Has anyone had monoclonal antibody treatment for COVID infection?

Posted by ktgirl @ktgirl, Nov 23, 2021

Has anyone here had this treatment and did you have any side effects from it. There seem to be a lot of side effects.

Interested in more discussions like this? Go to the Post-COVID Recovery & COVID-19 group.

@ktgirl and @jrg200911
Several monoclonal antibody medications are available to treat COVID infection. These include sotrovimab, a combination of bamlanivimab and etesevimab, and a combination of two antibodies called casirivimab and imdevimab. These drugs are used to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 in people who have a higher risk of developing serious illness due to COVID-19. Treatment consists of a single intravenous infusion given in an outpatient setting. To be most effective, these medications need to be given soon after COVID-19 symptoms start and prior to hospitalization.
Read more: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/expert-answers/coronavirus-drugs/faq-20485627

Timing is critical with monoclonal antibodies. The earlier they are given, the more effective they are at treating COVID-19. They are really most effective within the first 4 to 5 days of symptoms.
Read more: https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210826/monoclonal-antibodies-vs-vaccines-vs-covid-19

I'm tagging @becabranch @connie1977 and @luraew4 on this discussion. I believe, they or a family member has received monoclonal antibody treatment after getting COVID and hopefully they can share first-hand experiences about what it was like to get the treatment and what side effects they experienced.

KTgirl and JRG, is monoclonal antibody therapy an option for you?

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@colleenyoung

@ktgirl and @jrg200911
Several monoclonal antibody medications are available to treat COVID infection. These include sotrovimab, a combination of bamlanivimab and etesevimab, and a combination of two antibodies called casirivimab and imdevimab. These drugs are used to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 in people who have a higher risk of developing serious illness due to COVID-19. Treatment consists of a single intravenous infusion given in an outpatient setting. To be most effective, these medications need to be given soon after COVID-19 symptoms start and prior to hospitalization.
Read more: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/expert-answers/coronavirus-drugs/faq-20485627

Timing is critical with monoclonal antibodies. The earlier they are given, the more effective they are at treating COVID-19. They are really most effective within the first 4 to 5 days of symptoms.
Read more: https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210826/monoclonal-antibodies-vs-vaccines-vs-covid-19

I'm tagging @becabranch @connie1977 and @luraew4 on this discussion. I believe, they or a family member has received monoclonal antibody treatment after getting COVID and hopefully they can share first-hand experiences about what it was like to get the treatment and what side effects they experienced.

KTgirl and JRG, is monoclonal antibody therapy an option for you?

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From your description I do not believe it is a treatment option for me. I am nearing 15 months of Long Haul COVID. So, over a year past optimal treatment by monoclonal antibodies.

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@jrg200911

From your description I do not believe it is a treatment option for me. I am nearing 15 months of Long Haul COVID. So, over a year past optimal treatment by monoclonal antibodies.

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@jrg200911, Dr. Ganesh wrote about medications that may help with long haul COVID symptoms, as well as listing those that have no evidence of being effective. You can see the list here:

– Post-COVID Syndrome and Medications https://connect.mayoclinic.org/blog/post-covid-recovery/newsfeed-post/post-covid-syndrome-and-medications/

Fifteen months is a long time. Have you been or considered attending a post-COVID rehab program that uses multi-faceted approach to recovery?

REPLY
@colleenyoung

@ktgirl and @jrg200911
Several monoclonal antibody medications are available to treat COVID infection. These include sotrovimab, a combination of bamlanivimab and etesevimab, and a combination of two antibodies called casirivimab and imdevimab. These drugs are used to treat mild to moderate COVID-19 in people who have a higher risk of developing serious illness due to COVID-19. Treatment consists of a single intravenous infusion given in an outpatient setting. To be most effective, these medications need to be given soon after COVID-19 symptoms start and prior to hospitalization.
Read more: https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/coronavirus/expert-answers/coronavirus-drugs/faq-20485627

Timing is critical with monoclonal antibodies. The earlier they are given, the more effective they are at treating COVID-19. They are really most effective within the first 4 to 5 days of symptoms.
Read more: https://www.webmd.com/vaccines/covid-19-vaccine/news/20210826/monoclonal-antibodies-vs-vaccines-vs-covid-19

I'm tagging @becabranch @connie1977 and @luraew4 on this discussion. I believe, they or a family member has received monoclonal antibody treatment after getting COVID and hopefully they can share first-hand experiences about what it was like to get the treatment and what side effects they experienced.

KTgirl and JRG, is monoclonal antibody therapy an option for you?

Jump to this post

Hi, I am one of the individuals you asked for comments on our experience with monoclonal antibody treatments. My husband and I received the bamlanivimab infusion this past January. For us, we feel, it was a life saver. Our symptoms were fatigue, fever, severe aches, respiratory problems, nausea, and others. We went into the treatment center; the infusion took one 1 and then 1 hour of observation. We both felt 90% better when we walked out. The only systems that remained (for a few more days) were fatigue and very few aches. I had been experiencing serious breathing problems; I was on the verge of contacting my doctor about going to the hospital when I received the infusion. I strongly encourage anyone (within the 10 days window of symptoms) to contact your doctor's office so receive the information of when and where to go. We are very happy we had the opportunity to receive it. It is a shame that knowledge of the infusions are so limited and so many people did not have the opportunity to receive this treatment.

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My husband and I both had a monoclonal antibody infusion (Regeneron) within the post-Covid timeframe. We are both in out 70s and neither of us had to be hospitalized, so I guess it does keep you out of the hospital. Unfortunately we've both had other long-term after-effects, primarily some shortness of breath (and in my husband's case, fatigue, as well, that had lasted several months).

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No side affects. I think that is what reduced my Covid sickness to about three days. Just very tired. I would take it again.

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@jrg200911

Interested in knowing, too.

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I have a patient who received the monoclonal antibody treatment last week and developed a significant allergic reaction to it. The rash resolved with treatment. I don't know what criteria would be used to determine if someone is at risk for an allergic reaction, since it's not likely that any of my patients have received this treatment in the past.

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My wife and I both had the monoclonal antibody infusion and it was as close to a miracle drug as we have ever seen. I was feeling 50% better before I left the office and my wife had to go back one more time, but it stopped the covid symptoms right away. I was 95% better the next day. We have had absolutely no adverse side effects. We have a friend and his wife who both came down with covid and they took the same type of treatment with the same miraculous results. If I ever had covid again I would go this route in a heartbeat. Also now should have natural immunity.

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@connie1977

Hi, I am one of the individuals you asked for comments on our experience with monoclonal antibody treatments. My husband and I received the bamlanivimab infusion this past January. For us, we feel, it was a life saver. Our symptoms were fatigue, fever, severe aches, respiratory problems, nausea, and others. We went into the treatment center; the infusion took one 1 and then 1 hour of observation. We both felt 90% better when we walked out. The only systems that remained (for a few more days) were fatigue and very few aches. I had been experiencing serious breathing problems; I was on the verge of contacting my doctor about going to the hospital when I received the infusion. I strongly encourage anyone (within the 10 days window of symptoms) to contact your doctor's office so receive the information of when and where to go. We are very happy we had the opportunity to receive it. It is a shame that knowledge of the infusions are so limited and so many people did not have the opportunity to receive this treatment.

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I called to get the antibodies treatment at day 3 and didn't hear back from them. I'm at day 6 now and wonder if it's too late. I've heard they lose their potency the more days you wait. Being thanksgiving today I can't get a hold of anyone.

REPLY
@colleenyoung

@jrg200911, Dr. Ganesh wrote about medications that may help with long haul COVID symptoms, as well as listing those that have no evidence of being effective. You can see the list here:

– Post-COVID Syndrome and Medications https://connect.mayoclinic.org/blog/post-covid-recovery/newsfeed-post/post-covid-syndrome-and-medications/

Fifteen months is a long time. Have you been or considered attending a post-COVID rehab program that uses multi-faceted approach to recovery?

Jump to this post

The timing of my COVID diagnostics (PCR and Antibody) all rendered NEGATIVE results to my presumed asymptomatic acute infection. It wasn’t until nearly 12 months post symptom onset I received a POSITIVE result to the T-Detect t-cell test. Until that time I was mostly dismissed by my doctors, especially since all tests run (inc. multiple labs, ECHO, Cardiac Stress Test, Pulmonary Function Test) have returned normal range results. Even the local Post COVID Clinic staff, seen before the T-Detect POSITIVE, would not render a long haul diagnosis. Very frustrating and confusing for me since, by all accounts I have read, I am a textbook case for Long Haul COVID…

Literally overnight, from 9/10/2020 to 9/11/2020, I went from trim, healthy and active with no comorbidities, taking no prescription medications, walking 3-7 miles per day, to suffering shortness of breath; dizziness; chest pain/pressure; brainfog; fatigue; heart racing/palpitations/rate spikes and dips (up to 200bpm/down to mid-40bpm) with little to no exertion – many times while sitting, with nausea, full body flushes preceding these “episodes”; headaches; ribcage soreness, visual changes… overnight. My entire bag-o-symptoms are not always present together nor to the worst degree, but have been always everyday in some combination to varying degrees of severity since onset 9/11/2020. With any level of activity I risk a “crash” involving increase of severity of any or all symptoms lasting sometimes for days.

In the sea of information and mis-information crashing in waves from the medias, I have tried to do my own research to find ways to improve. Not wanting to self-diagnose nor self-medicate, I have sought out legitimate sources and pathways to wellness. For lack of a better recommendation, both my GP and neurologist have referred me to the Mayo Clinic. I am in the process of applying for help through your COVID Activity Rehabilitation Program (CARP) being administered only through the Rochester, MN clinic location. I have yet to hear back to coordinate a plan going forward.

I have also found Dr. Noah Greenspan of New York’s Pulmonary Wellness Foundation who has been centering efforts on COVID LongHaul research and treatment. They have made available free online access to their 6-week “Pulmonary Boot Camp” video reactivity program which incorporates breathing exercises with a gradual increase in activity over the 6 week cycle. I’m just getting started with the program so have no reports yet for effectiveness. I am hopeful.

Pulmonary Wellness Foundation
Dr. Noah Greenspan, PT, DPT, CCS, EMT-B
10 East 38th St, 10th Floor
New York, NY 10016
212-921-0214
breathe@pulmonarywellness.org
http://www.pulmonarywellness.org

There are still so many unknowns as we all navigate through COVID. I’m willing to serve as a guinea pig of sorts if it ultimately leads to the health and well-being of others. In the meantime, I have run to my Lord, in whom is my trust, for refuge in troubled and joyous times. All is well with my soul.

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