at the Rochester, Mn. Mayo facility and the similarities are absolutely true.

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My television has trouble getting many special shows – and I tend to look for ones that do not talk about any illness. But – the Mayo Clinic was famous long before those stars were born – my grandfather went there (up in the great cold North near where. he lived – and got the newest treatment available – for something that before that was known to "just end on a not good note."

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@colleenyoung

I'm so glad that you guys started this discussion here. I would like to invite all Mayo Clinic Connect members to watch the documentary and share their impressions and reactions. It will be like we're all watching it together.

According to PBS, the documentary will take a timely look at how one institution has met the changing demands of healthcare. The two-hour documentary is executive-produced by Ken Burns and directed by Burns, Erik Ewers and Christopher Loren Ewers. Featuring interviews with patients including John McCain and the Dalai Lama, the film tells the story of William Worrall Mayo, an English immigrant who began practicing medicine with his sons Will and Charlie in the late 1800s in Rochester, Minnesota.

Don’t worry if you have to miss the broadcast on Sept 25, the film will be available to the public on the PBS website for two weeks following the premiere https://www.pbs.org/show/the-mayo-clinic/

Visit https://explore.mayoclinic.org/ for the latest news and resources about the film.

Are you planning to watch "The Mayo Clinic, Faith – Hope – Science"? I am.

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Ken failed to mention anything negative regarding the doctors story, as in the Indian uprising, to bad as it wasn't totally truthful.

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@ephentges I think Ken Burns had to decide the focus of his documentary and show how each part of it advanced the story of how Mayo came to be what it is today as a leader in medical knowledge and healing over a time span when medicine was in its infancy and very little was known as compared to today when doctors can do some amazing things. Since it was about hope and healing and how that relates to patients today, his focus was to show the history of the Mayo doctors and how the discoveries of medical knowledge generated hope and healing for patients. Ken Burns has himself been a Mayo patient (as said in the panel discussions about the film), and I think he was coming from his own experience and perspective in telling the story of Mayo. If he was telling a story about conflicts in our history, it would be a different story and the focus would change. Thank you for your comment. I wanted to acknowledge you. I understand some of the difficulties, and I have listened to my Native friends speak about the past. We have the advantage of looking backward at history from where we are now. If we had lived during those times, our opinions likely would have been shaped by the times in which we had lived. We are also very lucky to live in times where medicine can do a lot more for us as patients.

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@jenniferhunter

@ephentges I think Ken Burns had to decide the focus of his documentary and show how each part of it advanced the story of how Mayo came to be what it is today as a leader in medical knowledge and healing over a time span when medicine was in its infancy and very little was known as compared to today when doctors can do some amazing things. Since it was about hope and healing and how that relates to patients today, his focus was to show the history of the Mayo doctors and how the discoveries of medical knowledge generated hope and healing for patients. Ken Burns has himself been a Mayo patient (as said in the panel discussions about the film), and I think he was coming from his own experience and perspective in telling the story of Mayo. If he was telling a story about conflicts in our history, it would be a different story and the focus would change. Thank you for your comment. I wanted to acknowledge you. I understand some of the difficulties, and I have listened to my Native friends speak about the past. We have the advantage of looking backward at history from where we are now. If we had lived during those times, our opinions likely would have been shaped by the times in which we had lived. We are also very lucky to live in times where medicine can do a lot more for us as patients.

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@jenniferhunter– Very well said!

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@jenniferhunter

@ephentges I think Ken Burns had to decide the focus of his documentary and show how each part of it advanced the story of how Mayo came to be what it is today as a leader in medical knowledge and healing over a time span when medicine was in its infancy and very little was known as compared to today when doctors can do some amazing things. Since it was about hope and healing and how that relates to patients today, his focus was to show the history of the Mayo doctors and how the discoveries of medical knowledge generated hope and healing for patients. Ken Burns has himself been a Mayo patient (as said in the panel discussions about the film), and I think he was coming from his own experience and perspective in telling the story of Mayo. If he was telling a story about conflicts in our history, it would be a different story and the focus would change. Thank you for your comment. I wanted to acknowledge you. I understand some of the difficulties, and I have listened to my Native friends speak about the past. We have the advantage of looking backward at history from where we are now. If we had lived during those times, our opinions likely would have been shaped by the times in which we had lived. We are also very lucky to live in times where medicine can do a lot more for us as patients.

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@jenniferhunter Some very positive points. Indeed we are fortunate.

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@ephentges

Ken failed to mention anything negative regarding the doctors story, as in the Indian uprising, to bad as it wasn't totally truthful.

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I watched part of it, and it was exciting if you're a Mayo employee or patient. But was Burns paid by Mayo to do the documentary? While we're on that, did anyone watch the program (I missed it. Not that i would have watched it anyway) about some relatives helping a young woman supposedly "escape" from Mayo? Had the woman been in the hospital for 2 months? I would be interested in knowing if her insurance was going to pay for her stay. What do you think it costs to stay in the hospital for 2 months?

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@usernameca

I watched part of it, and it was exciting if you're a Mayo employee or patient. But was Burns paid by Mayo to do the documentary? While we're on that, did anyone watch the program (I missed it. Not that i would have watched it anyway) about some relatives helping a young woman supposedly "escape" from Mayo? Had the woman been in the hospital for 2 months? I would be interested in knowing if her insurance was going to pay for her stay. What do you think it costs to stay in the hospital for 2 months?

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@usernameca, I can see where one might be sceptical and think Ken Burns might have been coerced into making a subjective documentary about Mayo Clinic. But the opposite is true. Mayo Clinic had no editorial control over the production.

In his words, Burns told Fortune.com in this interview http://fortune.com/2018/09/25/ken-burns-mayo-clinic/
“I didn’t set out to give a wet kiss to the Mayo Clinic,” says Burns. “I’ve been making films about quintessential American stories and people for more than 40 years… What I came to find is the Mayo Clinic’s story is a wonderful, complicated mixture of American ingredients.

This article from Everyday Health explains the relationship between Mayo Clinic and the film makers during the 3 year process and how they built trust. The film makers were given access to Mayo, to patient stories, etc. https://www.everydayhealth.com/healthy-living/mayo-clinic-stars-new-ken-burns-documentary/

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@usernameca

I watched part of it, and it was exciting if you're a Mayo employee or patient. But was Burns paid by Mayo to do the documentary? While we're on that, did anyone watch the program (I missed it. Not that i would have watched it anyway) about some relatives helping a young woman supposedly "escape" from Mayo? Had the woman been in the hospital for 2 months? I would be interested in knowing if her insurance was going to pay for her stay. What do you think it costs to stay in the hospital for 2 months?

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@usernameca you wouldn't have received the full story just from the program on TV or on most of the news networks. This is a more accurate account of what happened:

MPR Outlines Deficiencies in CNN ‘Escape from Mayo Clinic’ Series
https://socialmedia.mayoclinic.org/2018/08/15/mpr-outlines-deficiencies-in-cnn-escape-from-mayo-clinic-series/

Yes, hospital stays cost a lot of money but if I have to be in a hospital I would like it to be associated with Mayo Clinic where I know I'm going to get good care.

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@usernameca When I saw the CNN story, I paused the video and read the documents on the screen, so I knew there was a family situation that they were not reporting about, and that the real story must be very different from the reported version. I even sent an e mail stating that to the reporters who authored this saying this was a very different story from what they reported and how important integrity is in journalism. There was no response.

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@jenniferhunter

@usernameca When I saw the CNN story, I paused the video and read the documents on the screen, so I knew there was a family situation that they were not reporting about, and that the real story must be very different from the reported version. I even sent an e mail stating that to the reporters who authored this saying this was a very different story from what they reported and how important integrity is in journalism. There was no response.

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@jenniferhunter Journalism is often a set of events twisted around to make the story an attention grabber, and sadly the complete facts are hidden.
Ginger

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@colleenyoung

@usernameca, I can see where one might be sceptical and think Ken Burns might have been coerced into making a subjective documentary about Mayo Clinic. But the opposite is true. Mayo Clinic had no editorial control over the production.

In his words, Burns told Fortune.com in this interview http://fortune.com/2018/09/25/ken-burns-mayo-clinic/
“I didn’t set out to give a wet kiss to the Mayo Clinic,” says Burns. “I’ve been making films about quintessential American stories and people for more than 40 years… What I came to find is the Mayo Clinic’s story is a wonderful, complicated mixture of American ingredients.

This article from Everyday Health explains the relationship between Mayo Clinic and the film makers during the 3 year process and how they built trust. The film makers were given access to Mayo, to patient stories, etc. https://www.everydayhealth.com/healthy-living/mayo-clinic-stars-new-ken-burns-documentary/

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Thank you for posting this Colleen. I think Burns achieved his goal of telling a unique, hopeful American story.

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