Netflix series!

Posted by wisfloj @wisfloj, Wed, Aug 21 7:28pm

I’m sure many of us are frustrated with medical opinions, diagnoses, recommendations etc. Very interesting new series called “Diagnosis“ on Netflix. Might appeal to those of you who wonder about the causes, treatment, next step etc. I am only halfway through the first episode and it is very engaging!

@wisfloj Thank you. Watching it now.

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Agreed – it's an awesome show! The first episode made me cry.

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HI, @wisfloj – thanks for the heads up about the Netflix series titled "Diagnosis."

I thought that many other members on Connect might be interested in this, such as @naturegirl5 @jenniferhunter @sandytoes14 @harriethodgson1 @frane1939 @johnbishop @kristap31.

wisfloj – did you find any part of the series thus far particularly enlightening or encouraging?

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Sigh, I've given up my Netflix for something with less garbage on it – Curiousity Stream which has more science, technology, history, and nature programs on it. I do have one month left on my subscription so maybe I can binge watch the series ☺

Liked by sherryw

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Neat! Thank you @lisalucier and @wisfloj for the heads up!

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@wisfloj watched the first episode, and loved it. Thanks so much for the info about the show. Hope you are ok???? My blessing…Lori

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@wisfloj, well I binged watched the Diagnosis series and finished the last episode this afternoon. I must say it was really good. What really struck me was how the doctor working with the New York Times described crowdsourcing and putting these patient stories out "there" to see what others could come up with for a diagnosis. Also she wanted to see if there were other patients with the same symptoms.

Light bulb illuminating here – sounds a lot like Mayo Clinic Connect. Patients searching for answers and meeting other patients with similar symptoms. All with a common goal of trying to help themselves while helping others. Thanks again @wisfloj for starting this discussion to let everyone know about the series on Netflix. It was one of the few things I've seen on Netflix that I liked and I'm glad all of the previous positive comments convinced me to watch it before I bail from Netflix.

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@johnbishop, I have one more to complete the series. My takeaway. The diagnosis is critical as you have taught me. It validates symptoms and sends a message about what medications and other lifestyle changes would be of benefit. The crowdsourcing is an entirely new concept to me. Lightbulbs going on……..Chris

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@artscaping

@johnbishop, I have one more to complete the series. My takeaway. The diagnosis is critical as you have taught me. It validates symptoms and sends a message about what medications and other lifestyle changes would be of benefit. The crowdsourcing is an entirely new concept to me. Lightbulbs going on……..Chris

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Chris I was hooked after the first episode. The doctor doing the series is a doppleganger for my dentist in Rochester who I've talked with about Connect.

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@johnbishop, So how would the doppelgänger handle “idiopathic”? It seems like we are fighting the same situation. The symptoms of Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN) can be confirmed with the skin punch test. Yet, what does that mean in the grand picture if there is no determination of how you get SFN which could then lead to how to prevent it? Chris

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I have seen them all now, the first one is by far my favorite! And I guess sometime we choose to just live with the diagnosis?? NOT me, I want a cure!

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@artscaping

@johnbishop, So how would the doppelgänger handle “idiopathic”? It seems like we are fighting the same situation. The symptoms of Small Fiber Neuropathy (SFN) can be confirmed with the skin punch test. Yet, what does that mean in the grand picture if there is no determination of how you get SFN which could then lead to how to prevent it? Chris

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@artscaping, I'm less concerned than a lot of members with trying to figure out how I got SFPN. More than likely it's hereditary since I have a first cousin who has it and also my late sister had it although she had diabetes too which may have been her cause. One of my earlier primary care docs told me I was pre-diabetic which I'm not buying since my A1C has never been that much out of line. I actually think mine was from years of taking a statin for high blood pressure. I was in a Mayo Clinic heart study in my 50s where they identified the cause of my high blood pressure as hypertension and then changed the meds I was taking to spironolactone and hydracholorthyazide. By that time I was already have numb toes. I'm more worried about progression and I feel like the supplements I take have slowed or stopped the progression in the past 3 years.

Actually my big hope for others with SFN is some kind of stem cell therapy when it gets advanced enough to have clinical trials and there are positive outcomes. Part of me thinks that diet plays a large part in the disease with all of the GMO products and chemicals used in producing the foods we eat. Don't be surprised if I make an appointment early next year with your MFR therapist to see if she is able to help me with my lower back and problems walking very far or much.

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John, I too am not overly concerned about the cause, I’ve read that a virus can cause it and that’s what I would attribute mine to, I had a glucose tolerance test which my internist suggested but that was a negative and as far as I know, no hereditary connections. I don’t think that with neuropathy you can unring the bell but perhaps future stem cell treatments will be the answer once the science is perfected.

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I found it! I am going to watch it!!!

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@jl1

I found it! I am going to watch it!!!

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You found what?

Liked by lorirenee1

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